#1
i'm learning all the modes of the natural minor scale, but the website im learning from is messed up, and the page on minor locrian wont load. Can somebody tell me the notes in the minor locrian mode?

also, is there a way to figure out the modes? or do i just have to memorize how to play them?
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#2
here's how i do modes. start with major and go in a circle. C major.D dorian.E phrygian. F lydian. G mixolydian. A aeolian. B locrian.

every one of those modes has the same key signature, you just start on a different note.

D major. E dorian. F# phrygian. G lydian. A mixolydian. B aeolian. C# locrian.

you understand that way of explaining it? basically all you have to do is learn your major scales and learn to start them on a different note but keep the same key signature
#3
The natural minor scale is itself a mode of the major scale.

Check out my second post in the following thread. It is massive but is all about modes. And it might help explain Modes
Si
#4
I have a question about your post:

Quote by 20Tigers
Dorian Mode = W H W W W H W
The notes are 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

If you compare this to the Ionian Mode you will notice the intervals between the scale degrees change. For example the distance between the 1st and 3rd scale degrees has changed from two Whole Steps in Ionian Mode to one Whole and one Half step in Dorian Mode. The 3rd scale degree is now a minor third interval and this is noted with the b3. Similarly the 7th is also minor.


What is the reason that the 3rd and 7th are altered first, and they are altered a fifth apart, and then the relationship goes dropping one degree, etc?
Is it because of the way tetrachords are placed or something? (just like that is the reason for alterations in major scales, etc)
#5
Locrian is a minor scale with flattened second and fifth degrees.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by gonzaw
I have a question about your post:
What is the reason that the 3rd and 7th are altered first, and they are altered a fifth apart, and then the relationship goes dropping one degree, etc?
Is it because of the way tetrachords are placed or something? (just like that is the reason for alterations in major scales, etc)


Yes that's right. It is the way the semitones are placed a fifth apart on one side and a fourth apart on the other. In the Major Scale there is a half step between degrees 3-4 and degrees 7-8 (7-1 the way I'ver written it below). As these half steps move one place to the left it lowers the note it passes. For example, when the half step moves from between 3-4 in Ionian to between the 2-3 in Dorian it moves left past the 3 lowering it in the process.

You could say that the half steps are a fifth apart and inversely a fourth apart on the other side. This is why when moving from Lydian to Mixolydian you lower the 7 and 4 which are a fourth apart (4-7) and inversely a fifth apart (7-4).

It's not something to get too caught up on, it's just something I noticed and don't even know if this is helpful to others but I found it very valuable. Recognizing this pattern allowed me to memorize the interval structures of all the modes in less than five minutes.
Si