#1


Look, the key signature has a sharp at this note but there's a flat behind this. Is it the normal pitch now or is it flattened?
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#2
The key signature has an F#. That note is E, the flat makes it Eb.
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#3
The note is flat, because the sharp is an f#, while the flattened note is an eb.
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#4
Wait, noob mistake, I thought it was on the same line as the E. But now I realize the G scale has a F# and that has nothing to do with the E. Sorry
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#5
I wonder how long he's been thinking about that one.
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#6
Lol, yeah I'm tired
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#7
Quote by Puma89
I wonder how long he's been thinking about that one.

Was that necessary?

TS: Just in case this is still a question that could pop up in the future, let's say it was G major/E minor and you saw an Fb. You'd play an F natural, because the F# occurs in the key signature and the F# is flattened. You'd know to play an Fb if the note had a natural symbol and then a flat symbol in front of it (from left to right, natural symbol->flat symbol->note), because that means it becomes an F natural and then is flattened another half step.
#8
Quote by :-D
Was that necessary?

TS: Just in case this is still a question that could pop up in the future, let's say it was G major/E minor and you saw an Fb. You'd play an F natural, because the F# occurs in the key signature and the F# is flattened. You'd know to play an Fb if the note had a natural symbol and then a flat symbol in front of it (from left to right, natural symbol->flat symbol->note), because that means it becomes an F natural and then is flattened another half step.

No, you'd play Fb (E). Accidentals completely override the key signature. A natural sign would mean play F natural.
#9
Quote by Nightfyre
No, you'd play Fb (E). Accidentals completely override the key signature. A natural sign would mean play F natural.

Any other opinions/insight on this? That's not the way I learned it, but I could well be wrong.
#10
Quote by :-D
Any other opinions/insight on this? That's not the way I learned it, but I could well be wrong.

I'm sure there's a FAQ on this somewhere, but if I'm wrong about that after seven years of playing in classical ensembles (including some professional gigs; bassoon ftw!), there's a few people I know who need to answer some awkward questions.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Aug 17, 2008,
#11
If you see an Fb, regardless of key signature, you play Fb. The flat is relative to F natural, even if there is an F# in the key signature.

Apparently, a natural might be included to clear up any confusion, but it isn't necessary.
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#13
Quote by psychodelia
If you see an Fb, regardless of key signature, you play Fb. The flat is relative to F natural, even if there is an F# in the key signature.

Apparently, a natural might be included to clear up any confusion, but it isn't necessary.

Fuck.

Guess I was wrong.
#14
Quote by :-D
Any other opinions/insight on this? That's not the way I learned it, but I could well be wrong.


my opinion is... the other guy was right a flat sign isn't exactly shorthand for '-1 semitone'... it tells you what note to play

luckily this kind of thing doesn't appear very often... there can be very few circumstances where you want the note that's sharpened in the key signature to be flattened to a note that's enharmonically the same as one that's actually in the same key.. it'd be, well.. silly

and if you have to go throwing around accidentals, you generally try to go in the same direction as the key signature... you have to have a pretty good reason for using lots of flats in a sharp key, and vice versa ... the example given by the TS is justified though... (borrowing of the 4th chord from the parallel minor key)... in G... Cm
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Aug 17, 2008,
#15
Quote by :-D
Any other opinions/insight on this? That's not the way I learned it, but I could well be wrong.

He's right. Fb = Fb no matter what.
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#16
If there was a natural it would be F, Fb is Fb, no matter where you are. End of story

Quote by inflatablefilth
luckily this kind of thing doesn't appear very often... there can be very few circumstances where you want the note that's sharpened in the key signature to be flattened to a note that's enharmonically the same as one that's actually in the same key.. it'd be, well.. silly


Silly? SILLY?!

It means you're playing modern classical music, OR, old classical music. Some Mahler stuff does that, I think I even recall a few brilliant Mozart pieces that do it.

I love Classical music.
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Last edited by Auals at Aug 18, 2008,