#2
A flat key is one in which the key signature contains flats. eg. C minor = 3 flats:



This key signature also serves as that of Eb major. C minor and Eb major are therefore relative keys.

C minor = C D Eb F G Ab Bb

Eb major = Eb F G Ab Bb C D


A sharp key is one that contains sharps, eg. G major = 1 sharp:

Last edited by blue_strat at Aug 22, 2008,
#3
Eb and C minor are also known as relative keys. Their notes are enharmonic. The more common application for the name enharmonic keys is keys such as F# and Gb Major. Same pitch, but different not names.
#4
^ Ah yeah, sorry. Got that mixed up

Cm and Eb are relative keys, not enharmonic.

F# and Gb are enharmonic keys, as they are exactly the same, but described using different key signatures:



Last edited by blue_strat at Aug 22, 2008,
#5
I'm still so lost. Maybe my brain is just retarded :|
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i regret nothing.


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#6
Sharp keys are keys which have a set of sharps.
Flat keys are keys which have a set of flats.
Enharmonic are ones which have the same notes, regardless of sharp or flat, but start on different notes, and differ by being major and minor.
#7
RELATIVE

C major and A minor are "relative" keys. The reason for this is that the notes of both of these keys are exactly the same. C major = C D E F G A B (no sharps or flats) and A minor = A B C D E F G (no sharps or flats). They contain the same exact notes, you are just using A as the root in A minor and C as the root in C major.

PARALLEL

The phrase typically explained along with "relative" is "parallel". Parallel keys would be different keys with the same root. For example, C major and C minor are "parallel" keys because they contain the same root but different notes. F major and F minor would be parallel keys, while F major and D minor would be relative keys because they have different roots but contain the same notes.

relative keys
F major = F G A Bb C D E
D minor = D E F G A Bb C
both only have a Bb and no other accidentals.

ENHARMONIC

Now, the phrase "enharmonic" is used to describe notes or keys that, for theoretical reasons, have the same pitch but are labeled differently. For example, C# and Db are technically the same note, but labeled differently. E and Fb are the same note, just labeled differently. The key of F# and the key of Gb will technically contain the same notes pitch-wise, but one will use all flats and one all sharps (see below):

F#__Gb
----------
F# = Gb
G# = Ab
A# = Bb
B = Cb
C# = Db
D# = Eb
E# = F

Make sense?
Last edited by PSM at Aug 22, 2008,
#8
That cleared things up. Thanks.
Quote by die_kenny_die
ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?