#1
So... I decided to put up a short lesson about jazz chords since I was really bored.
Tell me what you think about it. Feel free to point out any mistakes, major or minor (Teeheehee I made a pun). There may be some chords that are a little wrong and/or a little information that is missing, I'm not quite sure. I completed this to the best of my ability, so fill me in on anything I'm missing.


Jazz Chords


Note about this lesson.

I created this lesson for beginning jazz players who are confused by all the different chords out there (I know I was when I started). I will be giving the parts for each chord, the shapes two variations on them with the root on the E string in one and on the A string in the second, and also how they are commonly notated. There are also many sections at the end for you to read through to get to know more about playing guitar in a jazz band, with tips on tone, sightreading, etc.

Quick Note About Jazz Chords

Playing jazz chords is not like strumming to a pop song at all. There are a few main differences that you, as a performer, need to pay attention to.

1) Most commonly, jazz voicings leave out the fifth, except in the case of augmented or dimished chords. This is because the perfect fifth gives virtually no extra definition to the chord. In all the voicings that I will present, the fifth is absent, so you won't need to worry about it.

2) Jazz chords are definitely more complex than the chords you would find in a pop song. 'Nuff said.

3) You have to pay extra attention and make sure that the chords you are strumming don't jump up and down too much. Meaning, if you have a Gmaj7 chord and you're playing it on the tenth fret of the A string, don't immediately go to an F#m7b5 chord with the root all the way at the 2nd fret of the E string. Use a higher voicing for the half diminished chord or a lower voicing for the maj7. See 'how to use these chords' for a better explanation


I'm going to assume that you already know the basic barre shapes for minor and major chords, so I will not list them here. Besides, they rarely pop up at all in jazz.

Now... let's get started!
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
Last edited by firebreath07 at Aug 17, 2008,
#2
Seventh Chords

Dominant Seventh - 1, 3, 5, b7

Dominant 7th chords are some of the most common chords you will see in jazz. They consist of the root, a major third, a perfect fifth, and a flatted seventh. The most interesting thing about this chord is the fact that it has a major triad but the third and flat seven make a tritone (diminished fifth). See the section about tritone substitution for more about this.

It is notated with a 7 after the letter of the root, with added intervals in parentheses. E.g.: A7

Dominant 7th chords are most commonly altered. So, I have included some of the most common alterations. Note that the suspended variant is sus4, as that is most common.


Normal


A7		 D7

e---	        e---
B---	        B---
G---	        G-5- b7
D-5- b7         D-4- 3
A-4- 3	        A-5- R
E-5- R	        E---


Sus

A7sus		D7sus

e---		 e---
B---		 B---
G---	         G-5- b7
D-5- b7	         D-5- 4
A-5- 4	         A-5- R
E-5- R 	         E--- 


#5

A7(#5)		D7(#5)

e---		 e---
B---		 B---
G---		 G-5- b7
D-5- b7		 D-8- #5
A-8- #5		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E--- 


b5

A7(b5)		D7(b5)

e---		e---
B---		B---
G---		G-5- b7
D-5- b7	        D-6- b5
A-6- b5		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

#9

A7(#9)		D7(#9)

e---		e---
B---		B-6- #9
G-5- #9		G-5- b7
D-5- b7		D-4- 3
A-4- 3		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

b9

A7(b9)		D7(b9)		

e---		e---
B---		B-4- b9
G-3- b9		G-5- b7
D-5- b7		D-4- 3
A-4- 3		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

#5/#9

A7(#5/#9)	D7(#5/#9)

e---		e---
B---		B-6- #9
G-5- #9		G-5- b7
D-5- b7		D-8- #5
A-8- #5		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

#5/b9

Quick note about this chord: It's absolutely IMPOSSIBLE to play the E-string root version (the A-string root is slightly easier, but still pretty impossible) unless you have 10-inch long fingers. My best advice to you if you ever do come across this chord is to 1) fake it or 2) choose either the #5 or b9 variant and play that. I'd suggest the #5. This goes for the A-string root version too if you find that too challenging. Good thing is, you rarely see this chord, if ever.

