#1
Is there a list of chords that are very popular and ones that you should get familiar with? I have a flip chord book, but wanted to know if there are certain ones that one should know that are in a lot of songs.
#2
Major
Minor
Major 7th
7th


those are 4 different types of chords that are pretty basic that everyone should be familiar with.
#3
the hendrix chord (I believe it's like a dom.7#9)

|----|
|-8-|
|-7-|
|-6-|
|-7-|
|----|

it's not too common but it's pretty awesome
Last edited by qstionauthority at Aug 17, 2008,
#4
sus2 and sus4!!!!
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#5
power chords!
just kidding :P
you should know at very least major, major7, minor, minor7, dominant and 7 major, suspended, diminished, augmented... bla bla bla...
anything possible to know pretty much. knowledge doesn't hurt.
#7
Quote by KurtsJagStang93
Is there a list of chords that are very popular and ones that you should get familiar with? I have a flip chord book, but wanted to know if there are certain ones that one should know that are in a lot of songs.


Major, Minor, Maj7, Min7, Dom7, sus2, sus4.

Best thing to do is learn chord construction. Its a really simple concept to be honest. Also, learn the notes on the fret board so you can come up with your own voicings.
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#10
Quote by The_Sophist
Why don't you just learn all of them?

+1

learn the rules of chord construction and you can play any chord you want rather than having to memorise dozens of shapes.
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#11
Make it a goal to learn at least 5 voicings of the following chords (learn all of them based on the same root, then learn them based on another root):
major, minor, augmented, diminished, major 7th(maj7), minor 7th(m7, -7), dominant 7th(7), minor 7th with b5 (m7b5), diminished 7th (dim7, *7), minor/major 7th [m(maj7)], major 6th (6), minor 6th (m6), suspended 4th(sus4), suspended 2nd(sus2), dominant 7th suspended 4th (7sus4), major add 9 (add9), minor add 9 (madd9)

Once you really start analyzing the chords, you should be able to see how some voicings can be used to play several chords. It's a pretty large subject, so I won't go into detail here, but that knowledge can really open up your chordal playing.

And learning the rules of chord construction is definitely a must, as has already been said.
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#12
Quote by qstionauthority
the hendrix chord (I believe it's like a dom.7#9)

|----|
|-8-|
|-7-|
|-6-|
|-7-|
|----|

it's not too common but it's pretty awesome

apart from hendrix where else have you seen this chord? i have only ever seen it in hendrix stuff.
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#13
I think you can get by on just Major and Minor chords and if you see a chord you're unsure of look it up. And don't lay into me guys thats just my opinion, it may not be right but it is just an opinion. End of.
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#15
Quote by Conca
apart from hendrix where else have you seen this chord? i have only ever seen it in hendrix stuff.


Mainly blues artists... Stevie Ray Vaughan as example.
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#16
Quote by RCalisto
isn't looking up exactly the same as learning them? -.-

what i meant was look them up if and when you need them. sorry wasnt too clear
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#17
Quote by DarTHie
Mainly blues artists... Stevie Ray Vaughan as example.

o ok sorry dont really play any blues
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#18
Quote by KurtsJagStang93
Is there a list of chords that are very popular and ones that you should get familiar with? I have a flip chord book, but wanted to know if there are certain ones that one should know that are in a lot of songs.


I suggest you get familiar with the CAGED system... there are only 5 major chord shapes, everything else is derived from them, so why not learn that & how to derive an chord you want, rather than learning hundreds of shapes as separate entities?
#19
Quote by steven seagull
+1

learn the rules of chord construction and you can play any chord you want rather than having to memorise dozens of shapes.



shapes REINFORCE your knowledge of chord construction. They ALWAYS HELP, and NEVER HINDER your understanding.
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#20
Quote by DarTHie
Mainly blues artists... Stevie Ray Vaughan as example.


That's cuz Hendrix was such a huge influence on srv, and he basically copied Hendrix's style. Btw I'm a big fan of both.
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#21
Know your major chords. (1, 3, 5)
Know your minor chords. (1, b3, 5)
Know your augmented chords. (1, 3, #5)
Know your diminished chords. (1, b3, b5)

Know your dominant 7th chords.
Know your major 7th chords.
Know your minor 7th chords.
Know your augmented 7th chords.
Know your diminished 7th chords.
Know your half-diminished chords.

Know your power chords, both open styled and closed.

Know your suspended second.
Know your suspended fourth.

Know your add sixth, ninths, and elevenths.

Also know some seventh extensions and know how to simplify them. For instance: if you where to see a Cminor7add#9addb11, simplify it down to a Cminor7 etc.

It might benefit you to know the Dominant 7th #9 chord. (AKA the Hendrix Chord).
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#22
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Also know some seventh extensions and know how to simplify them. For instance: if you where to see a Cminor7add#9addb11, simplify it down to a Cminor7 etc.

That symbol makes no sense at all. You said: Cminor7add(#9)add(b11). A #9 is enharmonic with a b3, so that note contained in a minor 7th chord is just considered the minor 3rd. A b11 is enharmonic with a 3; furthermore, when both a b3 and a 3 are included in a chord, the b3 acts as a #9, so the symbol of the chord is misleading. That symbol that you gave should actually be C7#9 (C-E-G-Bb-D#).
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#23
Quote by titopuente
That symbol makes no sense at all. You said: Cminor7add(#9)add(b11). A #9 is enharmonic with a b3, so that note contained in a minor 7th chord is just considered the minor 3rd. A b11 is enharmonic with a 3; furthermore, when both a b3 and a 3 are included in a chord, the b3 acts as a #9, so the symbol of the chord is misleading. That symbol that you gave should actually be C7#9 (C-E-G-Bb-D#).


like... that was exactly his point?...
#26
Quote by Conca
apart from hendrix where else have you seen this chord? i have only ever seen it in hendrix stuff.


theres a little jazzy type turnaround thing somewhere on Dark Side of the Moon that uses it brilliantly