#1
This may sound dumb and I'm sure the end result wont have that great of a sound either but I'm not doing it for tone anyway.

I have some stereo speakers laying around and a very small tube pre-amp and I figured I would attempt a small practise amp. I already have it hooked up to a 4X12 and it works good. What I want to do is basically put a 1/4 jack in one of the speakers but I'm not sure how or whether there is more to it. Basically I just need a list of parts before I head out to circuit city or whether it will even work. Also it will need to be 4 ohms.
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
Last edited by CM_X5 at Aug 21, 2008,
#2
well what is the impedance of the cab and the speakers within the cab? Is it already 4 ohms? If so you're all set and can install a 1/4 jack, if not you will have to rewire everything (If it's a two or three way speaker there's probably a crossover in there which will probably have to be bypassed) to get the impedance to 4 ohms, if that's even possible at all.

I bring this up because a lot of stereo speakers have very low or bizzare impedance.
#3
I dunno all I know is that the output thingy on the back of that amp is 4 ohm. To wire it do i just wire the pos. and neg. wires to an output jack and that's it? I was worried there is a lot more to it.

I also just checked and it's 6 ohm. what if I just unhooked the other small speakers and had it wired directly with the 12" would it work out ok? Or will 6 ohm on the cab not matter?
Quote by Jearl

...dont play Fender just because its Fender.

Gear:
Ibanez SZ520QM
Peavey Rotor EXP
Squier Bullet (heavily modified)
Mesa Roadster Head & 2x12 cab
#4
I think it is a little risky given that those stereo speakers wont be voiced specifically for a guitar, and therefore you are taking risks for something which might have minimal profit at the end of the day.
#5
I'd consider leaving the cross-over in to protect the tweeter as it's power handling is significantly lower than the woofer. If you remove the corssover, the tweeter would share the power with the woofer equally if they have the same impedance. In less expensive stereo speaker cabs the crossover is usually just a capacitor in series with the tweeter to bolck the low frequencies and pss the highs. The "woofer" is often a fed the full freq range and sounds bassy simply because of it's response.
Moving on.....
#6
I've tried it
you don't get any volume and it sounds like poop

they're aimed at reproducing wide ranges of sound accurately. Not being very loud at everything under 5khz like a guitar speaker it