#1
I started adding in the blue note to the minor pentatonic making it the blues scale.
I noticed right away the dissonance sound to it.
My question is how should you utilize the blue note when playing the blues? Should you use it strictly as a passing tone?

How do most blues players take advantage of this note?
#2
Should you use it strictly as a passing tone?

Usually.
Call me Batman.
#3
Mainly as a passing tone.

The passing tone isnt just the b5 either.
If your playing funk, you can use the b3 as a passing tone into the 3. Most effective when hammered on. Seriously, go try it.
#5
Quote by statocat
I started adding in the blue note to the minor pentatonic making it the blues scale.
I noticed right away the dissonance sound to it.
My question is how should you utilize the blue note when playing the blues? Should you use it strictly as a passing tone?

How do most blues players take advantage of this note?


listen to and learn some blues solos. That will give you an idea of how other musicians treat the "blue note". You can decide for yourself what you should or shouldn't do.
shred is gaudy music
#6
bend into it.

if yo ustart having a nice touch on bending, this note works really well.

but other than bending, its used alot as a passing tone.

one way to use it that i do in almost all of my really blues solos is to find that sweet spot in the rhythm, and just pound this note over and over again, to get that really "emotional" wailing feel (this is just what i call it, it reminds me of someone moaning). but thats just me. use it as you wish.
#7
Quote by PinkFloyd73
bend into it.

if yo ustart having a nice touch on bending, this note works really well.

but other than bending, its used alot as a passing tone.

one way to use it that i do in almost all of my really blues solos is to find that sweet spot in the rhythm, and just pound this note over and over again, to get that really "emotional" wailing feel (this is just what i call it, it reminds me of someone moaning). but thats just me. use it as you wish.


do you mean bend into it from the 4 ?
#9
you can bend into any note. The concept is not "blues note" specific.

you can hang on them
you can use them as passing notes
you can bend to them
you can bend from them

there are no rules, just personal choices.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 22, 2008,
#10
it depends what chords you're playing over.

this is why blues uses a lot of 7th chords, due to the addition of a b7th which meshes well with the blues note due to it being a b4th.

so basically, if you're not playing over 7th chords then you would use it as a quick chromatic passing tone...
#11
I usually like to do a slow bend to build and release tension that goes 4->b5->5. For example, in E blues, you'd hit the A, bend to a Bb slowly and then bend to the B slowly.
#14
Quote by gonzaw
What was the blue note?

The diminished fifth in a blues scale?

Yeah, the b5 is usually referred to as the blue note, though it's certainly not the only out-of-key note that can be put to good use.