#5
Quote by Hobopotamus
Csus

i gots a question too.
if you just put Csus, does it automatically mean its a Csus4?
or does it mean it just has a sustained note..?
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#6
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
i gots a question too.
if you just put Csus, does it automatically mean its a Csus4?
or does it mean it just has a sustained note..?



i would say it would imply a sus2 because alot of people would say a sus4 is just a sus2 a fifth below the root of the sus4 and vice versa.

so Csus4 has C F G but and Fsus2 has F G C and it is believed by some that only sus2 exist in thoery. ans sus 4 are just a biproduct to say.

so i think it would imply a sus2 but in this case there should be an F but there is an arguement about this
#7
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
i gots a question too.
if you just put Csus, does it automatically mean its a Csus4?
or does it mean it just has a sustained note..?


Sus doesn't mean "sustained" when referring to a chord. The answer to your question is: It depends. Different people will use it to refer to either sus4 or 7sus4.

and it is believed by some that only sus2 exist in thoery


It really isn't a matter of belief. Theory is a descriptive system, and sus4 chords are chords in their own right in many genres. Certain genres have evolved in their own little worlds, and have refined methods of theoretical analysis that really only work correctly within that little world. Ask a classical composer to analyze a jazz piece, and you'll see what I mean. The genres have evolved separately, and have entirely differently goals when describing their music. Half of the chords used in jazz don't exist from the standpoint of a classical musician.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 16, 2008,
#8
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
i gots a question too.
if you just put Csus, does it automatically mean its a Csus4?
or does it mean it just has a sustained note..?

It usually implies either a Csus4 or C7sus4 depending on the preference of the person doing the transcription.

EDIT: You had to beat me to it, Archeo?
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
Sus doesn't mean "sustained" when referring to a chord. The answer to your question is: It depends. Different people will use it to refer to either sus4 or 7sus4.


It really isn't a matter of belief. Theory is a descriptive system, and sus4 chords are chords in their own right in many genres. Certain genres have evolved in their own little worlds, and have refined methods of theoretical analysis that really only work correctly within that little world. Ask a classical composer to analyze a jazz piece, and you'll see what I mean. The genres have evolved separately, and have entirely differently goals when describing their music. Half of the chords used in jazz don't exist from the standpoint of a classical musician.



thanks that is good for TS more information is always good

i understand what you are saying and that is y i say some people not all