#1
First of all, I'm not a complete beginner at theory, but I no expert either; I can figure out the notes on the fretboard in a couple of seconds, I know the major/minor scales (nat., harmonic and melodic) and some modes, know how to harmonize them and even name a few triads (when it's written on sheet music).

I'm terrible at improv and I'd like to change that. I only learned the I-IV-V progression in my MT class, but it shouldn't be much of a problem (I think).

I'd also like to use more than one scale on a solo, and not be stuck with your average scale shape (which can be solved by moving around the neck, right?).

I didn't mention that I don't do alot of planning before improvising. If I take the time to analyze the progression and write down what sounds good over the progression, will I be on the right track?

And one more (n00b) question, how do I solo over riffs? Do I harmonize over the notes and see what chords I come up with? Or do I try to figure out the scales used in the riff?

Thank you MT Forum, and sorry if I didn't make something clear (or tl;dr).
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#2
Quote by aznrockerdude
First of all, I'm not a complete beginner at theory, but I no expert either; I can figure out the notes on the fretboard in a couple of seconds, I know the major/minor scales (nat., harmonic and melodic) and some modes, know how to harmonize them and even name a few triads (when it's written on sheet music).

I'm terrible at improv and I'd like to change that. I only learned the I-IV-V progression in my MT class, but it shouldn't be much of a problem (I think).

I'd also like to use more than one scale on a solo, and not be stuck with your average scale shape (which can be solved by moving around the neck, right?).

I didn't mention that I don't do alot of planning before improvising. If I take the time to analyze the progression and write down what sounds good over the progression, will I be on the right track?
And one more (n00b) question, how do I solo over riffs? Do I harmonize over the notes and see what chords I come up with? Or do I try to figure out the scales used in the riff?

Thank you MT Forum, and sorry if I didn't make something clear (or tl;dr).


If you plan an improv, it's no longer improv. Simply listen to the chords, and use the notes in the scale the progression is in.
#3
Quote by captainoid
If you plan an improv, it's no longer improv. Simply listen to the chords, and use the notes in the scale the progression is in.

Sorry for my n00b post, but how am I going to figure out what to play if random chords are being thrown at me?
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#4
No problem at all, everyone starts somewhere. In the case of a jam situation where you are unfamiliar with the chord, just use the root note (usually the first note in a chord), to find a scale shape you are comfortable with (the major or pentatonic) and harmonize it with the progression. To harmonize over the solo, simply move your scale shape until the root notes match up. (disclaimer: This is how I do it. If you find it challenging/not the way you roll, try making up some simple I-V-IV progressions (E to A to B) and solo over them and using different scales.)
Last edited by captainoid at Aug 16, 2008,
#5
Quote by captainoid
No problem at all, everyone starts somewhere. In the case of a jam situation where you are unfamiliar with the chord, just use the root note (usually the first note in a chord), to find a scale shape you are comfortable with (the major or pentatonic) and harmonize it with the progression. To harmonize over the solo, simply move your scale shape until the root notes match up.

Yeah I know what's a root . But that's where I'm kinda getting at, I don't want to use C maj. over C-F-G7-C, loads of people already do that and my phrasing doesn't quite make me stand out of the crowd.
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#7
Ah, I see. Well, I'm sorry, but I have reached the end of my theory-rope. Good luck on getting your question answered. *walks dejectedly into sunset*
#8
Quote by aznrockerdude
Yeah I know what's a root . But that's where I'm kinda getting at, I don't want to use C maj. over C-F-G7-C, loads of people already do that and my phrasing doesn't quite make me stand out of the crowd.


Basically, no matter what you do you will play C Major.. that progression is not modal..

however you can bust out other scales for flavor..

Just the basic ones to practice:

Over C - C Major pentatonic, C Major

Over F - F Major pentatonic, C Major pentatonic, C Major

Over G7 (this is where all the cool scales come out) - G minor pentatonic, G Major pentatonic, G mixolydian (some people will argue about this but the mixolydian sound can be achieved over this chord), G# Diminished (arpeggio)

There are way more things you can do, but this stuff should keep you occupied.. but still make sense.
#9
Quote by ouchies
Basically, no matter what you do you will play C Major.. that progression is not modal..

however you can bust out other scales for flavor..

Just the basic ones to practice:

Over C - C Major pentatonic, C Major

Over F - F Major pentatonic, C Major pentatonic, C Major

Over G7 (this is where all the cool scales come out) - G minor pentatonic, G Major pentatonic, G mixolydian (some people will argue about this but the mixolydian sound can be achieved over this chord), G# Diminished (arpeggio)

There are way more things you can do, but this stuff should keep you occupied.. but still make sense.

That's it? Was I making this harder than it actually is or is that just improv for dummies?
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#11
For now, stick to the box shapes and solo over songs you know.

Also start transcribing solos, or at least learning them.
#12
If you want to take the next step in your improvisational journey, work each chord differently. Learn the notes in the chord and arpeggiate them, learn which of the note in the chord make which sounds.
#13
Quote by captainoid
If you plan an improv, it's no longer improv. Simply listen to the chords, and use the notes in the scale the progression is in.

That's rubbish...there's always some planning going on, it's just that as you get more experience you have more ideas to draw on and the time taken to plan things gets a lot less.

Improvising is technically just composing very quickly - it's a skill that has to be learned, same as any other , and you need to start at the beginning. If you can't yet compose a solo in half an hour then how exactly are you supposed to pull one out of thin air instantly?
Actually called Mark!

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#14
Of course you can use the mixolydian over a G7 chord, who would argue about that?

One thing that I would reccomend with improv is when soloing, build your solo. Start simple phrases, and take pauses. Take long pauses, even a bar or two. Then start to build up the solo each chorus, start playing longer phrases, then come the 16th notes. I like soloing like that personally.

And use some chromatics every now and then, not always obviously, and just use them as an approach to other notes.

And listen to other people, and listen to alot of other instruments and styles of soloists. And see live shows as often as possible.
#16
Quote by ouchies
^ Theory Nazis.

A lot of people tell other people on this forum that unless its a modal vamp or progression modes cannot be used

They can't - once you get into complex progressions then you end up with an overall tonal centre removing modes from the equation. Even if you chose to include the notes of G mixolydian over your G7 chord within a progression you're not actually playing in G mixolydian, you're still playing in the parent key, you just happen to be using accidentals that match the notes of G mixolydian.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com