#1
Hello there guys I'm mainly an electric player but my mums friend is bringing her little go over to where I live in the hope that I can flip her right handed guitar to lefty. I am lefty myself so have gone through similar experiences myself. Shes not a serious player as she is only around 7, but just wants to get her hands on a guitar and start to enjoy playing. Now its only a cheap nylon string I am imagining, and I doubt her parents want to splash out a lot of cash in order to get something especially left handed so they were hoping I could flip it.

So if I just put the strings on the other way will that work, all will there be to much fret buzz etc. If so could I file in some of nut grooves to accommodate the larger wound strings, and put some graphite in the nut grooves which are to big or something? I am assuming that flipping it with out a nut change is do-able, obviously it won't be perfect, but it should be good enough to muck about on right? And do you know any little tricks to stop fret buzz etc.

Anyway thanks guys
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#2
Classical guitars are the easiest of all to change from righty to lefty. For the most part, the bridge and saddle are so slightly compensated as to not make much of a difference for intonation, and the nut slots should already be filed to accommodate nylon strings, which are fatter all the way across. There's no difference inside the guitar in regards to bracing so you're good there as well. If you should have an issue with action, you could shim up the saddle a tad bit. I'd use something like a piece of an old credit card. Something rigid and not paper or cardboard. Those make lousy shim's as they don't allow the string vibrations to pass through as cleanly. If you do need to shim it, make sure your shim piece is the same length as the saddle so you don't wind up with air gaps underneath. You want positive contact all the way across between the bottom of the saddle and the wood of the bridge.
Get a new set of strings and have at it. Before stringing it up for lefty, test fit each string in it's new position in the nut slots to see which you may need to widen. Note I said widen, not deepen. You only want to be making them a little wider to fit the new string, but don't make them any deeper than they already are.
Make sure you wrap the strings up and tie them off correctly at the bridge and at the tuners. You should be good to go.
#3
Don't forget to turn the saddle around so it's facing in the opposite direction. You shouldn't have to shim it.
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 22, 2008,
#4
If she is just starting out guitar, then fret buzz shouldn't get in her way, I'm sure she wouldn't care as long as the guitars fret aren't soundless with buzzing, plus I'm pretty sure you'd have to try pretty hard to get fret buzz in the lower parts of the neck, where she'll probs be playing her first open chords.


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#5
right so like i said im noob to classical really. So when restringing you to the little not thingy and the bridge, and at the tuning pegs right? And should i flip the saddle or not?
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#6
Go here to learn how to tie off the ends of classical strings: www.frets.com

Yes, flip it end for end. You'll be swapping the high and low E ends of the saddle for each other, which are the two outermost strings of the guitar.
#7
ok cool thanks guys
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus