#1
So I need a neck reset. But, thing is, the music shop said it would be well over £220.

As a 14 year old with no job, and thus no income, this is simply not an option. And I can't do it myself as I don't know the first thing about lutherie, and I'd be too scared anyway as the instrument in question was built around 1935. Not only this, the sentimental value is through the roof.

So, I was wondering if there are any alternatives. What would happen if I took off the strings, hung a weight off the headstock, secured the body and left it in my attic for... say... a year?

Would that work? If not... please help!
#2
you could try calling a different music shop instead of just one
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#3
That's the only one I can go to - plus it wouldn't make any difference... the prices would always be more than I could afford.

Unless you know of someone who would do a neck reset for... £60?
#4
Your Harmony Vogue is well worth the money to have it restored professionally, so please not try to do anything yourself, in particular not the brutal action you suggested.
I would suggest to take ample time for it. Put the old Harmony in secure storage a while. Eventually you'll have the money and the connections to have the job done properly by someone you can trust to it. It doesn't matter if it takes a few years.
In the meantime you can play a cheap Chinese that you buy for to get through this period.
#5
Quote by Marcel Veltman
Your Harmony Vogue is well worth the money to have it restored professionally, so please not try to do anything yourself, in particular not the brutal action you suggested.
I would suggest to take ample time for it. Put the old Harmony in secure storage a while. Eventually you'll have the money and the connections to have the job done properly by someone you can trust to it. It doesn't matter if it takes a few years.
In the meantime you can play a cheap Chinese that you buy for to get through this period.


That's a good idea. I might just do that.

But you say its worth the money... are Harmony Vogues very rare/sought-after?

#6
Quote by EJD
That's a good idea. I might just do that.

But you say its worth the money... are Harmony Vogues very rare/sought-after?



Not as rare as other guitars of that era. Harmony used to be the Sonjjing of it's day, producing affordable instruments on a huge industrial scale.
Sought after is not the word either, but if you'd offer your Vogue for sale, it would certainly draw attention.
What it's value is expressed in money is hard to tell. There is a tough bunch of hard core Harmony fanatics around, but they're all poor sods like you. It's certainly worth a lot more than the costs of a thorough overhaul, but not by far as much as a Martin or Gibson of that era. For you this has the advantage that you can actually afford to keep it. If it were a Martin, you would almost certainly be forced to sell it.

Point is that any guitar of such vintage in good working order is unique and cherishable and should be kept with great care. Ownership makes you the keeper of a priceless piece of the worlds cultural heritage. Not that this means you have to lock it up in a closet forever, never to let anyone touch it. Far from that! It should be played, and played well, preferably in front of an audience.

Look here:.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7knB3VtAqY
It's David Rawlings on his 1936 Epiphone Olympia giving you inspiration.

Good luck
#7
Thanks - and I will play it well. I have it tuned one step down to reduce pressure on the neck, but I still blast some Tenacious D every now and then

Here is a thread on it, with pics:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=858596&highlight=identification

But you say if it were a Martin/Gibson from the same era I'd be forced to sell it as I couldn't afford to "run" it... why? The only costs I see would be strings and/or polishes.
#8
I ow you an apology. I've been talking crap. Googling around the www in search for some numbers to support my statement, I made a surprising and for myself rather embarrassing discovery. The outragious prices everybody is talking about are paid for some vintage guitars, but certainly not for all. Most 1930's acoustics cost surprisingly little. An average Gibson can be had for $2000,- to $4000,- , while a department store cheapy like yours will do a few hundred at most.
Substantially more expensive are some guitars that were already exquisite in their days, like a 1930's Gibson Super 400, that may change hands for a stiff $35000,- or hyped up classics like a '59 LP Gold Top or a '52 Tele, that can even be trice as expensive as that. That is what I had in mind when I said that a guitar can be too valuable for someone to keep it. You can easily imagine that it's not reasonable to maintain a $100.000,- guitar while you are struggling to make a living.

But as said, this situation doesn't apply when it comes to 1930's flat tops. For all economic purposes your Harmony has had it. Sorry for that.
That aside I stick to my previous repons in which I said that you should have it repaired properly in due time. Sod economics. Guitars don't usually get 70 years old. Something very special is going on here. Don't break the magic charm.
#9
$35,000? For a guitar? Holy crap

And I thought a new Gibson SG was expensive at around $850

Thanks for your help, man. I will maintain it and get it fixed properly, when I get a job and some income.