#1
Ok I have the Hal Leonard Music Theory for Guitar book and I'm learning theory. It's all decently easy and the book does a good job of breaking it down to where I understand it but triads are just tricky for some reason. I get the basic priniciples

Lowest of the three notes in each triad is the root, and they consist of intervals, a third and a fifth of some kind and I get how they are named major, minor, etc...

What I'm having trouble with is in the book it says a triad can be played in any sequence and still form the same triad.

|-- This is a G major triad, becuase the root note G (5) on the D string is the lowest
|-3 note and the interval is a major third and a perfect fifth.
|-4
|-5
|-
|-

But I don't get this one which is says is a G Major triad also.

|--3
|--3
|--4
|--
|--
|--

Ok to me the root note would be the B (4) on the G string with it going to the D (3) on the B string and a G (3) on the E string. How is this a G Major chord if the G isn't the root not by not being the lowest note? Or is it?

I kinda ge the inversion thing with the triads but how do you figure out if it's an inversion triad or just a regular triad?

Thanks and hopefully this made sense to somebody.
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#2
The lowest note isn't always the root.

G=1
B=3
D=5

you can play the chord in different inversions

135- (I guess this would be a "non-inversion triad")

513

351

You can play G major triad with either a G, B, or D in the bass. it's still G major.
#3
So when do I know what one is the root. How isn't it the B or the D as the root note. How do I know that its the G?? Like how do I know the triad is a normal or inversioned triad??
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ESP LTD MH-50 W/ TREMOLO
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#4
You have three notes that made a G triad (G B D) so any of those notes can be in bass. As long as you have that three notes it'll still be G.

If you see G Bb D you should recognize it as a Gm triad and those notes in any order will still be Gm.

Sometimes an inverted chord will have a slash and a bass note next to it (G/D) if written but they don't always do that.
#5
I posted a guitar lesson using triad forms to spice up your rhythm guitar playing, all on strings 4-3-2. Check them out in action, it might be informative. Also on YouTube @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MchFiuP2T0c
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~ Storm Stenvold
~ http://www.guitarteacher.com
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~ Free Video Guitar Lessons, Jam Tracks + More!
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#6
Quote by kOoL AiD2420
So when do I know what one is the root. How isn't it the B or the D as the root note. How do I know that its the G?? Like how do I know the triad is a normal or inversioned triad??


Look at all the notes in the triad, and figure out the relations of them. Try each note as the root and figure which makes most sense being the root. For example, if B were the root then G is the 5# and D is 3b. Doesn't fit the normal triad formation (I think it is some sort of diminished, Bm dim?). What if D is the root? Then G is perfect 4th and B is the 6th. Also doesnt fit a nice easy form. How about G as the root? Then B is the Major 3rd and D is the perfect 5th. That fits nicely into the Major Triad pattern.

Each triad can be named with the root being each of the three notes. So any triad has three names (but one will invariably be simpler than the others). The G Major triad could also be the Bm diminished(?).
Stop whining and learn your theory!

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#9
Alright thanks guys. Really helpfull. But lets make sure I get this. Triads can come in any order. And pretty much some triads can be called different names. But for the sake of it choose the eaiser name or whatever name would fit with the rest of the song (kinda :S) Like the G Major could be a Bm augmented. Sounds pretty simple. This theory stuff is starting to click better and better and I can notice it improving my guitar skills even just learning off of songs becuase I kinda know what should come next, or what would sound good. I've been able to alter quite a bit of songs just from what I've been learning so sound cool to me ya know. I'll have to post them once I get a decent system to record them on.

Thanks everybody.
MY GEAR:

ESP LTD MH-50 W/ TREMOLO
ROLAND CUBE 15X
BOSS DS-2 TURBO DISTORTION
Dunlop Ultrex Jazz III
NEW: Dunlop Dimebag Crybaby from Hell
NEW: EHX: Small Clone Chorus Pedal
#10
Triads can have different names but it depends on what chord the triads is derived from.

For example the C major chord played at the nut (open chord) has 4 triads in it.

Strings (6-5-4)-(5-4-3)-(4-3-2) and (3-2-1). The roots of the C major chord is on string 5 and 2 so you have 1 triad and 3 inverted triads in that chord.

The name of the game is to know where the roots are.