A7(#5/b9)	D7(#5/b9)

e---		e---
B---		B-4- b9
G-3- b9		G-5- b7
D-5- b7		D-8- #5
A-8- #5		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

#11

A #11 means the same thing as a b5 (it's an augmented 4th, which is enharmonically equivalent to a diminshed 5th). So just use the b5 voicing presented earlier. I've seen 7 chords marked with #11's before, so I decided to include them. However, the fact that this notation is even used strikes me as odd and sort of redundant, so there's probably something I'm missing, although playing the b5 version in place of #11 has worked fine for me.


Major Seventh - 1, 3, 5, 7

Major 7th chords are also very common, and sound very nice if used in the right spot. They consist of the root, a major third, a perfect fifth, and a seventh. It's also easy to finger.

They are most commonly notated with 'maj7' or M7 (E.g.: Amaj7, AM7) although sometimes you may see them notated with a little triangle with a seven after it.

Amaj7		Dmaj7

e---		 e---
B---		 B---
G---		 G-6- 7
D-6- 7		 D-4- 3
A-4- 3		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---


Minor Seventh - 1, m3, 5, b7

Minor 7th chords consist of the root, a minor third, a perfect fifth, and a flatted seventh. A little tricky to finger, but nothing that bad. The second voicing contains a perfect 5th, and is a slightly fuller and higher sounding version. It also happens to be easy to play, as the lower root can be ommitted. It's best used with another chord with a P5 in it (e.g. major triad). I really wouldn't recommend the A-string root version of it. It sticks out like a sore thumb in an ensemble.

They are notated as 'min7' or just 'm7'. E.g.: Amin7, Am7

Amin7		Dmin7

e---		 e---
B---		 B---
G---		 G-5- b7
D-5- b7		 D-3- m3
A-3- m3		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

e-5- R		 e-5- P5
B-5- P5		 B-6- m3
G-5- m3	         G-5- b7
D-5- b7          D---
A---		 A-5- R
E-5- (R)	 E---



Sixth Chords

Major Sixth - 1, 3, 5, 6

The root, a major third, a perfect fifth, and a sixth. A nice little chord that sounds best without the fifth.

Notated just with a '6' after the root. E.g.: A6

A6		D6

e---		e---
B---		B---
G---		G-4- 6
D-4- 6	        D-4- 3
A-4- 3	        A-5- R
E-5- R	        E---

Minor Sixth - 1, b3, 5, 6

The root, a minor third, a perfect fifth, and a sixth. A little less common than the major sixth, but it's out there.

Notated with an 'min6' or 'm6' after the root. E.g.: Am6, Amin6

Amin6		Dmin6

e---		 e---
B---		 B---
G---		 G-4- 6
D-4- 6		 D-3- m3
A-3- m3		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

Ninth Chords

Dominant Ninths - 1, 3, 5, b7, 9

The root, a major third, a perfect fifth, a flatted seventh, and a ninth. These are very common chords.

Notated with '9' after the root. E.g.: A9

A9		D9

e---		e---
B---		B-5- 9
G-4- 9	        G-5- b7
D-5- b7	        D-4- 3
A-4- 3	        A-5- R
E-5- R	        E---

Major Ninths - 1, 3, 5, 7, 9

The root, a major third, a perfect fifth, a seventh, and a ninth. Not as common as the dominant ninth, but they're out there. It's a little hard to play, especially the A-string root version, so if you can't do it you can always omit the root.

Notated as 'maj9' or 'M9'. E.g.: Amaj9, AM9

Amaj9		Dmaj9
 
e---		 e---
B---		 B-5- 9
G-4- 9		 G-6- 7
D-6- 7		 D-4- 3
A-4- 3		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

Minor Ninths - 1, m3, 5, b7, 9

The root, a minor third, a perfect fifth, a flatted seventh, and a ninth. Again, rarely found, but I've seen them.

Notated as 'min9' or 'm9'. E.g.: Amin9, Am9

Amin9		Dmin9

e---		 e---
B---		 B-5- 9
G-4- 9		 G-5- b7
D-5- b7		 D-3- m3
A-3- m3		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

6/9 Chord

Major 6/9 - 1, 3, 5, 6, 9

Basically just a major triad with a sixth and ninth added.

