#1
My band is a big live show band, by which i mean we play our best stuff when were live, and we are loking for the best way to record ourselves live.

Im not talking like how to do a live take, but to actually record our live shows...
#3
video or audio?

i tihnk you just mic up the amps. i dont know what the quality would be like though.
#5
Quote by postmortem2006
Audio?

Some studios do live recordings. Ask around.

i think he means on a stage with people listening what they play.

try pluging into the PA or mixer but instead of all the speaker plugs going to the speakers, take one exit to a recorder. that might work. try first when rehearsing
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Last edited by ldnovelo at Aug 19, 2008,
#6
What is your budget?

Yamaha has digital mixers and paired with an Alesis HD24 can make a great on location recording setup. The only downside is you can spend more than $2,000 on that type of setup and need someone to look over and work the mixer.
#7
What is your purpose for the recording? For rehearsals, we use a Zoom H2, and the recording quality is really surprisingly good. Not like double-live-greatest-hits quality, but good enough that anyone who hears it might be surprised it was only one mic (mmm... okay... not technically one, but....) in a room.

Alternately, you're getting into some pretty tricky stuff.

Board mixes almost always sound like total and utter crap. Avoid it unless it is your only option. You'll be disappointed.

We recorded a live set at a concert theatre we played at. I brought my rig in and took a direct out from each channel on the mixing console (lucky enough to have direct outs, though they weren't pre-fader....wtf?) into individual channels on a Delta 1010. Since everything was miked up already, it was pretty easy at the stage end of things.

The trick there, though, was individual outs from each channel (you can get a 'sniff' off of an insert on the mixer channels too) to individual channels on the recorder. The Delta 1010 has ten inputs, and from there, went straight into Cubase.

With each mic on its own track, it was easy to mix, as you had a fair amount of control over the individual channels. Lots of bleed through the mics, but that's kinda the nature of a live recording.

The interface alone like that will run you around $500. Depending on your budget and future needs, you might be better off... and cheaper... hiring someone to bring a rig out.

My rig is not very portable, so it was a huge pain in the neck to haul the whole thing out, but it was our only half-decent option.

The results of that are on my band's website at www.now-here-this.com. The first few items in the mp3 player are from that recording.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
The easiest way to do a live recording is bring a laptop and a mixer that can record Stereo. Since pretty much everything is miced live, ask them if you can get the tap out of the mixer they use. Put the two 1/8" feeds (Left and Right) right into your mixer, and bam.
Gear:
Epi Les Paul Custom w/ 57 classic plus & burstbucker pro
Gibson SG Limited Edition, Crescent Moon Inlays
Dr. Z SRZ-65
Egnater 4x12 cab w/ Vintage 30s
#10
theres firewire, and usb mixers.
Gear:
Epi Les Paul Custom w/ 57 classic plus & burstbucker pro
Gibson SG Limited Edition, Crescent Moon Inlays
Dr. Z SRZ-65
Egnater 4x12 cab w/ Vintage 30s
#11
wait....how do those things convert the sound information to digital so the computer can understand it? and also without the laptop how do you record it? i may be missing something but im just letting you know what im not understanding....please explain

#12
It can because its an interface as well.

See here, http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Alesis-MultiMix-8USB-Mixer-with-USB-and-DSP?sku=630166

Thats one way to record WITH a laptop.

another way to get stereo audio from the houses mixer in your hands is through a little recorder.

something like this, http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Tascam-DP02FXCD-Digital-Portastudio?sku=241788


Sorry to confuse you haha.
Gear:
Epi Les Paul Custom w/ 57 classic plus & burstbucker pro
Gibson SG Limited Edition, Crescent Moon Inlays
Dr. Z SRZ-65
Egnater 4x12 cab w/ Vintage 30s
#13
ohhhhh ok....well could it work if I used my Mackie 1202 mixer with my Apogee Duet interface and my laptop?

EDIT: ohh wait....i wouldn't need my mackie it wouldnt make a difference becuase i wouldnt be able to control the mix using the sound mans mix board.
Last edited by Max-Roach at Aug 20, 2008,
#14
Yupp you can do it like that.

Do you know how to hook everything up?
Gear:
Epi Les Paul Custom w/ 57 classic plus & burstbucker pro
Gibson SG Limited Edition, Crescent Moon Inlays
Dr. Z SRZ-65
Egnater 4x12 cab w/ Vintage 30s
#16
No problem!

feel free to comment me if you have any questions!
Gear:
Epi Les Paul Custom w/ 57 classic plus & burstbucker pro
Gibson SG Limited Edition, Crescent Moon Inlays
Dr. Z SRZ-65
Egnater 4x12 cab w/ Vintage 30s
#17
I mentioned that board mixes almost always sound like total crap. Here is why:

Your typical small club setup has the band on stage in a room where the drums can easily be heard even without sound reinforcement. That means that all you get coming off the board for drums is a wee bit of kick and snare, and that's it.

Next... bass. Bass usually goes direct, so ALL the bass is going through the board.

Guitars.... guitarists are infamous for cranking it up to 11 and sending the sound person into damage control mode. Loud stage volume means practically nothing is required to go through the board to the mains... it's already too loud for the room.

Vocals - they *have* to go through the board and to the mains. Since drums and guitar are so bloody loud, you really have to crank the pants off the vocals so they can even be heard over everything else.

The end result is a board mix that is all vocals and bass, with virtually no guitar or drums.

Don't take a board mix if you can help it at all.

If you are playing a large club (like 700+ people kind of thing, things may be different, but not that much.

If you're playing an arena, you'll probably have a half-decent board mix.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
yea if anything you will want to get your own mix for the tape. A cheap setup would be to get an audio interface with two XLR inputs and preamps. Then set two mics on stands out in the crowd or right off the edge of the stage and record in stereo pair. This should give a fair result.

Running out of the board where the sound guy adjusts to his taste is never a great way to go as stated before.
#19
Quote by moody07747
... where the sound guy adjusts to his taste


Ah, yes, the other problem with board mixes. Stuff keeps fading in and out.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.