#1
I'm thinking about changing my classic guitar.
Buying Acoustic Strings and changing the Tuners.
I'm still thinking on putting some Screws on the bridges after changing it abit.

Do you think it's a good change?
#2
im no expert , but if i were you,i`d just buy an acoustic guitar,and keep my classical guitar..
#3
I'll explain it simply. Guitar strings - 12$
New Tuners - Another 12$.
Acoustic Guitar 150$ +.
#4
i guessed it had to do with money..
in that case,i have no clue..maybe someone who did it could help you
but again,i`d rather play on the classical,and save money for a while..
#6
so you're going to put steel strings on a classical guitar?

bad idea, i do remember seeing a picture of the bridge ripping right out of the top of the guitar, and another one with the neck snapped in half from putting steel strings on it.

i don't believe there is a truss rod for the classical.
Schecter Diamond Series C-1 Elite
Roland Cube 30x
Blueridge BR-143
#8
Putting steel strings on a classical guitar will destroy your guitar.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#9
The neck of the classical guitar CANNOT handle the tension of steel strings. The neck WILL snap.

DO NOT DO IT! Classical guitars were meant for nylon strings. So does Acoustic guitars were made for steel string.
#10
Quote by NirvanaFan!
I'm thinking about changing my classic guitar.
Buying Acoustic Strings and changing the Tuners.
I'm still thinking on putting some Screws on the bridges after changing it abit.

Do you think it's a good change?


Bad idea. Don't you do it. A classical guitar cannot be changed into an acoustic so easily. Acoustic guitar are made to withstand about 150lbs of pressure from the pull of the strings. Classical guitars are under 50lbs. There is no way that you could possibly do that without destroying your guitar.

If you do try to modify your guitar as how you've explained it, it could potentially be dangerous to you. Putting a screw in the bridge will do next to nothing. The pressure could still rip off the bridge regardless... and not only will you cause damage the top of the guitar, the bridge could go flying off and hurt you. The neck joint could also potentially snap in half.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Quote by captivate
Bad idea. Don't you do it. A classical guitar cannot be changed into an acoustic so easily. Acoustic guitar are made to withstand about 150lbs of pressure from the pull of the strings. Classical guitars are under 50lbs. There is no way that you could possibly do that without destroying your guitar.

If you do try to modify your guitar as how you've explained it, it could potentially be dangerous to you. Putting a screw in the bridge will do next to nothing. The pressure could still rip off the bridge regardless... and not only will you cause damage the top of the guitar, the bridge could go flying off and hurt you. The neck joint could also potentially snap in half.


So captivate's saying that your risking BOTH your face AND your guitar. So, just get an acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have their uses, too. It's Classical guitar that taught me how to get started on fingerstyle and it's Acoustic guitar that is teaching me how to fingertap... XD Pretttyyyy tricky.. I must say.. mmkkaayyy.. off-topic. sorry mahn!
#12
Quote by ToOYOoT
So captivate's saying that your risking BOTH your face AND your guitar. So, just get an acoustic guitar.


ahahaha. yea. that's pretty much the jist of what i was trying to say.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.