Notated with a 6 on top of a 9, as '6/9', as '6add9', or 'add6add9'. E.g.: A6/9, A6add9, Aadd6add9

A6/9		D6/9

e---		e---
B---		B-5- 9
G-4- 9		G-4- 6
D-4- 6		D-4- 3
A-4- 3		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

Eleventh Chords

I cannot begin to say how much I despise these chords. I just replace them with the corresponding 13th chord (next section) whenever I see them. Which really isn't that much; these are some of the rarest chords you will find. So, I will NOT tab out the shapes for you.

Thirteenth Chords

Quick note: Playing 13th chords is tricky, because guitarists can't really hit all the parts, even if we do leave out the fifth. By playing the root, third, seventh, and thriteenth, you keep the feel of the 13th chord without making it too difficult. However, these all sound very high, so if you do see them, make sure to move your other chords up to the same register (see 'how to use these chords').

Dominant Thirteenth - 1, 3, 5, b7, 9, 11, 13

The most common 13th chord you will find. The root, major third, perfect fifth, a ninth, an eleventh, and a thirtheenth.

Notated as '13'. E.g.: A13

A13		D13

e---		e-7- 13
B-7- 13	        B-7- 3
G-6- 3	        G-5- b7
D-5- b7	        D---
A---	        A-5- R
E-5- R	        E---

Major Thirteenth - 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13

These are pretty rare, but you might actually run into one of these in some pieces. Basically a dominant 13th with a major 7th.

Notated as 'maj13' or 'M13'. E.g.: Amaj13, AM13

Amaj13		Dmaj13

e---		  e-7- 13
B-7- 13		  B-7- 3
G-6- 3		  G-6- 7
D-6- 7		  D---
A---		  A-5- R
E-5- R		  E---

Minor Thirtheenth - 1, m3, 5, b7, 9, 11, 13

Again, these are rare, but you can find them. A dominant 13th with a minor 3rd.

Notated as 'min13' or 'm13'. E.g.: Amin13, Am13

Amin13		Dmin13

e---		 e-7- 13
B-7- 13		 B-6- m3
G-5- m3		 G-5- b7
D-5- b7		 D---
A---		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

Diminished Chords

Half Diminished - 1, m3, b5, b7

In this case, it is absolutely necessary to play the 5th. You CANNOT leave it out. It consists of the root, a minor 3rd, a diminished fifth, and a flat seventh.

Notated as 'm7b5'. E.g.: Am7b5

Am7b5		Dm7b5

e---		 e---
B---		 B-6- m3
G-5- m3		 G-5- b7
D-5- b7		 D-6- b5
A-6- b5		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

Diminished Seventh - 1, m3, b5, bb7

Like a half diminished chord, except the 7 is doubly flat (enharmonically equivalent to a sixth). A VERY dissonant chord.
The m3 in the E-string root version is hard to get. If you can get it, you're amazing. If not, don't worry about it.

Notated as 'dim7' or with a circle with a slash through it. E.g.: Adim7

Adim7		Ddim7

e---		 e---
B---		 B-6- m3
G-5- (m3)	 G-4- bb7
D-4- bb7	 D-6- b5
A-6- b5		 A-5- R
E-5- R		 E---

Augmented Chords

I have NEVER seen these chords before. EVER. So, I'm not going to bother finding out how to play them, as I don't know at this moment. If you do see one, replace it with a dominant 7th #5 or something, as that's the same thing as an augmented seventh chord.

They are normally notated with a plus or 'aug'. E.g.: A+, Aaug

DAMN that was a lot of formatting!!!!


OK... now that I've listed all the chords you're most likely to run into, now I can talk about how to apply your new knowledge.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#3
(chords, continued)...
Minor-Major Chords

Minor-Major Seventh - 1, m3, 5, 7

Essentially a major 7th stacked on a minor triad. A not-so-common chord, but it's out there.

Notated as "min(maj7)" or as a triangle with a dash before it. E.g.: Amin(maj7)

Amin(maj7)	Dmin(maj7)

e---		e---
B---		B---
G---		G-6- 7
D-6- 7		D-7- m3 
A-7- m3		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

Minor-Major Ninth - 1, m3, 5, 7, 9

A 7th and a 9th stacked on a minor triad. I've actually never seen this chord.

