#1
I'm 17, I've been playing for about 4 years but for a few reasons I'm not as good as I should be in that amount of time. I know basic theory (chords, circle of fifths, intervals, modes, etc.) and I can read music. I haven't memorized a bunch of scale patterns; I figure them out more by knowing the notes on the fretboard and what notes are in the scale. I can play at a decent speed but I'm no shredder or anything, and besides changing strings I don't know anything about guitar maintenance. If I wanted to teach in a year or two, what should I work on?
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.
#2
i recommend getting some lessons from a good guitar teacher, you want to be able to teach good technique to your students. knowledge wise however you want to know more than your students.
#4
most of my guitar teachers were only at the school to teach orchestra guitar is more of an afterthought. class always sucks. but then again it is a public school.
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#5
As much as I hate to say this... Since you're going to be approximately 19 when you start teaching, you'll have to learn some shreddy stuff. Your students will be young, and 99% percent of beginning guitarists are impressed by shred. They will also trust you more.

+1 to gonzaw's thing. You have to know how to teach.
#6
^ i disagree, most starting guitarists might be intimidated by that (shredding) i know i would've been. learning how to teach is definitely a good idea. on top of that learning some theory might be good because if you have more than one or 2 students, one of them is bound to ask "but why is this a minor chord and this a major?" you may not have to answer it right then and there but they're going to want to know and you need to be able to tell them.
#7
@z4twenny. Hmmm, since he's a teacher figure I don't know about intimidation. To each his own, though. He might play something shreddy and present it in a "if you're dedicated, you too can play like this" sort of way. That should encourage. But maybe because he's so young the students will see him more as a collegue or "competition" rather than a teacher. 19 is pretty young, no offence. I'm 19, and I don't think people could take me seriously as a teaching figure, just because of my age. People associate age with experience.

I think you have a point though, and I know where you're coming from. It's all about how he presents himself.
#8
Work with them to find out what their goals as a player are, how much they're willing to put in. Go from there, and don't charge too much, ya amateur!
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Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#9
Quote by thefoldarsoldar
Work with them to find out what their goals as a player are, how much they're willing to put in. Go from there, and don't charge too much, ya amateur!


lol

@ z4twenny: I have been taking lessons most of the time I've been playing guitar (from 3-4 different teachers), so that's a plus I guess. I was mostly concerned about the age thing (but if at 19 I can say I've been playing for six years, that's not too bad is it?) and how much theory I need to know. I could definitely explain the difference between a major and minor chord, at least.
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.
#10
For teaching beginners, that's fine. Just make sure you're a good teacher!

If you ever find yourself feeling that you have nothing to teach a particular student (be they a budding shred god or whatever), just be prepared to say "I don't think I would be the best teacher for you". What's wrong with that?
#11
I've tried teaching a couple of friends, and the hardest part isn't how much you know, it's actually teaching them what you do know that was really hard. I did get my best friend to be able to play some simpler stuff like sweet home alabama and smoke on the water and such, but he just doesn't have the time or the interest anymore. And I tried teaching my 9 yr old niece once, and that went horribly. I couldn't get past the stage of her not being able to press down the strings right.
#13
I've never taught before, but here are some thoughts about how I would prepare if I decided to do this.

- First of all, decide on your target market. Are you looking to teach beginners, beginner-immediate, intermediate, etc. Obviously, this will radically affect your plan. Equally important, decide on the style of music you will be teaching. This is part of making sure you know who you are as a player, and what you have to offer to younger players.
- Decide on your teaching philosophy. One philosophy is to ask the student, "tell me a song you would like to learn to play". Student responds with the name of a song that is hopefully not by an italian guy named Paginnini. You break it down, and say right, in order to play this, these are the skills we will need to work on. Another is to start with the building blocks, and go that way, throwing in some licks by existing artists to learn along the way to keep it interestingly.
- Come up with a syllabus, bearing in mind that it will be need to be flexible enough to modify as you go depending on the skills and progress of the student.
- Once you have a syllabus that you feel is a good first try, put yourself through it, with you as both the student and teacher. That should be very informative, showing you both your deficiencies that you need to work on as a teacher, and giving you a bit of feedback on what it would be like to go through your syllabus as a student. Also, as you go through the syllabus, make sure you are constantly asking (in student mode), "why are you having me learn this". It will be important to have those answers lined up and well thought out.

As I said, I've never done this before, these are just some thoughts on how I would personally tackle it. I think the fact that you've had a teacher for most of your guitar playing life will help you greatly.

Good luck!
Last edited by se012101 at Aug 21, 2008,
#14
if you are also in need of a job, consider getting a job having to do with children/people younger then you. for instance a camp councler or w/e.