#1
I recently changed my classical guitar strings. when i changed them i swaped the normal tensions originally on the guitar to super hard tension strings. i gave the guitar a while for the strings to stretch played it for about two weeks and then i began to notice that the volume of the guitar seemed to be alot lower than when i had the normal tension strings my question is do higher tension strings give more or less volume
#3
I play a steel string and in my experience it makes a huge difference in volume and articulation. But with my guitar the thicker the strings the louder it gets. I dont know why it would be opposite for a nylon guitar but from my understanding of how it works the higher the tension (from thicker strings or higher piched tuning) the stronger the effect of the string vibration on the saddle and top of the guitar (which is responsible for amplifying the string vibrations) and the higher the volume and to a degree clarity. Maybe when you pick with your fingers its harder to dig in with the non fretting hand?
#4
Quote by red18420
Higher tension means less vibrations. You can guess the rest.

lower tension enhances lower frequencies but cuts higher frequencies. with lower tension you feel more vibration because the lower and more "feelable" frequencies are emphasized.
#5
Quote by red18420
Higher tension means less vibrations. You can guess the rest.


Your english is bad, but your physics is worse. If your playing the same note, the strings are vibrating at the same frequency, regardless of tension.

Higher tension strings have more mass swinging back and forth when you pluck. They are generally louder, but depending on fingerstrength, playing style, and type of guitar, they might have the effect of sounding quiet.

What I suspect you're hearing is the decreased "pop" of the guitar. Ligher strings give a snappy sound and big, heavy, high tension strings will improve low-end volume. You're likely noticing the decrease in high undertones which seems like lack of volume.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Aug 21, 2008,