#1
Hi bass forum. Is there anyone out there who plays alot of blues on bass and boogie aswell? I really want to explore this style.I don't know a whole lot about theory but how can I "sound" blues-ier and possibly improvise in a blues style? I'm mostly thinking about slow to mid paced stuff thats not to busy ot technical but has occasional interesting fills and licks.

I'm listening to stuff like this and want to get a simular style. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hr-fv-vsHU
Last edited by Randy Bobandy at Aug 18, 2008,
#2
Sounds like you want to use the blues scale.
Uhhh...I'm not sure how to show you the fingering.

On the E string it's 1-4
then on the A it's 1-2-3
then on the D it's 1-3

Then just move that pattern around the fretboard.
I also find that the minor pentatonic works well for this kind of stuff.

Edit: Sunshine of your love - Cream is basically the blues scale in D just straight down. It's great for practice. Also the common I-IV-V progression that you'll find in blues is good to improvise in/over and while it's usually in mixolydian it still sounds good in the blues scale.
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Last edited by Victory2134 at Aug 18, 2008,
#3
I'm in a blues band right now, so I'd be happy to answer any specific question you might have.

As a blues bass player, your role in the band is not to shine per se, but to provide the heart beat foundation / stage for everyone else, esp. the solo instrument to fly.

My recommendations for great blues bassist to listen are:

Tommy Shannon (Stevie Ray Vaughn). Just listen to what he does in a song like "Pride and Joy" and you'll see how much you can hold down the fort, and yet be incredibly creative.

Willie Dixon.
Wrote and played on a tonne of blues classics

Jerry Jermott
(BB King). Another player who could hold down a great blues groove behind one of the greatest blues guitarists.

Also check out Roscoe Beck who I've heard play with Robben Ford. Has some nice videos and books out there as well.

For books, check out Hal Leonard Bass Method - Blues Bass. It will take you through the basic techniques of Blues playing on bass and has the standard notation and tab for every friggin' blues standard known to man along with a play along CD.
#4
Quote by anarkee
I'm in a blues band right now, so I'd be happy to answer any specific question you might have.

As a blues bass player, your role in the band is not to shine per se, but to provide the heart beat foundation / stage for everyone else, esp. the solo instrument to fly.

My recommendations for great blues bassist to listen are:

Tommy Shannon (Stevie Ray Vaughn). Just listen to what he does in a song like "Pride and Joy" and you'll see how much you can hold down the fort, and yet be incredibly creative.

Willie Dixon.
Wrote and played on a tonne of blues classics

Jerry Jermott
(BB King). Another player who could hold down a great blues groove behind one of the greatest blues guitarists.

Also check out Roscoe Beck who I've heard play with Robben Ford. Has some nice videos and books out there as well.

For books, check out Hal Leonard Bass Method - Blues Bass. It will take you through the basic techniques of Blues playing on bass and has the standard notation and tab for every friggin' blues standard known to man along with a play along CD.



Anarkee, so does the bassist in a blues band play and think musically more in to what the drummer is doing rather then the guitarist? They seem to just keep a slow rythmic beat with the drums while the guitarist plays leads most of the time as opposed to just improvising off of the guitar player's chords like in regular rock bands. The bass player from Rory Galleheger did that ( I forget his name).

Thanks Anarkee.
#5
My husband (a drummer) said it best. In blues, the drums lock with the bass player as apposed the the bass player locking with the drums. You really become the pulse and driving beat for the song more so than the drummer themselves.

Most bass players can manage a blues bass line melodically. They aren't that complicated per se, but getting the feel and being "in the pocket" becomes very vital. Let me give you an example. Last night I was playing "Stormy Monday" (Allman brothers) which is a great tune to check out btw. The song is a slow blues but has a wonderful loping push pull feel to it. Guess who sets that feel? The bass player. If you try to play that straight on, you loose the feel of the song.

If you can't jam with other players, my advice is to get some blues tunes and start woodshedding to recordings. Getting that feel and knowing when to add a discrete fill or run is going to come only with practice and time.
#6
To be honest, what Anarkee said here is probably what attracts me most about the blues. I like my creative control (maybe a little too much), and with a few little note changes and a faster tempo, what I do as the bass player turns the song into a completely different animal. not even the drummer can override that. of course, this means you need to practice your sense of time a lot more often.
get a metrenome...and good luck!
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