Notated as "min(maj9)" most of the time. There are too many other varieties, so I won't list them. E.g.: Amin(maj9)

Amin(maj9)	Dmin(maj9)

e---		e---
B---		B-5- 9
G-4- 9		G-6- 7
D-6- 7		D-7- m3
A-7- m3		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---

Minor-Major 13th - 1, m3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13

Major 7, 9, 11, and 13 stacked on a minor triad. I've never seen this chord also, and I actually doubt it exists. But for the sake of completion, I'll put it in.

Amin(maj13)	Dmin(maj13)

e---		e-7- 13
B-7- 13		B-6- m3
G-5- m3		G-6- 7
D-6- 7		D---
A---		A-5- R
E-5- R		E---



How to Use These Chords

OK... now you know (or should in any case) all the shapes for the chords mentioned above for a root of A and a root of D.
Now you can take a break, because that is no small accomplishment. I have been playing jazz rhythm guitar for about as long as I have played guitar, and I still have some trouble occasionally. It's a long learning process.

Now, in a song you're not going to only run into chords with A and D as root notes. So what do you do? Well, the answer should be obvious:

SLIDE THESE SHAPES UP AND DOWN THE NECK ACCORDING TO THE ROOT NOTE
SLIDE THESE SHAPES UP AND DOWN THE NECK ACCORDING TO THE ROOT NOTE
SLIDE THESE SHAPES UP AND DOWN THE NECK ACCORDING TO THE ROOT NOTE

I have to say it three times because that is so important. That's also why you have to have a very clear grasp on what notes are on which frets of the low E and A strings, as those are the two strings where 99% of the roots are located.

LEARN THE NOTES ON THE E AND A STRINGS UP TO THE 12TH FRET
LEARN THE NOTES ON THE E AND A STRINGS UP TO THE 12TH FRET
LEARN THE NOTES ON THE E AND A STRINGS UP TO THE 12TH FRET

It's that important. You don't need to learn any notes after the 12th really, since it's kind of redundant and chords sound really bad up there.

So, now you know basically all the chords you'll ever run into. Now you have to make them fit together. That means, don't jump up and down octaves. Let's take the progression from "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea" by Harold Arlen as an example.

Fmaj7 | Gmin9 C13 |

Those are the first two bars. Now, you have two ways of playing Fmaj7: 1)On the 1st fret of the E string or 2)On the 8th fret of the A string.

There are also two ways of playing Gmin9: 1)On the 3rd fret of the E string or 2)On the 10th fret of the A string.

And finally, there are two ways of playing C13: 1)On the 8th fret of the E string or 2)On the 3rd fret of the A string. Now the unique thing about this chord is that both positions sound the same, and the 13th is pretty high. You can't shift the chord down an octave, so you have to play the other two chords higher to compensate. Makes sense right?


Chords Not Mentioned

I did not mention normal suspended chords, nor did I mention the sus2 variant for the dominant 7th chord, mainly because they are rare and I haven't seen them yet, so I don't know how to play them.

I also did not mention altered bass chords, so I will now. Altered bass chords are just that: they are chords with root notes different from what they normally are. They are notated with the bass note after the chord name with a slash.

For example, D7/A means to play a D7 chord but also play an A as the lowest note. If you think you can nail these chords, by all means do so. If not, then don't bother, because most of the time the bass will be hitting those notes. In some cases though, it is important to hit these altered bass notes. Take for example "It Don't Mean a Thing" by Duke Ellington.

Gmin7 Gmin7/F# | Gmin7/F Gmin7/E |

Those are the first two bars, and it is absolutely imperative that you hit all of those altered bass notes, or else you won't have that chromatic descension feel that's supposed to be there. Plus, if you play a Gmin7 throughout, you'll clash with the bass, especially on the Gmin7/F#.

Really, just use your better judgement to determine when to hit the bass notes if you can, and when to just skip them for simplicity's sake.

And... polychords. They are kind of like chords stacked on top of each other, and are notated with slashes. I 1)have no idea how to sightread these, 2)don't know how to play them at all, and 3)am too lazy to look them up and tab them, as there can be so many different combinations. So that's one thing you're going to have to figure out on your own.

