#1
I really want to start learning some basic jazz pieces.

The only one i have really learnt is 'All the things you are', but i didn't really learn that one totally.

The problem i seem to have is whenever i look into things like Fake Books i get sooo confused within a few bars.
Some of the chords asked for (eg E11+(b9) etc) i just don't know! Ok, i could easily work out a voicing, but generally speaking it gets too complicated.

What i want is some beginner level chord sheets (ideally with tab) that show basic jazz pieces with bar by bar chord changes. (another problem is when they ask for 3-4 chord within a bar etc)

This is how i play 'All the things...'

Code:
|: Db7#9 | % | C7#9 | % :|

|: F-7 | Bb-7 | Eb7 | Abmaj7 |
| Dbmaj7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | % |
| C-7 | F-7 | Bb7 | Ebmaj7 |
| Abmaj7 | D7 | Gmaj7 | E7 |
| A-7 | D7 | Gmaj7 | % |
| F#m7b5 | B7 | Emaj7 | % |
| F-7 | Bb-7 | Eb7 | Abmaj7 |
| Dbmaj7 | Db-7 | C-7 | Bdim7 |
| Bb-7 | Eb7 | Abmaj7 | Abmaj7:|This is a form i can work with!!! only a few complicated chords and only 1 chord per bar.

If anybody can recommend (or even supply) some other cool sounding jazz pieces i would be grateful.
#2
anything based on a blues?
over this summer i learned all blues (miles davis) ok, pretty easy; just three chords (so you should try to revoice them a bunch of different ways. Over the G7 chord you can use G mixolydian and, if i understood my teacher correctly use the altered scale over D7 and Eb7. Arpeggios also work, and if you get lost in the changes (happens to me a good bit, esp. when im reading off of the lead sheet) the G blues scale is applicable.
#3
Take the A-train, All of Me, All Blues, Freddie Freeloader, Blue Monk, Under My Skin. Those should be enough to get you started.
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#4
if you want to learn jazz with tabs , you are so wrong. it's not a matter of 'knowing' the chords, it a matter of figuring out what the most important notes of that chord are, and find a comfort way to play them. there might be more than hundred ways to play a chord. that's what jazz is all about!
#5
Quote by Weepin_Guitar
if you want to learn jazz with tabs , you are so wrong. it's not a matter of 'knowing' the chords, it a matter of figuring out what the most important notes of that chord are, and find a comfort way to play them. there might be more than hundred ways to play a chord. that's what jazz is all about!

Strange statement.... you can't know anything without learning.
Learning voicings for common jazz chords is exactly what i am trying to acheive.... so what i am after is some very simplified jazz standards to get me started.

Once i am good with simple chord sheets... i can tackle the more complicated stuff.

The reason i ask for tab is so i get an idea of different peoples preferred voicings.
#6
by the way, 9ths, 11ths, and 13ths and their flats and sharps are just extentions of the chord, on E11b9 you can aswell play E7, but the E11b9 will sound more musical. I would play G9 on a E11b9, because all the notes are the same , and the bass is playing the E.
#7
Some jazz standards by Barney Kessel perhaps. That's just one name I can think of off the top my head. Wes Montgomery as well.
#8
Ok, i will start with 'All of Me' because..... well, because it begins with 'A'

Here are the changes-

I6/9		I6/9		viim7		III9        
iiim7		VI9	VI7	iim7   VI7	iim7     
viim7		III9		vim7   III7#5#9	vim7        
vim7 		II7   II7	iim7        	V13        
IMaj7        	IMaj7        	viim7        	III9        
iiim7       	VI9   VI7   	 iim7   VI7    	iim7        
IV6        	bvdim        	IMaj7   IVMaj7  iiim7   VI9    
II9        	iim7   V13    	I6   VI7    	iim7   V13    
I6/9   


This is in C, but is it C major or C minor? I am finding it difficult to tell.


EDIT - i think i get it now, if it was C minor i would see the flattened numeral.
Last edited by branny1982 at Aug 19, 2008,
#9
Quote by branny1982
Ok, i will start with 'All of Me' because..... well, because it begins with 'A'

Here are the changes-

I6/9 I6/9 viim7 III9
iiim7 VI9 VI7 iim7 VI7 iim7
viim7 III9 vim7 III7#5#9 vim7
vim7 II7 II7 iim7 V13
IMaj7 IMaj7 viim7 III9
iiim7 VI9 VI7 iim7 VI7 iim7
IV6 bvdim IMaj7 IVMaj7 iiim7 VI9
II9 iim7 V13 I6 VI7 iim7 V13
I6/9


This is in C, but is it C major or C minor? I am finding it difficult to tell.


EDIT - i think i get it now, if it was C minor i would see the flattened numeral.


yeah its C Major

Im going to post some things that should help you at DGO a little later.
shred is gaudy music
#10
^thanks Dan.

