#1
you know,its funny,but most people who ever picked a guitar,including those who dont know how to play,end up on playing quite an advanced chord(theoratically speaking).
im talking of course about Em7Add11. (r-b3-5-b7-11) or more specific (E-G-B-D-A)
which is basically strumming all the 6 strings,played open (standard tuning)

actually i dont know if there is point to this thread... just a thought.
i actually used that knowledge when i taught a friend of mine to play guitar.
he told me he knew just 2 chords (C and Em), i told him he knew 3.
#2
nah, a low E power chord is the most used chord ever (at least in metal )
#3
He might be able to play three but that doesn't mean he knew it... Think about it.

He could now a hundred chords, just playing random 2 or more notes together, he just wouldn't be able to name or understand them.
#6
i would say the d5 in drop d tuning is, just because of modern rock, thats all they do....


not that i dont like modern rock...
Be still my heart, I hear your back cracking...


...sounds like music to me
#7
Quote by SNAbadboy
He might be able to play three but that doesn't mean he knew it... Think about it.

He could now a hundred chords, just playing random 2 or more notes together, he just wouldn't be able to name or understand them.


i know,but the beauty is that specific chord is so basic as far as it goes fretting (none)
i still think its the most played chord,most of the times unknown to the player of course..
#8
I strum my guitar open maybe once every time I play it.

I'm going to say E, because it'sas popular as A, or C, or D, or G, but it's also the most used barre chord shape.
#10
I'd say D. Its just so...playable!
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#12
i'd definitely say all open strings too lol. i'm doing that all the time. whenever i get bored of practicing and what not, i just strum that out of tedium lol.
i had never thought of that actually, good point.
#13
Quote by RCalisto
i'd definitely say all open strings too lol. i'm doing that all the time. whenever i get bored of practicing and what not, i just strum that out of tedium lol.
i had never thought of that actually, good point.


?haha, really?
Standard Fender Telecaster
Fender Blues Jr
Ibz10
#16
A chord technically just two or more notes sounded in harmony. I know it is usually considered three or more but I have heard many times that it is just two or more notes. Thus a power chord would be a chord.
#17
C, G, or A
Quote by Eliyahu
Mr.Cuddles killed The Metal!!!! FUCK YES!

Quote by TheReverend724
Mr Cuddles pretty much nailed it...

Quote by thanksgiving

"Oh Mr.Cuddles, you make my pants go boom boom. I are horny. Do not disappoint I"


Viscara (my band)
#18
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
A chord technically just two or more notes sounded in harmony. I know it is usually considered three or more but I have heard many times that it is just two or more notes. Thus a power chord would be a chord.

Nope, it's three or more. Two notes is just a dyad, which is simply a harmonic interval and not a chord. It's not "considered" to be the norm, that's actually the definition of a chord.
#19
Powerchords also hold no harmonic dissonance, or emotion at all, which is pretty much the point of chords.
#20
Quote by The_Sophist
Powerchords also hold no harmonic dissonance, or emotion at all, which is pretty much the point of chords.

Well, emotion is subjective anyway (though I know what you mean), so there's no way to pinpoint the "point of chords" other than to create harmony; I'm just going with the actual definition of the term.
#21
probably C or E. very common chords and used in pretty much anything. and in blues, almost every song is in E. a lot of rock songs are in E as well. and i know country/folk players do alot of C,F,G stuff. plus C major is a very used key. so id say its probably one of those two.
#22
Id say its B, most of pentatonic scales have it.
(Actually, I dont know how to write "pentatonic" or "pentathonic".. or however it is... i speak spanish).
#23
Quote by The_Sophist
Powerchords also hold no harmonic dissonance, or emotion at all, which is pretty much the point of chords.


"u phaylezor lulz lulz omfgbbqsos!!!!!11!!!!! one oNe one!!1"

no but seriously, this statement fails. its up to the listener to determine "emotion" if you don't feel any from a powerchord then thats fine, but to say they "hold no emotion at all" as though it is a factual statement, thats simply inaccurate. i use a lot of powerchords in my music and i feel that they have a considerable amount of emotion.

but for the topic at hand i can't pinpoint specifically which chord is used the most, i'd probably say G,C,D or Am since about a billion songs have been written using those chords. although currently music is more guitar driven so there have been more songs using the open E / drop D type chords before the early 1900's music was mostly orchestrated for many instruments and C was a pretty common key going all the way back to the classical era which is why i pick the 4 chords i did.

music history, its the one class i showed up to in high school.
#24
The CAGED poistion E major chord is what everyone plays when they first pick up a guitar, so that's my vote.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Aug 18, 2008,
#27
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Im with those who said E5 powerchord which is a chord because its 3 notes.


It is not three notes. The very definition of a 5th chord is that it is a root and the fifth only. Adding the octave does not make it three notes, it only doubles the root.
#28
Quote by :-D
Nope, it's three or more. Two notes is just a dyad, which is simply a harmonic interval and not a chord. It's not "considered" to be the norm, that's actually the definition of a chord.



Actually, a dyad may be considered to be a chord.

Although it is typically called a dyad like you said and not a chord. I'm just pointing out that a dyad can be considered a chord.
Last edited by Nacho Cheese! at Aug 18, 2008,
#30
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Im with those who said E5 powerchord which is a chord because its 3 notes.



It's 2 notes.

Nacho Cheese: A dyad cannot correctly be considered a chord, sorry.
#32
A C major chord. No sharps or flats in the key, very simple and logical to understand. It was the first chord I played, and a lot of basic songs or basic ideas seem based around or off it.

Also, on the powerchord thing, it cannot be a full chord until it establishes a root (1) a major/minor tonality (3) and a fifth (5). Powerchords are root, fifths, and octaves, no real tonality there. Just a harmonization with a perfect fifth and an octave. So powerchords=/=real chords
#35
Quote by :-D


It's 2 notes.

Nacho Cheese: A dyad cannot correctly be considered a chord, sorry.


That is what you think. This is a largely debated topic in music theory. Some considered it two or more notes for a chord some consider it three or more. Debating is pointless as both are correct. If you don't believe me on this topic, of both being right, do some research.

I'll help you some:

Two or more notes

Three or more