#1
if you were to play 3rd fret high E string and 3rd fret B string that would be a 4th type of interval. but if u where to use the g major scale and then look at the same notes u see u r playing the 5th of the g major scale on the B string and the 1st on the E string which is the 1st, and 5th...so im confused here cuz its a 4th type interval..but ur playing the first and 5th tones...!!!!!
#2
it goes 5th ... 6th ... 7th ... root
you count from the lowest tone.

i have no idea why btw, but it just makes sense.
and no to the comment after mine.
#3
Quote by Unreal T
if you were to play 3rd fret high E string and 3rd fret B string that would be a 4th type of interval. but if u where to use the g major scale and then look at the same notes u see u r playing the 5th of the g major scale on the B string and the 1st on the E string which is the 1st, and 5th...so im confused here cuz its a 4th type interval..but ur playing the first and 5th tones...!!!!!


in terms of distance between 2 notes, 4ths are the same as 5ths... so D and G are a 4th interval.. they're also a 5th

up a 4th, down a 5th... same distance
#4
yeah i know. if u were to play 3rd fret on high E and B string its a 4th type of interval but whats confusing me (using G major scale for example) is that you are actually playing the 1st and 5th of the G major scale so y isnt it called a 5th?
#5
Quote by inflatablefilth
in terms of distance between 2 notes, 4ths are the same as 5ths... so D and G are a 4th interval.. they're also a 5th

up a 4th, down a 5th... same distance



o...ok lol i never knew that. i dont get how they r the same cuz they `sound pretty differnt to me..
#6
If you mean D and G it is a Perfect 4th
If you mean D and Abb it is a double diminished (or superdiminished I think) 5th


A perfect 4th and a perfect 5th are inverted intervals. If you have C and G, you have a P5th, but if you have G and C, it is a P4th.
As long as both of them sum an octave that means that they are inverted.
All perfect (and consonant) intervals are inverted in perfect intervals (I think unisons and octaves are perfect too)....
#7
Quote by Unreal T
yeah i know. if u were to play 3rd fret on high E and B string its a 4th type of interval but whats confusing me (using G major scale for example) is that you are actually playing the 1st and 5th of the G major scale so y isnt it called a 5th?


you always call 'intervallic distances' exactly what they are... i.e. D up to G is 'up a perfect 4th' or 'down a perfect 5th'...

that's slightly different to how you describe the function of scale tones... i.e the D in G major is a 5th.. it's a fifth because that's how it functions in the scale of G major.. but in terms of intervals, it can be called a 4th or 5th in distance from G
#8
D will always be the 5th of G, but G will always be the 4th of D, no matter what octave the notes are in, or what note is higher. It all depends on which note you are harmonizing from. C is the minor 3rd of A, but A is always the 13 of C.