#1
ok ive been writing pretty BORING chord progressions lately.
so a couple days ago i thought, why not add some chords that ARENT in the scale?
so i made a progression in Em:
Em - C - G - B dominant7 (last chord is B, F#, A, D#)
yes i know, D#, ISNT in Em, but i thought it sounded cool and it didnt sound tooo disonant.
is there any "key" to figuring out which chords are kinda outside the scale that sound cool?
like the B dominant7 in Em.
help please?
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#2
It's not the 1800s anymore, the concept of good and bad dissonance is all a matter of opinion. If it sounds good then do it.

Also, D# isn't in E natural minor but it is in E harmonic minor and that's one of the most widely acceptable notes outside of a scale situation.
#3
Quote by pwrmax
It's not the 1800s anymore, the concept of good and bad dissonance is all a matter of opinion. If it sounds good then do it.

Also, D# isn't in E natural minor but it is in E harmonic minor and that's one of the most widely acceptable notes outside of a scale situation.

so your saying, that if it was in G instead of E minor, i just add a flatted sixth?
and on all major scales, the most widely accpeted "dissonant" notes is a flatted sixth?
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#4
The use of a V7 chord in a minor key(in this case B7 in E minor) is extremely common. It's actually generally a stronger resolution as the D# is just a half step away from the E, and leads nicely into it(hence why the 7th degree of a scale is called the leading tone). This resolution is the reason the harmonic minor scale exists.
#5
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
so your saying, that if it was in G instead of E minor, i just add a flatted sixth?
and on all major scales, the most widely accpeted "dissonant" notes is a flatted sixth?


It might, depending on how you use it. Harmonic minor is a special kind of dissonant. Most composers don't even consider it to be dissonance since the leading tone of a scale should be only 1 semitone from the octave note so that it "leads" into it, harmonic minor gives a minor scale that "minor" feel to it.
#7
Tri tone substitution chords are great to use. the tritone is the same but there are other notes in the chord that give you a little bit of an "out" sound.

For example C7 is C,E,G,Bb. The E and Bb create the tri-tone that is the defining sound of a dominant chord that makes it want to resolve. The E and Bb are also the tritone of the
F#7 chord which is F#, A#(Bb),C#, E.
So you can substitute with a dominant chord starting on the root a tritone away from the root of the dominant chord you want to substitute for; in this case the F# root is a tritone away from the C.
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#8
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
ok ive been writing pretty BORING chord progressions lately.

is there any "key" to figuring out which chords are kinda outside the scale that sound cool?

To find chords outside your chosen scale it's good to learn some modulation (key change) techniques like:

Pivot Modulation
Chromatic Modulation (secondary dominants)
Tritone substitution

These are very helpful, but it's always good to let your ear be the judge as to what sounds good (i.e. theory wise it might be correct, but it might sound kak).