Tritone Substitution

This neat little technique works with dominant seventh chords. Basically, you replace the original dom7 with another dom7 a tritone away from the original.

That's kind of hard to wrap your mind around, so I will present an example. Take a basic ii-V-I progression in the key of G major:

Am7 | D7 | Gmaj7

You can replace the D7 with a Ab7. This causes a chromatic root movement, which may or may not be desirable, depending on what you're playing.

The reason this works is because the 3rd and 7th in both chords are reversed and still form a tritone. The third in D7 is F# and the seventh C. The third in Ab7 is C and the seventh is Gb/F#.

The ii-V-I progression becomes a ii-V(sub)-I progression when you apply tritone substitution.

Just use your better judgement to decide when to substitute a chord. If you think the song could use with a little quick dissonance, then go ahead and substitute. If not, keep to the original progression.


Ensemble Tips

1) Try to play chords on lower frets. In my opinion, chords sound best when the root note is on the 3-8th frets. Playing chords up high all the time will make you stick out, and that's not good if you're playing rhythm.
2) Set your guitar for a jazz tone. Keeping tone at 10 will make you stick out like a sore thumb. Keep tone at around 4 and volume at 7. Don't put roll your tone knob back beyond 4 as that will make your sound muddy. 7 volume complements that tone nicely, and if it's not loud enough, compensate with your amp.
3) You're not the most important part in the group, especially if you're not soloing. Most of the time people should barely be able to hear you.

Sightreading

If you find yourself in front of a new piece of music, don't panic. If it's in an audition, still don't panic. Look at the main progression and see if it repeats. If it does, then that's good. If not, then break the song up into blocks. Figure out what you can, and go from there. If there is a chord that you really don't know, replace it with something similar (e.g. Gmin13 -> Gmin7 or Gmin9). If you can't do that, play a power chord on the root note. It'll sound horrible, but at least you're playing something. It takes a long time to be able to sightread a song perfectly on the first try, so if you don't do so well, it's still something of an accomplishment.

Suggested Songs

Fly Me To the Moon
Autumn Leaves (a must know)
Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
It Don't Mean a Thing
Satin Doll
It's Only a Paper Moon
Summertime

And if you're feeling adventurous, try Over the Rainbow. It's an EXTRAORDINARILY complex song with many different chords. I still have trouble with it after 2 weeks.

You can find the majority of these songs in the "Just Jazz Real Book" or a similar fakebook. Others you could probably find here on UG. If not, contact me and I could post up the chords.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
Last edited by firebreath07 at Aug 18, 2008,
#4
And so, I'll leave you with the original text document that I typed up on Notepad. Actually, that was the reason why I had to do so much formatting; I used tabs, so everything ended up being real screwy. Now, if you wanted to print this (the thread I mean), you'd have a little trouble (I checked) with formatting. So this is for anyone who wishes to print this mini-lesson out.

Yeah... have fun.

EDIT: I've updated this file with minor-major chords now.
Attachments:
jazzchords.txt
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
Last edited by firebreath07 at Aug 18, 2008,
#5
first of all,i must appreciate the work you`ve put into that,thanks a lot.
now i`ll try to help you and improve it..
some things i suggest you`ll fix\add :
1) in the quick notes about jazz,where you talked about how the 5th isnt important,unless it`s altered. i suggest you`ll also write that the root itself isnt so important either... especially if you`re playin` with a bassist.

2)as for the #5/b9 chords,they are playable on 6th string position,i tried
A7(#5/b9) and used this fingering: second finger,pinky,third finger,first finger.
its a strech,but a possible one (if not,practice :P ).