For anybody who may be interested.... 'All of Me' in C -


¦C6/9	¦C6/9	¦Bm7	¦E9	¦

¦Em7	¦A9 A7	¦Dm7 A7	¦Dm7	¦

¦Am7	¦D7	¦Dm7	¦G13	¦

¦CΔ	¦CΔ	¦Bm7	¦E9	¦

¦Em7	¦A9 A7	¦Dm7 A7	¦Dm7	¦

¦F6	¦Gbdim	¦CΔ FΔ	¦Em7 A9	¦

¦D9	¦Dm7 G13¦C6 A7	¦Dm7 G13¦

¦C6/9	¦
#11
Quote by Weepin_Guitar
I would play G9 on a E11b9, because all the notes are the same , and the bass is playing the E.


I think G9 would work for Em11b9, but not E11b9.

The original poster had a chord with a "+" in it, E11+(b9) I think. Would that mean you just sharp the 5th on the E11b9 chord or is that something different?
#13
You might want to try Wolf Marshall's Wes Montgomery book. He wrote lots of
standards, plus you get the advantage of it tabbed out with the note-for-note
voicings. A lot of it is the solos, but Wes did lots of block chord soloing and some
of the comps are tabbed too. Very instructive. TRhe sound deceptively easy but
they're a challenge.
#14
some tips on doing standards from "head sheets" (fake book)

many of the progressions can be simplified by using just basic chords .. just to get the feel of the song..example

C Maj7 emi7b5 ami11 D7b5 G7#5..Cma7...convert to just the basic chord CMaj7 .. Emi7..Ami7..D7..G7...

The use of altered chords may be to support the melody line..if the basic chord does not convey the harmonic intent "feel" of the song then the altered note(s) is required ..but you will know the basic progression..altering the chord may be as easy as minimal finger movement..

practice "vamping" to get used to more than one chord per bar...there are many exercises to do this and it is fairly easy to accomplish..again it is developing a "feel" for the rhythmic / harmonic aspects of the progression...example:

GM7 GM6 / Ami7 Ami6 / D7 D9 / GM7 GM6
// // // // // // // //
beats...................................................

expand this until your comfortable with one chord per beat ex: Am7 Am6 D7 D9...this takes time and practice but will be worth the effort to your playing

try "here's that rainy day" a nice rich harmonic progression with fairly easy chords that keep the melodic aspect of the tune.

play well

wolf
#15
I've found a nice trick is that you take one of the basic maj7 chord shapes. Gmaj7: 3x443x. Now you identify which notes are what intervals of the chord. So:
x
3 <-- fifth
4 <-- third
4 <-- seventh
x
3 <-- root.

So, from that chord, using logic you can derive lots of other chords. Just alter the essential notes and you can start working out Gmin7, G7, Gmin7b5, Gdim etc etc.

Now, you might say, well I already know those chords, they're really common, so you've told me nothing. But no! See, the thing is that if you start to learn all your chords like this, identifying the different intervals, you can transform other chords that might be voiced on different strings into other different chords.


It's a kind of short cut to knowing the chords without knowing them. I use it all the time. If I'm sight reading something and some weird ass chord with every other note in it altered comes up I'll just use my trick and work it out. Takes much less time once you start getting practice.


As for which standards. Well, not all the most popular standards are the easiest ones. Stella By Starlight is extremely popular and the changes aren't the easiest. You have to keep in mind that at some point you're not only going to be comping, you might also be soloing. So whilst I can comp to Giant Steps not to badly I couldn't solo over it to save my life.

My suggestions:

Autumn Leaves: it's just II V Is, in a major and a minor key. You can also think of the harmony to be following the cycle of fifths.

Blue Bossa: Just one key change, basic II V Is as well.

Take The A Train: The chords are fairly straight forward except for the D+ (some real books will use different augmented chords here, so I'm just saying + for conveniences sake. Though you may find +4, +4 +5, +5, + so take your pick). It changes key in one place so solo wise it isn't too difficult.

C Jam Blues: Blues in C that ends on a II V I. There are many ways to vary a blues so when you get into more subbing and stuff like that it'll help you out.

So What/Impressions: Pretty straight forward.


The rest of the tunes in Aebersold's Volume 54 that I haven't mentioned already.

Tune up is what I'm learning now and it's basically II V Is, so you shouldn't have too much of a problem.


Also, do some research on shell voicings and Freddie Green.
#22
Quote by branny1982
^sorry?
i just registered with name and email and i was away.





I was trying to be funny, but I think I failed miserably.
#23
Quote by branny1982
This is in C, but is it C major or C minor? I am finding it difficult to tell.


EDIT - i think i get it now, if it was C minor i would see the flattened numeral.
Looks like a bit of both. Like theres a couple of borrowed chords.

Be aware that some of the chords in fake books are wrong. It's mostly just a few chord names that could go either way, like a Bmb13b5 could be written as a G9 and vica versa. Just keep that in mind next time your putting numerals to your chords. Otherwise, ignore what I've said because it mostly doesnt affect us guitarist's.
#24
Two standards that are really easy to remember that I recommend are "Blue Bossa" and "Summertime". A good place to start.
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#25
Jazz+tabs=phail

Get a teacher, learn to read lead sheets, get the real book. Preferably the 6th edition.

Blue Monk
Freddie Freeloader
Sidwinder
500 Miles high
Blues in the closest

Theres a few simple standards.