#1
So this tuesday, im heading into the Studio for 5 hours with my band, its only 30 bucks each so its not to bad but how do we make the most of our time? So do you do an on the floor recording with all of us at once, then do the vocals over top (we did 3 songs mediocrly in 3 hours last time when we did this way) or do we record Bass+Drums, then the Rythm Guitars, then vocals then solo guitar? This CD is going to be played on the Radio in our town, and In New York so i want to make it perfect!

Also, any other general tips for it are welcome weve only been in once, and it was a mess but we werent paying for it so meh haha. This is a whole new Recording.
Last edited by Tubyboulin at Aug 21, 2008,
#2
You generally do not want to record live unless you're really strained for time.

Drums, bass, guitars, vocals.
#4
I think you should do things however you're most comfortable
and feel free to be picky. You're paying for it, after all. You shouldn't just settle, no matter how much your bandmates might hate you by the end of the day. If you want to be proud of the end result, you should be as involved as you can in the mixing and recording process as you can.
Give the engineer a CD that you want your music to sound like afterwards. That will help them out a lot.
#5
^ Im the reason we are coming back to the studio actually Our manager/leader person thought said we could probobly just send the songs we recorded for free to the radio stations, but i told him id rather pay the Money and Do them right, then have a bunch of mediocre ones.

I havent actually heard the mix of the original time we went in, so ill take a listen to that and tell the engineer if theres anything i feel could be done better i suppose. He teaches at my highschool, and ive known him for years so yeah lol

Thansk for the advice!
#6
Quote by Arbitror
You generally do not want to record live unless you're really strained for time.



Disagree. I think it is the best way as everyone can play with the same energy as they would live.... because it's... well.... live. A lot of people find it easier to play live than to listen to a recorded track and play along. You get the eye contact, vibe, everything.

Once you have your live tracks down, you can go back later and edit, punch in, whatever anything you're unhappy with. From there, overdub additional guitar parts, alternate guitar parts, solos, vocals, backing vocals, etc.

It's efficient and easy... if the studio is set up to do something that elaborate.

Now, that said... we did our album at my place. Because I only have ten inputs to record simultaneously, and we wanted as much flexibility over individual parts for mixing, we did this:

1. Whole band plays together in the room. Record seven tracks of drums, the bass, and a guitar and vocal. The drums and bass are kept, the guitar and vocal are to be replaced later, but help when doing overdubs so that people know where they are in the song.

2. Record guitars (and guitar layers) as overdubs, replacing original 'live' guitar tracks.

3. Record lead vocal, replacing original 'live' vocal.

4. Overdub loads of backing vocals.

That worked out quite well.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Oh.... five songs in five hours is fast, fast, fast. When people come to my place to record, I always tell them that it is a balance between how much time they want to spend sweating over how small a detail.

I had a couple of bands in (hardcore punk) who nailed off about 8 songs in 6 hours or so. That was entirely live off the floor, no overdubs, just record, mix, and out the door.

We took our time with our CD because we could. It took us about six months, on and off for ten songs.

Generally, I suggest two six-hour sessions for three or four songs. Day one is bed tracks - bass and drums. Day two is guitar and vocal overdubs. I'll mix it later on my own and have the band come back to tweak it once it is done to my tastes.

Needless to say, when you spend more time sweating over small details, the end result will be far superior to spending little time sweating over anything.

Examples:
- 8 songs in a day - http://www.myspace.com/thesubversives
-3-4 songs in two days - see my profile for the covers of Shine, Come Down, Better Man.

If you're looking for radio play, you might want to go with 2 songs in five hours and take at least a bit of time with it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
I recorded over two full days and we only got three songs done. At the start of the two days we had nothing ready. As in, set up gear, soundproof room, mic the kit etc etc. The two days also included the mixing. We recorded live. We had a seperatemixer for the drums that had like 6 or 7 inputs, was EQ'd seperately and then fed into the amin mixer in one input line. The only complaint i have really is that the drums came out rather toneless. I dunno is that because of the way they were recorded or the way they were EQ'd but they are kinda dead.....

Just thought i would throw that in there
#9
Quote by axemanchris
Oh.... five songs in five hours is fast, fast, fast. When people come to my place to record, I always tell them that it is a balance between how much time they want to spend sweating over how small a detail.

I had a couple of bands in (hardcore punk) who nailed off about 8 songs in 6 hours or so. That was entirely live off the floor, no overdubs, just record, mix, and out the door.

We took our time with our CD because we could. It took us about six months, on and off for ten songs.

Generally, I suggest two six-hour sessions for three or four songs. Day one is bed tracks - bass and drums. Day two is guitar and vocal overdubs. I'll mix it later on my own and have the band come back to tweak it once it is done to my tastes.

Needless to say, when you spend more time sweating over small details, the end result will be far superior to spending little time sweating over anything.

Examples:
- 8 songs in a day - http://www.myspace.com/thesubversives
-3-4 songs in two days - see my profile for the covers of Shine, Come Down, Better Man.

If you're looking for radio play, you might want to go with 2 songs in five hours and take at least a bit of time with it.

CT



agreed. we're getting roughly 10 hours for our 3 songs, but thats just us.
we're wanting to concentrate on the mixing, and bring out certain features, so yeah, if you want a more professional feel, you probably want longer than 5 hours for 5 songs.
#11
There's also the things you don't think about as far as setting up goes. It's not just a matter of setting up your gear for a live show and expecting to be ready to record.

-selecting mics - involves some trial and error if you want to take the time to get the best combination of mics for your gear. The only way to do that is set up the mic, record, play back, try another mic, record, play back both and compare, etc.
-placing mics - again, more play, record, play back, move mic, lather, rinse, repeat

Don't underestimate the importance of those steps. It can make a world of difference to the end product.

Then there is:
-establishing headphone mixes
-setting record levels
-discovering that not being able to see the singer because he's in a separate booth is throwing somebody off, because he takes his cues from someone else... or that sort of thing.
-adjusting headphone mixes
-finding out that part you thought sounded fine live suddenly doesn't sound so good when it is under the microscope and needs to be fixed and reworked
-tracking down crackling cables, excessive hum, etc. that wouldn't be such a big deal live, but you don't want them on your recording.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
you need to at least have each intrument on its own track. my band is lookin at recording with a local guy who has a house to record at. each room gets a guitar or bass amp setup in it, with the proper mic, and then we'd all play together in the drum room with headphones, with the amps all mixed. then from there we're gonna dub vocals over it. it seems fast and a good way to keep the energy of playing together. from there we can redo solos and parts that need to be redone on the master track.
#14
That should be about perfect to do a good job.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
my band spent 10 hours on 1 song.

it took longer because the drummer had a hard time playing to a click at first. So about 4-5 hours was him.

Always takes the drums and the vocals the longest.
My Gear
Guitars:
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Amp:
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Effects:
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Pickups:
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#16
I recorded 4 songs with a group of 3 other musicians, and it took us several days to get it all done. I didn't keep track but it must have been at least 10 hours.
#17
And then there are bands who spend literally years making an album. Not just writing... the recording process. Working with producers like Mutt Lange who are uber-perfectionists, the end result is nothing short of perfect in all conceivable ways. Those guys will spend an entire day auditioning different mic and preamp combinations for a single snare drum for a single song.

Like most other things, the amount of time you put into it will reap its rewards. There is, of course, a law of diminishing returns. Spending ten years on it won't really make it that much better than spending three years on it, and yet spending ten hours on it will be hugely better than spending three hours on it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.