#1
So i got a music theory book and ive been learning all these basics and stuff real nice. But there's like triads Major minor then 1st inversion then 2nd inversion and there's like 40 chords lol. So i want to commit them all the memory but i don't really know how to go about doing it. Any tips or like exercises?
#2
Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale, learn the rules of chord construction...you'll never have to memorise another chord.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by steven seagull
Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale, learn the rules of chord construction...you'll never have to memorise another chord.


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#5
yeah learn how to make them lets say for example you know this chord
----------
----3------
----3------
----3------
----------
----3------
its a Gm7

now lets say a song asks you to play Gm7#5
if you know the fifth if on the b string you could just raise it a half step instead of memorizing a chord
so you would have this without memorizing
----------
----4------
----3------
----3------
----------
----3------

so its better and more musician like to learn why things work than to learn what they are if that makes any sense
#7
learn open position chords and how to alter them, and then the rest of the chords are basically barred or shifted up
#8
ya i know how their made and all that i mean like how do i get it so i can use them off the fly and i don't have to think about it for a sec
#9
Quote by steven seagull
Learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale, learn the rules of chord construction...you'll never have to memorise another chord.

Exactly. Once you know all the chord formulas, you don't need to memorize anything. Even though it does get engraved in your memory.
#11
Quote by tona_107
still haven't told us (me) which book.

oh sorry its Hal leonard Guitar Method, Music Theory everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask by tom kolb lol that last part of the titles really cheesy. but its a great book im on page 40 and already had lots of aha moments.

So about memorizing the fret board. this seems really hard. Theres a little exercise in the book that say play say G on E string then A then d g b e then do it back up and do a different note each day till you know all of them...but im not so sure if it will work. Think i should get one of those like Master the fretboard books.
#12
Quote by Shecter78787
oh sorry its Hal leonard Guitar Method, Music Theory everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask by tom kolb lol that last part of the titles really cheesy. but its a great book im on page 40 and already had lots of aha moments.

So about memorizing the fret board. this seems really hard. Theres a little exercise in the book that say play say G on E string then A then d g b e then do it back up and do a different note each day till you know all of them...but im not so sure if it will work. Think i should get one of those like Master the fretboard books.

theres a good program i think its called fret pro or something totally worth looking in to if you spend a couple ofo minutes a day you should memorize the fret board like in a week

EDIT: http://www.tabguitarlessons.com/advanced-fretpro.htm
should be free the price thing is so you could get tips or downloads or something
#13
Learn basic major, minor, seventh and suspended chords and then learn how to make adjustments to them.