#1
I've come across this chord progression and it's puzzled me abit but it sounds pretty cool imo.

Bb>Dm7>Eb>Gb
Bb>Dm7>Ab>Gb>F

I've worked it out as;

I>iii7>IV>bVI
I>iii7>bVII>bVI>V

The main thing I want to know is why that flat VI resolves back to the root, something to do with voice leading?

And has the flat VI and VII got something to do with the minor scale or is there some kind of scale/mode i've over looked? i'm not familiar with anything that has a major 3rd and a flat 6th, 7th.

cheers, markus
#2
Quote by Markus85
I've come across this chord progression and it's puzzled me abit but it sounds pretty cool imo.

Bb>Dm7>Eb>Gb
Bb>Dm7>Ab>Gb>F

I've worked it out as;

I>iii7>IV>bVI
I>iii7>bVII>bVI>V

The main thing I want to know is why that flat VI resolves back to the root, something to do with voice leading?

And has the flat VI and VII got something to do with the minor scale or is there some kind of scale/mode i've over looked? i'm not familiar with anything that has a major 3rd and a flat 6th, 7th.

cheers, markus


the Gb chord is borrowed from the parallel minor key... so it I think your ear recongnizes it as related in a 'sad' way

Gb is very similar sounding to Ebm, and turning the 4th in a major key from major to minor is a very common 'ballady' type thing to do... that's the kind of thing you've got going on.. John Lennon used to do it a lot
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Aug 19, 2008,
#3
yeah i thought it had summat to do with the parallel minor and I've noticed alot of songs that use the IV>iv>I progression. So the resolution is credited to the fact that Gb is the relative major of Ebm?

i think i've got this understood, thanks dude.
#4
I'll help you out with the voice leading...

Heres how the notes from the chord Gb and Bb move.

Db - D 1 semitone
Bb - Bb 0 semitone
Gb - F 1 semitone

See that each note doesnt need to move very far to the next note in the next chord? Thats why Gb moves so well to the Bb chord.

As my understanding goes, bVI chords are used as a predominant chord (as in a chord you play right before a dominant chord), which is what you've done in the last measure of your progression.