#1
Hi,
this is most likely a amazingly stupid question and one I really should know the answer to already......but I'm looking into getting an LTD-ESP with a floyd rose on it and the bloke in the shop said to be careful to only change one string at a time otherwise the trem recesses into the body and messes up the set-up......He also said that this was valid with anything with a trem including a strat style one

Is this actually true? I ask, as I've always changed them all at once and conditioned the fretboard at the same time.......Also, if I can only change them one at a time how do I condition the fretboard properly?

Cheers for the help
#2
Yes, it is true. On a floyd rose trem, you should definitely change one at a time. As to the fretboard, just condition the space between each string is all I can recommend.
While looking at a guitar magazine with some friends.

Quote by Kaleb
DUDE! Is that a Mel Gibson?!



Quote by boreamor
Don't you understand the importance of correct spelling and grammar? It's the online symbol of maturity. And you as sure as hell don't have that.
#3
some people like to put something underneath the bridge so that it doesnt drop into the body so that you can condition the fretboard. i dont condition my fretboard on my ibanez rg4ex1 to much so i just do it one string at a time.

i hope that helps a bit.
#4
Thanks for the help guys!

I will be sure to only change them one at a time in future, I haven't done any irreversible damage , have I? And is it really that important on a strat style trem as it doesn't really recess into the body in the same way a Floyd Rose does?
#5
The Floyd rose is easy to change springs, I did it in 10 minutes with no prior experience. Just watch some videos on how to do it, or check at the local guitar shop.
Like podcasts? Listen to these!
BEER!
VIDEO GAMES!
MOVIES/GEEKY SHIT!

_______________________________________________
Last edited by zappp : Today at 4:20 PM. Reason: Suck on my balls, UG
#6
10 minutes?
Changing springs, (I'm assuming that's what you ment, or it's a typo), will take a short amount of time, but then you have to retune and everything.
Changing strings will take a little while, but longer than 10 minutes. Then you let them stretch, then retune, then stretch some, then retune ect ect ect until it stays in tune, then you're good. The whole proccess ussually takes a day, maybe too, including all the stretching of course.
#7
Quote by caraluzzo
10 minutes?
Changing springs, (I'm assuming that's what you ment, or it's a typo), will take a short amount of time, but then you have to retune and everything.
Changing strings will take a little while, but longer than 10 minutes. Then you let them stretch, then retune, then stretch some, then retune ect ect ect until it stays in tune, then you're good. The whole proccess ussually takes a day, maybe too, including all the stretching of course.


I didn't adjust the springs, mainly because I didn't change the gauge of said springs. Well, I just tune the springs, and pull on them, retune, pull, etc. until they stay in tune. Usually doesn't take long at all.
Like podcasts? Listen to these!
BEER!
VIDEO GAMES!
MOVIES/GEEKY SHIT!

_______________________________________________
Last edited by zappp : Today at 4:20 PM. Reason: Suck on my balls, UG
#8
First time I changed strings on a trem bridge, I didn't know about that and my bridge sunk into the body, lol. With some proper adjustment it is fixable without going to a shop, trust me. Just be patient and tweak the height.
hide your kids, hide your wife.

Quote by angus_young_32
I'd rather kill myself than commit suicide.


UG Hatecrew FTW
#9
Thanks again guys, there doesn't seem to be any problems with intonation or fret buzz and my guitars stay in tune for weeks at a time so I don't think there's any problems......but I'll definately be careful in the future......especially with the floyd rose!