3)as for the augumented chords.. like you said,just a plain 7th chord,with the 5th raised half a tone. (important note,this chord does not contain both 5th and #5th,just the #5th)

4) i think its also important to make a note about altered chords,and how to form them.
for an example,if we have C13b5#9,then we must obey to some rules:
the chord MUST include the notes written in the chord name,in that case, the 13,
the b5 and the #9,then we add the must have 7th and 3rd. (but thats obvious)

that`s what i found the meanwhile
overall, a fantastic job!!

edit:
5) you forgot to put in the minor-major 7 chords section.
i persume you know it,but just in case thats the formula (1-b3-5-7)
and of course it goes the same with the extensions (CmMAJ11,etc`)
6) in the 13 chords,the examples for the D13 chords are wrong.. i mean the tab.. you wrote the 5th instead of the 13 (in the position,you write fret 7 is the 13th,while its actually the fifth,just change the fret number to 9)
Last edited by becker89 at Aug 17, 2008,
#8
yes you do.. i guess he just showed lower neck positions for the sake of just showing the chord notes,or just showing any position.
#9
=O

Oh yeah, I forgot Major-Minors. I'll put that up tomorrow, I'm a little busy right now.

EDIT:

Quote by Guitar Guy21
Don't you usually play the chords on the D, G, B, and E strings?


The body of the chords will be found mainly on the 4 highest strings, but the root notes should always go on either the A or E strings because anything higher makes your guitar stick out in an ensemble, which is not what you should be looking for. You want your sound to blend nicely in, and the best way to do that is to play chords that are low.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
Last edited by firebreath07 at Aug 17, 2008,
#11
Nice lesson. But...

I've seen Augmented chords used heaps, especially augmented sevenths. I might post some of my favourite voicings.

Also, I've noticed alot of your voicings only use 3 or 4 strings. My band co-ordinator usually encourages me to use as many strings as possible. I wouldnt really know if thats common, but I'm putting it out there.

And mention some pima picking. Alot of chords sounds best using pima.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
Nice lesson. But...

I've seen Augmented chords used heaps, especially augmented sevenths. I might post some of my favourite voicings.

Also, I've noticed alot of your voicings only use 3 or 4 strings. My band co-ordinator usually encourages me to use as many strings as possible. I wouldnt really know if thats common, but I'm putting it out there.

And mention some pima picking. Alot of chords sounds best using pima.



Oh OK, I guess + chords aren't really as rare as I thought. I guess I'll put them up with maj/min chords.

As for the fact that a lot of my voicings contain only 3 or 4 parts, that's because without the 5th, for most chords that's all you need. Plus, it gives the chord a nice laid-back kind of feel. I guess it's up to the performer to add extra parts at this point.

And I'm not quite sure what you mean by mentioning fingerpicking... do you mean explaining the technique?
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#14
Firebreath, nice lesson! Thanks, you've obviously put a lot of work into this and it has definitely paid off

I think demonofthenight meant you could mention that chords also sound nice fingerpicked - correct me if I'm wrong, though. Personally, I don't think that's necessary, but I might suggest mentioning for the beginner that the chord shapes can be used to help visualise chord tone/arpeggiated ideas when soloing - maybe fairly obvious but not everyone seems to think of chords as shapes for lead playing straight away.
#15
Alright, I decided not to put in + chords. I did put in minor-majors though.

Unless someone wants to put up the voicings that they like to use, I'm just way to lazy to tab them out.

Anyways, I may submit this as a lesson, but first:

1)Is it good enough?
2)How do you submit a lesson anyways? I only see "submit an article" on the homepage.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#20
Quote by firebreath07
=O
The body of the chords will be found mainly on the 4 highest strings, but the root notes should always go on either the A or E strings because anything higher makes your guitar stick out in an ensemble, which is not what you should be looking for. You want your sound to blend nicely in, and the best way to do that is to play chords that are low.

If your playing with a bass player, which you probably would be if your playing in an ensemble, you wouldn't play the root notes anyways.
#21
Quote by one vision
I'm printing this out and putting it my reference binder. Did you copyright it somehow? I'm not asking so I can plagarize , just in case I have to show it to anyone...they'll know it's not my work.


Nah, you can copy it around and pass it around as much as you want. I don't care.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#23
So I just submitted this as a lesson called "jazz chords," hopefully it will be up.

Thanks for all the suggestions and stuff people.


and sorry for reviving a dead thread
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#24
Quote by firebreath07
So I just submitted this as a lesson called "jazz chords," hopefully it will be up.

Thanks for all the suggestions and stuff people.


and sorry for reviving a dead thread


Also, which "Over the Rainbow" are you refering to?

The Israel Kuwakuwahawaii one? Or the Cassidy or Garland one?