#1
Hi, I'm new to this site and to the guitar. With the amount of on-line instruction there is, at 43 years old, i thought i would teach myself the basics.
Been at it 4 days now and just wanted to know if i am going in the right direction.

I am going to great lengths to practice the proper posture and hand/finger positioning.

My daily routine so far is two sessions/day, each session is 20 minutes practicing 4 scales. the major, blues, minor and major pentatonic and 20 minutes is spent on Chord progression exercises. I have learned 10 chords, but can't play them all cleanly yet, with the A, D & Dm giving me the most problems.

I guess that i will need to develop callouses and build strength in my fingers to allow me to be clean in all my chords because my hand position is pretty good.

Thanks all. Any input would be greatly appreciated!

Btw- just purchased a new yamaha FG730s to learn on and I LOVE IT.
Last edited by Dr Robert at Aug 18, 2008,
#2
That sounds perfectly fine to me.
Current Equipment:
Acoustic: Cort SFX6R.
Electric Guitars: Fender American Standard Strat, Epiphone Les Paul.
Effects Pedals: Crybaby Wah, Boss OD-3.

In the Pipe-line...
Fender Blues Jnr.
Tube Screamer TS-808.
Boss BD-2.

#3
a tip for when you try barre chords put your finger in the position of the chord take away the finger barring the frets then practice the normal choed like that
#4
These are very, very good lessons:

http://guitar.about.com/library/blguitarlessonarchive.htm

It shows you how to hold the pick, how to re-string, everything. I did everything from the first lesson, stuck with it, and spent a week on each new lesson... heck, I still haven't completed all of them. The good things are the scales - you'll understand what they're for in time, but in those lessons they really build your fingers up to be strong. I'd spend a lot of time on them.

Number one rule when learning guitar: never give up. It will get better.

Good luck
#5
You need to get a metronome and use it a lot. You want to have good rhythm. There is nothing worse than an out of time guitarist.


Andddddddd, you might want to focus on chords more than scales for the moment, because whilst scales are great for improv, you're not gonna be doing any anytime soon and whilst they build up finger dexterity and independence, it will pay off a lot more if your fingers are strong from chord practice.


Learn a few easy songs, with just 4 or 5 chords. Sing along if you have a good voice(I don't!). Make sure you're in time. Start practising VERY slowly and build up speed gradually.

If you're not sure how to use a metronome post back and I'll explain.


#6
Quote by confusius
Learn a few easy songs, with just 4 or 5 chords.
I totally agree with this. Check out these online video lessons from Desi Serna for ideas. My brother teaches piano lessons, and he asks new students what song they'd like to learn to play, and fashions his lessons with this goal in mind.

I think learning guitar can be done very technically (scales, metronomes, specific exercises) or very organically (grab a few tabs online or in books, and start playing songs). By this I mean even though guitar playing is mostly a right side-of-the-brain endeavor, there's value with getting technical.

Good luck!
#7
Thank you all for the great suggestions!

These are very, very good lessons:
Thanks man, that was one of the first site's i took notice of.

Number one rule when learning guitar: never give up. It will get better.
That is what everybody says, and truthfully one of the hardest things to believe
But i am dedicating an hour/day minimum and i do see progress, slowly but surely.

a tip for when you try barre chords put your finger in the position of the chord take away the finger barring the frets then practice the normal chord like that
Thats sounds like a great tip, and its been stored upstairs for when i get to barre's- thnx

You need to get a metronome and use it a lot. You want to have good rhythm. There is nothing worse than an out of time guitarist.
Thank you confusius, going back for that tomorrow, I'm sure that will be a big help.

there's value with getting technical.
Thanks Rick, this is exactly the way i want to learn
Last edited by Dr Robert at Aug 18, 2008,
#9
You can find an online metronome with google if you don't want to shell out the cash on a real one.




Thinking about getting this one tomorrow, cost about $35. But thanks for offering the freebie
#10
i recomend doing the 1-2-3-4 excerise to build your finger strength too.

this excersise is to pick notes 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 on low E. and go down, and then back up.

then when you start to really wanna work on your pinky finger stretching and strength you can do something like 1-2-3-5....

with this excersise you can go anywhere on the fretboard using the consectutive 1-2-3-4 notes.... so if to start to be a little easier you could go 5-6-7-8 or something(since there a little closer)

and when your doing this, try your best to alternate pick, that will seem very awkward at first, but if you learn it early it will pay off in the long run.

the person that mentioned barre chords is very right also...they can be very tricky for some people, i myself found them to be pretty easy(since when i started i was all in the punk music) but someone like my brother, when he went to try and learn to do barre chords he strugled and strugled, and as far as i know is still struggling.


a couple of songs you could learn are:

straight open chords:
rollin on the river--CCR
good riddance-greenday(dont worry bout the intro, unless you really wanna learn it)
wonderwall-oasis (if you have a capo)
wish you were here-pink floyd (you dont even have to worry bout the intro, or the solos, but there not to hard, if you want somethin to work on)

barre chords/power chord:
outside-staind
kryptonite-3 doors down(actually has a barre chord, and open chords)

i can name some more later if you want, but these should hold you over for a while
#13
Just remember your doing it for fun! Don't be afraid to go beyond your set routine and mess around from time to time. The more fun you have, the better you'll get.
#15
Yes and thank you all for the great advice. I tend to stay away from songs for now and focus on my chord progression exercises at least until i am able to speed up my chord changes, and play them all cleanly.

Still having a bit of a problem with A-D & Dm, buts its only been 9 days and my fingers are big

For fun at the end of my sessions, i use the six scales that i practice to improv some weird acid jazz riffs.

Got a metronome today, excited about being able to learn tempo and chart my progress all in one shot.
Thanks again, good to know you can get sound professional advice here. Great website!