#1
hey dudes i need some help with buying a new computer. im not very knowledgeable with this kinda thing. Im looking for a ALL IN ONE computer. Gaming, videos, music recording. Very fast with Amazing graphics and sound. any help would be sweet. ............Are alienwares any good?
#4
Higherend Alienwares or Dells should be alright if you want to go with that.
Or take a look at some of these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883229036 (It's fancy looking!)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883107173
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/computer_can_series.do?storeName=computer_store&category=desktops&a1=Category&v1=All-in-One+PCs&series_name=IQ506t_series

I'm not going to suggest getting a mac...I'll leave that up to the rest of the pit.


P.S.
I don't recommend an Acer computer, I've been fighting with them for weeks and their customer service are all poor excuses for human beings
...just a side note.
#5
alienware is overpriced as hell


build it yourself
if you have enough dexterity to use a screwdrive you can do it
#8
Quote by seljer
alienware is overpriced as hell


build it yourself
if you have enough dexterity to use a screwdrive you can do it


Definitely overpriced. For an Alienware computer my friend was looking at, you paid £1,600. I could put together something better, paying full retail price and VAT, for £1,000.

I completely agree with you here. Self-building is pretty easy and, when it comes to high-end computing, by far the best value-for-money.
#10
I always hear americans raving about some place called newegg.com or osming
#11
Although I myself use macs, I dont suggest it for you.

Build one yourself. You can build a tricked out computer for alot cheaper than buying one with all the same components.
:stickpoke

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#12
Research.

You need to decide on a number of things. When it comes to processors, do you want to go AMD or Intel? Single-core, dual-core or quad-core? And then when it comes to graphics cards, do you want to go ATi or nVidia?

Currently, Intel and ATi seem to hold the upper-hand in their respective markets.

You also need to decide just how much performance you want from your computer. What operating system do you plan on running? Which games and programs do you want to use and how well do you want them to perform?

If you'd like, I can help you put a spec together.

Quote by JackalUK
I always hear americans raving about some place called newegg.com or osming


Supposed to be one of the cheapest places to buy components.

Edit: This is just a sample, but I think this is probably the most you'd need to spend (unless you wanted two graphics cards, or some extra storage space).

Intel Core 2 Quad 9650 3.0GHz CPU
ASUS P5Q Deluxe P45 Motherboard
OCZ Reaper DDR2 1066MHz RAM
Sapphire Technologies HD 4870 Graphics Card (I have this card, it's probably the best in its price range)
Seagate Barracuda ST3500320NS 500GB Hard Drive
Samsung SH-S223F 22x SATA DVD-RW
Zalman ZH-600P 600w Modular Power Supply
Antec 900 Gaming Case
Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate 32-bit OEM

Total: $1712.91

That puts you just short of $800 under your maximum budget and would serve you better than any AlienWare machine.
Last edited by Denthúl at Aug 18, 2008,
#13
First of all, don't buy a computer from a company like ACER, Packard Bell, Dell, Fujitsu Sienmens or whatever. They're just totally crap for their price, plus you will most certainly not get exactly what you want. Build it yourself.

I don't know what everything is called in english and I don't know any good sites or prices in USA so I'll just give you some tips on what to look for.

Get a Intel Pentium Dual Core E8400 or 8500 as a processor if you're into both gaming, music and that stuff. In games you won't make any use of a Quad-core in the next up coming years so an E8400 will be perfect. They came it in the beginning of this year and are really good at overcloking as well.

For the motherboard, look into the Gigabyte series. Personally I use a Gigabyte GA-P35-DS4 and it's good for just about everything. Perfect for overclocking too. You could also get another one from Gigabyte, either cheaper or more expensive. But just make sure you don't get a motherboard with loads of stuff you'll never even use. Like 1 terabyte network or something.

Chassis are what you like and prefer. I use an Antec P182 and it's really easy to install cables and very quite. I also added 2 more fans to the already 3 in it so it doesn't get hot in there Other chassis you could look up are Midtowers, Fulltowers or maybe an Antec Ninehundred (personally it's to flashy for me). Just make sure you don't get a small chassi, since it will make it really hard putting everything together.

Graphic cards are also quite hard to decide. Some like Nvidia and some like ATI. I prefer Nvidia at the moment, and I'm using a Geeforce 8800 GTX, which is really good but you should probably look at either the Geeforce 8800 GTS series or the new Geeforce 9600. Both are quite cheap and really good performance. The memory in you graphic card will do fine with 512. But if you're planning on using a big screen, 22" or more, you might want to consider either 712 MB or 1 gig.

As power supply I don't really have any good suggestions but I've always like the Corsair. Always worked good for me and you shouldn't need more than like 520W. Could get more if you want to but it shouldn't be necessary.

You will need a DVD reader/burner. There are almost only 2 options, NEC or Samsung. Doen't really matter what you get as long as it fulfills your requirements.

As for RAM memory. You will want 4 gig and a few popular are Corsair TwinX series, Kingston, OCZ. You can't really go wrong with of them but make sure they're running in at least 1066 Mhz or preferably higher.

You will also want Windows Vista x64 since the 32 bit version will only be able to use like 3 gig of your RAM memory.

Harddrive you could just pick basically anything as long as it is at least 7200rpm and as big as you want. You could get a 10000rpm for the installation files and games if you want but it's not necessary.

