#1
Hey, I've always wanted to know what the highest note is that I can sing. And lowest of course, but here's the thing: I don't know how. I have no idea about octaves and that stuff. How do you guys know which notes you can hit? Do you use some sort of software on the computer?

Please respond quickly. I'm very grateful for answers
#3
Guitar pro

If you have a guitar just play notes while trying to sing it
#5
Sing into a tuner or record it and analyse the frequencies or sing along with an instrument.
#6
Hit a note with your voice then fiddle around with a guitar or piano or something till you find a tone that matches.
#7
I agree. A piano/keyboard or a tuner would work best. Just match the pitch to whatever note your playing.
#8
Quote by fhqwgads
I agree. A piano/keyboard or a tuner would work best. Just match the pitch to whatever note your playing.


Okay, I'm not very good with what notes on the guitar is called either, I just know the songs. Not traditionally schooled, picked up it on my own and don't know what things called. I do have a chromatic tuner for my guitar, but haven't tried to "measure" myself. Gonna try though, but I'm not sure I will know which "E" for example, on the tuner it just says A, A#, E etc. I have excellent hearing in a musical sense, but I'm not sure I trust myself so much that I can know for sure I'm singing exactly the same note as when I play around on the guitar...
#9
Quote by Cryptorchild
If you have a mac's garage band it can tell you


What's a mac's garage band? haha
#12
Okay, I got the tone between A on the 6th string (3rd fret) to D on the 1st string (11th fret). How do I say that? That my vocal range is 2,5 octaves? The low A I hit is that called A2?
#13
Quote by prettynoose
Okay, I got the tone between A on the 6th string (3rd fret) to D on the 1st string (11th fret). How do I say that? That my vocal range is 2,5 octaves? The low A I hit is that called A2?


I don't know what tuning you're using.

Usually that would be a G and a D#, but yeah, roughly 3 and a half octaves.
rawr
Last edited by I Am Jack! at Aug 18, 2008,
#14
Oh, it appears that 1st string 10th fret is C2 which should mean I have a vocal range of 3,5 octaves, right? Correct me if I'm wrong
#15
Umm, probably hold a guitar tuner up to your mouth and sing, then play the note on a piano.
http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/westaussie/

Quote by StratPat

Quote by blacksabbath8
So I had to take a massive dump, and I went in the bassment. So it's been down there for a while and the stench is terrible and i think it's seeping into the floor.

#16
I have some significant doubts that you have a 3.5 octave range. Are you including your falsetto in this?
#17
Quote by gibsonpenguin
I have some significant doubts that you have a 3.5 octave range. Are you including your falsetto in this?



Well, how many octaves is A2 to C^2? 6th string 3rd fret to 1st string 10th fret. And yes, falsetto is included.
#18
Tune your guitar if you're going to be using string/frets instead of note names.

lowest to highest: EADGBe

Third fret on lowest string should be a G, 10th fret on highest string should be a D
rawr
#19
Quote by I Am Jack!
Tune your guitar if you're going to be using string/frets instead of note names.

lowest to highest: EADGBe

Third fret on lowest string should be a G, 10th fret on highest string should be a D


It was tuned when I estimated my range. But thanks anyway
#20
Falsetto i dont think counts in your usual range.

Also, match pitch on your guitar from lowest note you can to highest, record results, and ask The guys in the Vocals thread in musicians talk. They can help a lot
#21
Quote by prettynoose
Well, how many octaves is A2 to C^2? 6th string 3rd fret to 1st string 10th fret. And yes, falsetto is included.
Generally speaking, you don't include your falsetto when talking about your range.
#22
Quote by grampastumpy
Generally speaking, you don't include your falsetto when talking about your range.


Ok, stupid question: How do I know when it's really falsetto and not just a high note with normal chest voice?