#1
hi. i know a few scales but don't know how to use them to make music aside from just going up and down. i try to improvise sometimes but it comes out crappy. My question is how do I make that NOT crappy. thanks

Rob
#2
First make a chord progression that fits in the scale (the triads of the chords are all notes in the scale). Then follow that progression, if you need advise on that google "Marty Friedman Melodic Control", there's a useful video that might help with soloing.
#3
Basically you know the root third and fifth will ALWAYS be good on that scale and you should try and end your phrases on those notes. (This is assuming you are playing over a static chord built off that scale, or if you're noodling alone)

Anyway, basically for now try and make little licks and runs and melodies ending on the root, third or fifth. Also if the scale has any weird intervals try landing on them and stuff before you resolve to one the other notes.

You'll feel out scales its really easy once you get the gist of it.
#4
just play around with an easier scale like the ionian. play notes on the high strings (not necasarily in order). use hammer-ons and pull-offs and ull get something good out of it
#5
Get your favorite pieces of art (songs) and
play, master, analyze, see what scale it is, and use the ideas from your favorite songs to form your own improvisations
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#6
Quote by pwrmax
First make a chord progression that fits in the scale (the triads of the chords are all notes in the scale). Then follow that progression, if you need advise on that google "Marty Friedman Melodic Control", there's a useful video that might help with soloing.


Its much easier to feel out new scales playing over nothing.. or maybe just a drone note of that scales root
#7
you do it not by going up and down, but by using intervals. each interval has a different sound that when put together will make a melody.

an interval in the distance between two notes in a scale. If you start on the first note of the scale and move to the third or fifth note in that scale, that interval would be a third or a fifth. the intervals will sound different depending on what scale you are using and how big the interval is. mess around with these ideas on your own to figure out which intervals make what sounds and how best to arrange them, or you can study how other musicians use them.
#8
Use your ear. Don't just go up and down the scale randomly. Use your familiarity with the scale to allow you to play seamlessly from your head using your ear. A good way to practice improvising with your ear is to just hum over the backing track. Then, work at being able to do the same thing, but with your guitar.
#9
the whole of the marty friedman vid is on google videos i just finished watching it VERRRY useful information

especially if you already know your scales
#10
thank you for your support every1. got another relate question. what are licks, riffs, runs, and phrases?
thx
#11
Quote by hazmatac
thank you for your support every1. got another relate question. what are licks, riffs, runs, and phrases?
thx
Notice how a singer will pause at the end of each line? That is a sort of phrase.

Notice how sometimes a lead player will play something quick and smart and than would usually hold the note? Thats a lick.

A run is where the notes used are all the notes of a scale or arpeggio played progressively. This is a run. You can also get chromatic runs, where the notes of the chromatic scale are played progressively. Remember, you dont have to use every note of that scale/arpeggio for it to be a run, 3 notes is sometimes enough.