#1
I'm looking up how to make dark chords that sound dissonant. Just a note before I start anything... I'm not looking to know them to make a whole album sound evil. I'm looking for how to make chords that sound almost demonic. The kind you'd use in a haunted house. I'm planning on writing something on piano, and then transfering to guitar. It is just like one or two chords... nothing much (at most 3 seconds of music?)

So I know how to make Major/Minor/Augmented/Diminished Triads. Diminished sounds closer to what I want, but it's not quite at it.

I think if you play a note, the sharp and the note (like C and C#) being played together might create a dissonant set of sounds, or maybe it was a C and Cb, I forget.


So, is there a way to make a dark sounding chord that isn't a power chord? Do dissonant chords even exist (I know its a sound used to describe things that need resolving, or haven't reached consonance yet). Is there any chromatic values that go well together to create an eerie sound?

As usual, tablature would be nice, and you don't need to give me a million examples. I just need some theory or interval examples and that would be great
Thanks.
: )
#2
e----------------------------------------------|
B----W------------------pear----------------|
G----------------------------------------------|
D------------lolwut--------------------------|
A----------------------------------------------|
E------------------------------------k-koo---| <-- let ring

Sorry, I can't help you
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Last edited by sam_brault at Aug 17, 2008,
#3
Try looking up tabs for bands that use those kinda chords
I've always like

B--14
G--17

And that can be pretty much moved anywhere on the fretboard
#5
Quote by sam_brault
e----------------------------------------------|
B----W------------------pear----------------|
G----------------------------------------------|
D------------lolwut--------------------------|
A----------------------------------------------|
E------------------------------------k-koo---| <-- let ring

Sorri, i can't help you

*reported*

TS: Try madd9 chords with the ninth and third spaced a half step apart, like this Emadd9 voicing:


e-0-
B-0-
G-0-
D-4-
A-2-
E-0-
#7
Quote by jim morrison714
use lots of tritones


This!
Rag Mop Do Do Duh DoDo Dedo Do!!!!!

R_A_G_G_M_O_P_P

RAGMOP
#8
Tritones!

Take a power chord, then lower the fifth by a semitone.

----------------7--------
-------------6-----------
----------4--------------
-------3-----------------
----2--------------------
-1-----------------------

The ultimate tritone^^^^^^^

Just move that around. That will give you the demonic sound you want.

Also consider using some semitones. Like:


------------------------
------------------------
------------------------
------------------------
----0------0--------------
-4------6---------------- etc.
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#9
I love doing this! I'm always screwing around with different chords and stuff trying to see how evil I can make it sound. I've found that variations of the diminished chords, tritones, 2nds, adding major notes to minor chords, the thing with stacking chromatic notes you mentioned (it has a name, I forgot what it's called) and generally screwing around with things that don't really make sense are all good ways to come up with some very dissonant or evil chords.
#10
Quote by :-D
*reported*

TS: Try madd9 chords

Yeah, I find madd9 chords very dissonant. My favorite transition is dim - madd9 - minor.

e - 0
B - 3
G - 2
D - 3

Not exactly correctly laid out with regards to classical theory, but it sounds nice. Dmadd9.

EDIT: For intense crazy chords, check out JS Bach. His famous Toccata and Fugue has some good ones, or his Passacaglia in Cm.
#13
^I lol'd
Quote by Cjk10000
Diminished sounds closer to what I want, but it's not quite at it.
Have you tried full diminished chords or half diminished chords?

Personally, I think a chord sounds dark because of how its used in a progression. Maybe you should be studying the progressions of songs you believe are dark?
#16
maybe #4 chords (or #11)
The augmented 4th is dissonant with the root, and the minor second (#4-P5) is also dissonant...

Maybe add another minor second there (maybe a diminished 7 as well).
Then you have for instance Amb9#11(bb7)???

EDIT:THe chord I mean would be:

E-6
B-4
G-5
D-4
A-7
E-5
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 18, 2008,
#17
Quote by s7706
e-9
b-8
g-7

is a personal fave.

D - G - C#

DMaj7sus4 (No 5)? Is that what it would be called? I came across the same one, in a different key, and if someone could verify this name or give me a more fitting one, that'd be great.
#18
Yeah I think Maj7sus4 is the correct name for it. It is most commonly seen as:

e-11
b-10
g-9

(Emaj7sus4)

If you combine this chord with Em it sounds great.

e-7
b-8
g-9
#20
Quote by McCheese
d-7
a-5

to

d-8
a-4

Is pretty dark. Not sure of the theory behind it but it sounds very dissonant and dark, probably because of the semitone movements.


That is an awesomely dark interval! I'm sure i have heard that in films.
#21
Quote by s7706
That is an awesomely dark interval! I'm sure i have heard that in films.


Yeah i think I've heard it used a lot in black/death metal or similar stuff. I wouldn't know for sure though as I don't really listen to/play it.

And yeah, tritones are your friend. There's a reason they used to be considered satanic
#23
There's a reason they used to be considered satanic


They were never considered Satanic.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#24
Maybe not satanic but it was considered evil. do a search in wikipedia for "Tritone" or google.

From Wiki...

"The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music") has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa, which the ancients called 'Satan in music'", while Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[3] Although both of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[4] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:"
#26
If you want a really evil chord try this

play the 8th(C) fret on the low E, play the 4th(C#) fret on the A, and play the open D.

There you have C, C#, D

Not sure what you would call it A2adddim2. Basically it is three semitones apart.

And the Major seventh interval is quite dissonant.

Augmented chords are fairly dissonant too.
#27
b9 and b9b13 chords are dissonant. For example C7b9 - C,E,G,Bb,Db or C7b9b13 - C,E,G,Bb,Db,Ab
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#28
how about... you all suck cuz apparently none of you have looked into music theory. with the slightest bit of research you can find that anything diminished, augemented, or note clusters (consecutive notes) sound dark.
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#29
Quote by brush200400
how about... you all suck cuz apparently none of you have looked into music theory. with the slightest bit of research you can find that anything diminished, augemented, or note clusters (consecutive notes) sound dark.

A. Many of us have "looked into" music theory.

B. It's a "tone cluster", not a "note cluster".

C. Context is much more important than individual chords; jazz uses a lot of chords your definition would consider "dark" but doesn't sound as such because of the progressions.
#30
Quote by :-D
A. Many of us have "looked into" music theory.

B. It's a "tone cluster", not a "note cluster".

C. Context is much more important than individual chords; jazz uses a lot of chords your definition would consider "dark" but doesn't sound as such because of the progressions.
A. Your signature holds true

B. Tone clusters sound like shit