#2
try Eb instead of D#. play an Eb scale over it and see how it sounds. that would be the easiest to try first. if not ask again

EDIT: you could also consider it as E phrygian. treat the D# as a "leading tone" to E. use the E as the dominant of A
Last edited by vjferrara at Aug 22, 2008,
#3
yh you cant have a D and a D# in a scale it has to be D and Eb.

are there any other chords or a riff you could give us?
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#4
D# and Eb are enharmonic chords so you don't need to try Eb you are already using it and using the Eb major scale would work just fine(nm i was wrong)

EDIT exept for your F and G should be minor so i am not sure right now i just woke up and will get back to you on a scale
Last edited by lbc_sublime at Aug 22, 2008,
#5
Quote by Musicman_91
In wich key are these chords and wich scale should I use to solo over them?

D F G D#
Well, you cant actually play any one scale over that progression and fit perfectly. Assuming those are major chords and not powerchords.

You could play "play the changes," which means to treat each as an island, so to speak. This means you will play a different scale over each different chord, so you could play D pentatonic major over the first chord, the F major pentatonic over the next and so on. Generally, most people find this a little hard to do if they're not used to doing it. If you choose this option, dont get discouraged if you get a little lost or it sounds a little clunky.
#6
Quote by demonofthenight
Well, you cant actually play any one scale over that progression and fit perfectly. Assuming those are major chords and not powerchords.

You could play "play the changes," which means to treat each as an island, so to speak. This means you will play a different scale over each different chord, so you could play D pentatonic major over the first chord, the F major pentatonic over the next and so on. Generally, most people find this a little hard to do if they're not used to doing it. If you choose this option, dont get discouraged if you get a little lost or it sounds a little clunky.



Its powerchords in drop D and at the moment they are the only chords in the song.

I thought of "playing the changes", but I don´t like the sound of it...

In my world D# and Eb are the same...don´t know about yours...
#7
Quote by Musicman_91
Its powerchords in drop D and at the moment they are the only chords in the song.

I thought of "playing the changes", but I don´t like the sound of it...

In my world D# and Eb are the same...don´t know about yours...
That changes alot. BTW, I usually put a 5 at the end of a chord to mean its a powerchord, like X5

Bb major works perfectly over it. Enjoy.

Read up about circle of fifths. That should give you reason why Eb is different to D#.
When you have scales its usually best to have a different letter for each scale degree. So C# major should be C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C# instead of C# Eb F F# G# Bb B# C.

You also shouldnt have any key signature apart from F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb C G D A E B F# C#. Otherwise you start sharping your sharps and it gets complicated.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
That changes alot. BTW, I usually put a 5 at the end of a chord to mean its a powerchord, like X5

Bb major works perfectly over it. Enjoy.

Read up about circle of fifths. That should give you reason why Eb is different to D#.
When you have scales its usually best to have a different letter for each scale degree. So C# major should be C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C# instead of C# Eb F F# G# Bb B# C.

You also shouldnt have any key signature apart from F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb C G D A E B F# C#. Otherwise you start sharping your sharps and it gets complicated.


Sounds good to me I´m selftaught so I´m no expert in theory.

Thanks!