#2
Perhaps others will be less discouraging than I am and tell you the the perfect fifth is a kind of solid reinforced kind of sound and the minor third is sad or the tritone is evil or whatever but the truth is they could be described for fifty pages and you won't know them any better. There's no real shortcut to gain that knowledge. You have to practice them and listen and get to know them yourself. Sorry if this is not what you wanted to read.
Si
#3
This sounds like a question off of your homework...

Major/minor (simply translated as happy/sad) as in the major third/sixth or minor third/sixth, harsh and dissonant (minor second or tritone), or pleasing. Sometimes hollow and empty, as in the case of the Perfect Fifth (or Fourth). There are a million answers for this question.
#4
Find out for yourself?

Seriously, just listen to them all and find out what each one does for you.
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#5
Quote by guitarmageddon0
what different sounds or "feels" do each of the intervals give?


They don't. Their sound is determined by context. What context, you ask? Well, that's the kind of thing people spend years in school studying.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
They don't. Their sound is determined by context. What context, you ask? Well, that's the kind of thing people spend years in school studying.


yep I was going to say it depends on the context

so +1
#7
INtervals are either Consonant or Dissonant or Semiconsonant.

Consonant intervals are set in 2 groups:Perfect and Imperfect.
Perfect intervals are the consonant ones that allow only one, eh how do you say it, harmonization or whatever (don't know how to explain it in english). It means they have only one type of consonance (even though they have various dissonant ones), and yes, it is the "perfect" intervals. These are: I, IV, V and VIII

Imperfect consonant intervals are the opposite, they allow more than one type, and are the III and VI intervals. They branch in minor and major, and both of them are consonant.

Dissonant intervals have also 2 branches:Absolute and Conditional...

Absolute dissonant intervals are the ones that when you enharmonize them, it gives another absolute dissonant intervals (it means that both of them when enharmonized give dissonant intervals, thus both are absolute): THey are II and VII intervals, both major and minor. For instance, a mayor 7th when enharmonized is a diminished octave (7-b8), well, I am not very sure if the diminished octave exists or not. OR you could have a minor second (b2), which is also an augmented unison (#1), both are absolute dissonant.

Conditional dissonant intervals are the ones that when enharmonized (enharmonized means for instance take a #3 and make it a P4th, etc, both are enharmonical) they give a consonant interval.
They are mostly diminished and augmented, except those that give dissonant intervals.
You can have for instance an augmented second (#2), which when enharmonized gives a minor third (b3), which is consonant. Of have a diminished 7th (bb7), and get a major sixth (6), etc..

Then you have semiconsonants, which are kind of in the middle of consonant and dissonant since they are ambiguous or sorts. They are the augmented/diminished 4th and 5th. They need resolution like all dissonant intervals, but augmented fourths resolve into major 6ths, and diminished 5th (or augmented ones I can't remember) resolve to major 3rd (well, check somewhere else for that or check by ear)....


Does that answer your question?
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
They don't. Their sound is determined by context. What context, you ask? Well, that's the kind of thing people spend years in school studying.


+1 in regards to feel.


You can learn what the intervals sound like by singing and/or playing them.

as Gonzaw mentioned, some are more dissonant, others more consonant.

My interval lesson
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 20, 2008,
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
+1 in regards to feel.


You can learn what the intervals sound like by singing and/or playing them.

as Gonzaw mentioned, some are more dissonant, others more consonant.

My interval lesson


You know, I don't find tritones as dissonant as say, minor 2nds or maybe major 7ths
#10
You know, I don't find tritones as dissonant as say, minor 2nds or maybe major 7ths


Many would agree with you. It could be that we've just become accustomed to them, as tritones are an integral part of Western harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
You can have for instance an augmented second (#2), which when enharmonized gives a minor third (b3), which is consonant


phrases like this one make my brain a damn mess, #2 is the same note as b3 right? then how can you name the same note both consonant and dissonant?

#12
Quote by Gacel
phrases like this one make my brain a damn mess, #2 is the same note as b3 right? then how can you name the same note both consonant and dissonant?



No, they are different intervals...

Saying 3 (major third) is different from saying b4 (diminished fourth), even though they are enharmonical.
So saying #2 is different than saying b3, even though they are enharmonical.
Now, maybe a #2 doesn't sound dissonant to you, because it is enharmonical with b3, which is a consonant interval, but in fact #2 is a dissonant interval.

Conditional intervals have that, they "sound" consonant, because their enharmonical interval is consonant. But one is consonant and other dissonant, independant of sound or feel they have.
THis is the opposite of Absolute dissonant intervals, which "sound" dissonant, because their enharmonic interval is dissonant too (like a #1 and b2 for instance)...

Quote by Archeo Avis
Many would agree with you. It could be that we've just become accustomed to them, as tritones are an integral part of Western harmony.


Well yeah, I would say that too...
Although when done at the right times, any dissonant interval can be "accustomed" and sound "right" or "pleasurable", etc...
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 21, 2008,