A soundcard will also be necessary since you want to record music etc. I'm not really into sound cards so I can't tell what's good and what's bad. Just make sure if you wan't to get the best possible recording souncard to not buy like a "Soundblaster Gaming edition" or something. Not that their bad. Just that there are better for your purpose.

You might want something extra stuff to maek sure it doesn't get hot inside your chassi. (This is only if you're planning on overclocking). Get some extra fans and replace the cooling the device on your processor with something like Thermalright Ultra-120 Extreme (best out there) if you'll buy the E8400 processor.

Stuff I might add is. You'll need cooling paste when building the computer so buy some "Artic Silver 5" (best cooling paste) at the same time you buy your equipment. Make sure you buy every component with SATA cables and not LED. I don't think there are many things that are LED in these days but you never know. It'll be som much easier if you only have SATA cables and no LED cables. The biggest chance on buying a LED component is on the CD and DVD reader/burner.

Im sure I have forgotten something but I hope that helped you a clear out some questions anyhow.
Last edited by xaedon at Aug 18, 2008,
#14
Quote by xaedon
You will also want Windows Vista x64 since the 32 bit version will only be able to use like 3 gig of your RAM memory.


Not true, that only applies to Windows XP. The 32-bit version (which I'm running) only recognisses 3.25 of my 4GB, but the 64-bit version recognises 4GB. Vista, however, recognises 4GB in either.
#15
Quote by Denthúl
Not true, that only applies to Windows XP. The 32-bit version (which I'm running) only recognisses 3.25 of my 4GB, but the 64-bit version recognises 4GB. Vista, however, recognises 4GB in either.


have they fixed it recently?
#16
Quote by bons330
alright if i would build a computer myself where would i start

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mainly, you need to buy:
  • a case. I personally don't get too hung up on looks, get whatever you want.
  • a power supply for the case if it doesn't come with one.... recommended anyway because you want to buy something good, not a cheapo thing that doesn't give you enough power and causes stability issues/dies on you
  • a CPU, intel are good at the moment. Some kind of Core 2 Duo thing would be what you want (maybe Quad...I honestly don't care anymore since they're all fast enough for me today). Comes together with a heatsink which works fine.
  • motherboard. This is basically the foundation of everything there. Get one that can accept whatever CPU you get (I think intel is on socket 478 now?) and supports any other features you may want. They more or less all have USB and Firewire on them, as well as onboard network and sound cards (which works fine for everyday use. You may want to get a dedicated audio interface if you're going to be recording)
  • RAM. DDR2 is what you want now. 4 gigs is a good amount to get (maybe more if you're going for fancy video and audio stuff but I'm currently doing fine on just 2 myself). Don't be afraid to spend a bit more and the faster high quality stuff.
  • video card.... I donno...spend a couple of hundred on whatever nvidia has out atm and be done with it
  • 500gig harddrives are cheap....go for more....put 2 of them in there an set up a RAID array if you want things to be fast (or again, more). Since you mentioned video and audio you might want to get a ton just for storage (or an external one or....)
  • get your basic DVDRW drive. bluray and that isn't cheap enough to be worth it yet


and since you mentioned you have $2500 that should leave plenty to get some kind of nice Protools compatible audio interface for recording

Quote by xaedon
have they fixed it recently?


doubt it, its one of the inherent problems of 32 bit systems in general

each 'box' of memory has an address assigned to it, and when using 32 bits to remember address you run out of addresses for all your boxes
#17
Quote by Denthúl
Not true, that only applies to Windows XP. The 32-bit version (which I'm running) only recognisses 3.25 of my 4GB, but the 64-bit version recognises 4GB. Vista, however, recognises 4GB in either.

No, he is correct. Vista Service Pack 1 should now display the correct amount of RAM but that isn't the same thing as what it can use.
#18
For recording work its best to go with a desktop....heck, in general desktops are best because you can easily upgrade them each year.

go for at least a 2.20GH Intel Dual core processor, 7200RPM drives and loads of space on them for those WAV files you record to, a good extra video card, and about 3GB of fast RAM. Add a nice recording interface and you have yourself a great machine.

Build it, you get a better deal that way IMO
Dells are something to stay away from if you ask me...


BTW I run Acer laptops and desktops and love them...they need some work off the shelf but they are nice machines. my only complaint is the desktop I have (T180) has the old 939 processor socket...
The laptop (5570Z) is very nice...

I remember learning about building PCs a while back,,,,I had no idea what to even look for. These days I read up on everything and know what parts work with what.
Basically you pick a Motherboard, they come in AMD and Intel as the two brands of processors you will install on this board are not interchangable.
Plug some RAM (memory), Power cables, Cards, and a processor into the MB and you basically have your computer.
If you plan on recording get a quiet case, I like the Antec P182 for around $150, its heavy but extremely quiet and keeps very cool.
Always get a better power supply and swap the one in the case if it comes with one...they tend to be crap. For games and audio work you will probably run loads of HDs and good video card so you'll want a 700W supply or more, dont skimp out on this part, its important and feeds everything...dont want it failing and causing damage...
Last edited by moody07747 at Aug 18, 2008,
#19
Well a Mac would be nice, and if you go to the apple store you can buy games made for the mac. You can also download torrents.
#20
Quote by MrP
No, he is correct. Vista Service Pack 1 should now display the correct amount of RAM but that isn't the same thing as what it can use.


Aha, my bad. Having just looked at the disc, it's the x64 version.

Good job I looked, actually, 'cause I was just about to disagree majorly with you, since I didn't have SP1 installed.