#1
Hi. I have a pretty organised practice routine - most of which is done with a metronome. But on some exercises which I have progressed to certain speeds, I have found them quite comfortable yet at other times I am finding it difficult to keep up.

As you can understand this is quite frustrating when you feel you've took another step forward then find sometimes you can't do the same thing when you try it again.

Should I keep at the same speeds when this happens, or turn the metronome down a notch until it becomes comfortable again, then progress back up?

Appreciate ANY thoughts at all on this and ideas on other practice methods.

Cheers.
#2
um, that used to happen to me often but not so much anymore, cause i practice more often now. I used to practice long hours and then I wouldnt play at all for like a week so what i progressed those long hours got lost during the week. Maybe you are not playing as often as you should or you are not warming up properly (that used to happen to me too).
#3
I have noticed this to happen and to be honest I have narrowed it down to two things:

1) Waivering concentration

2) Feeling tired.

If your concentration is waivering, take a short 5 minute break. Have tea or some water and come back to it. If your feeling tired... Same solution. It is ideal to drop back 5 - 10 bpm and bring yourself back up to the speed you were on. Stay at that speed until you can play it perfectly with no mistakes and cleanly before you move up. The next practice session, start on that speed and slowly move up. Then move down in bpm and then back up.

Regularly I start at 100 bpm, go to about 170 where I start to waiver, drop back to 160, 120, then all the way to 60 then go up by 10 each time till I reach target. I stay focused the whole time. Once my concentration starts to waiver. I stop. Rest. Then go back to it. Usually I practice for 45 mins every hour and have a 15 min break.

Hope this helps.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#4
^ i don't think it's any of that. at all. that happened to me before too. yeah it gets really frustrating, but you don't want to force playing quicker, when you actually can't. just go down on a little speed and wait till you can do the same again. if you don't, you will not improve, but have a regression instead. and i'm sure that's not what you'd want. so just take it easy, and play accurately.
#5
this may be kinda inappropriate but..... the solution to all my timing and speed problems is marijuana. If you smoke then practice practice practice so you don't forget it. It just kinda sticks... idk give it a try if your into that kinda ****


-don kappyton
#6
Every time you pick up the guitar, you're facing a new day. Forget about yesterday
and where you THINK you should be. You haven't gone "backwards". Your
cycle of ups & downs has probably gotten higher over time. Accept the down
cycles along with the ups.

Practice for consistency. That too, is a skill. It helps to have a ritual every time
you pick up the guitar. I don't mean warm-ups. I mean a set of things you do
everytime you pick the guitar up to help you "reconnect" with your instrument.
Wind players might call it playing "long notes". Relax and reconnect.
#7
Thanks for all the advice - It is VERY much appreciated. Weed ain't my thing but to the other 3 replies I'm grateful. Makes sense what you guys are saying, especially about the long gaps between practices. I'm gonna work all these suggestions into my routines and look forward to seeing great results.

Thanks a lot guys, this really was a great help.
#8
Every time you pick up the guitar, you're facing a new day. Forget about yesterday
and where you THINK you should be. You haven't gone "backwards". Your
cycle of ups & downs has probably gotten higher over time. Accept the down
cycles along with the ups.

Practice for consistency. That too, is a skill. It helps to have a ritual every time
you pick up the guitar. I don't mean warm-ups. I mean a set of things you do
everytime you pick the guitar up to help you "reconnect" with your instrument.
Wind players might call it playing "long notes". Relax and reconnect.


Great advice. This makes so much sense, especially abt consistency - always hung up on like you said "Thinking where I should be". Fantastic help. Thank you.
#9
Quote by don kappyton
this may be kinda inappropriate but..... the solution to all my timing and speed problems is marijuana. If you smoke then practice practice practice so you don't forget it. It just kinda sticks... idk give it a try if your into that kinda ****


-don kappyton




get this out of here.


Listen to edg - building consistency is key.

When you're playing something, really try to focus in on what it is you're doing, how you're moving your muscles, however minute the movements may be. What you're trying to achieve is not just playing it perfectly, but playing it perfectly several times in a row, in effect "programming" it into your hands (muscle memory) to get it right. It might be that you are putting in the reps, but there are subtle differences each time you do it, which makes your fingers confused when crunch time comes because they've done it a couple different ways (the cycles of ups and downs mentioned above - and we only want the ups!) And, if you've really been drilling on it a lot, take a break for a day so that your fingers can "take it in" and try starting on it fresh later.
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
Last edited by thefoldarsoldar at Aug 18, 2008,
#10
Try going up a certain amount, then back to a tempo between the previous speed and your current tempo. Repeat it until you reach the speed you want.