#1
In 12 bar structure, the 1 4 and 5 are all dominant. Can someone please explain how any chord other than the 5 be dominant? Thanks
#2
It "can" be dominant because it's your music and you can play whatever you want. If your asking how it makes theoretical sense, it doesn't.
#3
Quote by matthewt
In 12 bar structure, the 1 4 and 5 are all dominant. Can someone please explain how any chord other than the 5 be dominant? Thanks


Simple...you replace any chord you want with a dominant chord. That's how. They may not be diatonic, but blues itself is rarely diatonic. It's just a quirk that blues has made use of because blues players like the dissonance it creates.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by matthewt
In 12 bar structure, the 1 4 and 5 are all dominant. Can someone please explain how any chord other than the 5 be dominant? Thanks


dominant chords create tension that feels like it needs to be resolved.... dominant chord blues gets its harmonic momentum from every chord deferring that resolution... it never comes..

this is why blues jams go on for hours and never stop... it's usually hard to bring the thing to a close

dominant chords can be used all over the place, not just on the V chord... check out the concept of secondary dominants.. they usually sound great and they're not diatonic either
#5
Well, it could be the use of secondary dominants (the dominant 7th of any chord when treating it like tonal centre) or a brief use of tonization (sp?) when you abruptly treat another note as the tonal centre. Or maybe because it sounds cool or something...
#6
another explanation of the blues..as good as any...

"...or maybe it sounds cool or something..."
#7
Quote by wolflen
another explanation of the blues..as good as any...

"...or maybe it sounds cool or something..."


That's basically it. Dominant chords are used because blues players like the dissonance they create, and pretty much anything can be played over them without sounding "out".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
pretty much anything can be played over them without sounding "out".


if that's that case, and virtually anything really could be played over dominant 7 chords, why do you think blues has such a limited melodic vocabulary?

(that isn't a criticism of blues, by the way)
#9
Quote by inflatablefilth
if that's that case, and virtually anything really could be played over dominant 7 chords, why do you think blues has such a limited melodic vocabulary?

(that isn't a criticism of blues, by the way)
Because it doesnt

Yeah sure, everyone that plays the blues will play pentatonics, but only because its easy to sound melodically nice with them. Blues will also use alot of sixth (normally natural, but occasionally a flat sixth would be used), flat fifth (very popular), chromatics and even the occasional flat second accidentals.

You'd also see things like guys using the minor pentatonic scale over dominant chords so it sounds like a sort of altered dominant thing.

Also remember, that blues is mostly about phrasing and rhthym, not so much complex melodic vocabularies and note choice.
#10
The blues progression is not meant to be a diatonic progression to any particlular key. It's like an over all tonality. The blues unfortunately has been watered down to the same 2 or 3 progressions but in the old days when its started there were many different chord progression versions.
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
Because it doesnt

Yeah sure, everyone that plays the blues will play pentatonics, but only because its easy to sound melodically nice with them. Blues will also use alot of sixth (normally natural, but occasionally a flat sixth would be used), flat fifth (very popular), chromatics and even the occasional flat second accidentals.

You'd also see things like guys using the minor pentatonic scale over dominant chords so it sounds like a sort of altered dominant thing.

Also remember, that blues is mostly about phrasing and rhthym, not so much complex melodic vocabularies and note choice.


oh yeah, I agree, it's probably 90% about phrasing... how you play your notes

but how did the blues get its vocabulary then? why THOSE groups of notes and not others? you'd think if the door was wiiiide open to play anything, you'd get whole tone scalar licks and all kinds of odd stuff
#12
Quote by inflatablefilth
but how did the blues get its vocabulary then?
Because pentatonics are actually a holy, mythical scale which is the only scale I'd call magical. Honestly, pentatonics are used in chinese, japanese, nordic, some southern european, native american, african tribal, some indian, indonesian (dont quote me on this) and even some middle eastern music.

Anyway, stepping away from that tangent...

Pentatonics were used in african tribal music. So when those poor Africans were abducted from their homeland, they took with them pentatonics. And when they were forced to work, they sung pentatonics to pass the time (songs which are suprisingly similar to army chants and sailor shantys). So when their descendants started playing the blues, they played the scale that their ancestors played.

Just before you ask, I think the idea of playing chords underneath came from creole musicians (rich, black, classically trained, descendant from french aristocracy and jamaican slaves). These guys probably hanged out with the guys descendant from the slaves and taught them a few things.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
Because pentatonics are actually a holy, mythical scale which is the only scale I'd call magical. Honestly, pentatonics are used in chinese, japanese, nordic, some southern european, native american, african tribal, some indian, indonesian (dont quote me on this) and even some middle eastern music.

Anyway, stepping away from that tangent...

Pentatonics were used in african tribal music. So when those poor Africans were abducted from their homeland, they took with them pentatonics. And when they were forced to work, they sung pentatonics to pass the time (songs which are suprisingly similar to army chants and sailor shantys). So when their descendants started playing the blues, they played the scale that their ancestors played.

Just before you ask, I think the idea of playing chords underneath came from creole musicians (rich, black, classically trained, descendant from french aristocracy and jamaican slaves). These guys probably hanged out with the guys descendant from the slaves and taught them a few things.


Well, there isn't much variation either:

dionic-tritonic-tetratonic-pentatonic-exatonic-eptatonic

One of them has to be in some kind of music