#1
I've recently got into learning some different scales, but I've notcied that I always play vertical scales, whilst many of the guitarists I admire are always playing their scales horizontally, from the low E at the lower frets to the high E at the higher frets...

I'll be honest, I have no idea how to do this. I've looked at scale charts and tried to figure it out, but I still have no idea how you're supposed to construct scales like that.

Does anyone have any advice, tips or websites they could give me to help me out?
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#2
just take the regular scales and find the lowert octaves or equal notes
#4
I think he means like diagonal, starting at say 3rd fret on the low e E and finishing at say 12 on high E. In which case, a scale does not equal a small boxed up pattern at a certain part of the neck. Learn the whole scale across the fretboard, then it might make sense.
The more you know, the less you understand.
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#6
Quote by Smokey Amp
I've recently got into learning some different scales, but I've notcied that I always play vertical scales, whilst many of the guitarists I admire are always playing their scales horizontally, from the low E at the lower frets to the high E at the higher frets...

I'll be honest, I have no idea how to do this. I've looked at scale charts and tried to figure it out, but I still have no idea how you're supposed to construct scales like that.

Does anyone have any advice, tips or websites they could give me to help me out?


This is why you shouldn't learn patterns, you should learn the notes of the scale.
#7
Quote by Smokey Amp
I've recently got into learning some different scales, but I've notcied that I always play vertical scales, whilst many of the guitarists I admire are always playing their scales horizontally, from the low E at the lower frets to the high E at the higher frets...

I'll be honest, I have no idea how to do this. I've looked at scale charts and tried to figure it out, but I still have no idea how you're supposed to construct scales like that.

Does anyone have any advice, tips or websites they could give me to help me out?

Learn the chord progression derived from the scale and draw it out on a blank fretboard as 6 string barre chords, you'll find that they account for the majority of the notes in the scale pattern. We have no problem memorising chords so attaching the notes to a chord can be an easier way of remembering a chunk of the scale. Thirds are helpful too as they allow you to move horixintally in vertical pairs of notes, this is a repost of some stuff I wrote in another similar thread not long ago...

I posted this in somebody elses thread, it's something that I found really helped to open up the neck for me. Basically you need to start "seeing" more possibilities on the fretboard, understanding how closely linked together chords and scales are really helped me, I pretty much look at them as the same thing.

In E minor, for example, if you want to play with thirds you could look at these notes...


e|--------------------
B|--------------------
G|-12-11-9--7-5-4-2-0-
D|-14-12-10-9-7-5-4-2-
A|--------------------
E|--------------------



If you look at a full fretboard diagram of the E minor scale you'll see that they're all the notes on the D and G strings. They're also the middle two notes of all the chords of the E minor progression, assuming you were playing full 6 string barre chords...they're actually the root (well, technically the octave of the root) and third of each chord in the progression. Each note on the G string is two notes further along in the E minor scale than its counterpart on the D string.

You'll notice they're great fun to muck around with...play them individually or as double stops, or for a simple but effective shred-sounding lick slide between the notes on the G string but pick the notes on the D...sounds a bit Vai-ish if you do it quickly, like this.



e|---------------------------------------------------------
B|---------------------------------------------------------
G|----12s11--11s9-----9s7----7s5----5s4----4s2----2s0-----
D|-14------12------10------9------7------5------4------2---
A|---------------------------------------------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------


5ths aren't as harmonically interesting for stuff like that but they're still useable, the 5th is a constant interval whereas the shift between minor and major thirds is what makes them sound so pleasing. however 5ths are perhaps more useful as a reference note within the scale, for example the 5th is a good place to start a run from if you find yourself stuck inthe rut of starting from the root all the time


That sequence of notes is pretty simple to learn, and because it's thirds the sounds are very recognisable...you know if you play it wrong because it doesn't sound right. More to the point, those notes is a 1/3 of the entire natural minor scale. Learning it as paired notes helps you get used to the intervals between strings and also steers you away from getting stuck in boxes. Also, make sure you learn the chord progression of the scale too. As an exercise get a piece of paper and draw a fretboard on it, up to the 14th fret will do. Then draw out the chords of the Em chord progression as full barre chords, from the open strings to the 12th fret...

Em F#dim G Am Bm C D Em

Just play each chord on your guitar, then do a little circle on every note you fret, and don't worry if any are doubled up. When you've finished you'll have a load of overlapping chord shapes, and if you compare it to a diagram of the full E minor scale across the whole fretboard you'll see that simply by learning the chord progression derived from the scale you've actually learned 90% of the notes in the scale pattern.

Exposing yourself (oo-er!) to the scale in as many ways as possible is the best way I've found to help you learn them. Don't just learn the notes, don't just learn the patterns, approach it from every possible angle to help you better understand it. Also, bear in mind that when you use E minor pentatonic then technically you're already using the E minor scale, it just so happens that you didn't use a couple of notes.
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
Learn the chord progression derived from the scale and draw it out on a blank fretboard as 6 string barre chords, you'll find that they account for the majority of the notes in the scale pattern. We have no problem memorising chords so attaching the notes to a chord can be an easier way of remembering a chunk of the scale. Thirds are helpful too as they allow you to move horixintally in vertical pairs of notes, this is a repost of some stuff I wrote in another similar thread not long ago...

I posted this in somebody elses thread, it's something that I found really helped to open up the neck for me. Basically you need to start "seeing" more possibilities on the fretboard, understanding how closely linked together chords and scales are really helped me, I pretty much look at them as the same thing.


That sequence of notes is pretty simple to learn, and because it's thirds the sounds are very recognisable...you know if you play it wrong because it doesn't sound right. More to the point, those notes is a 1/3 of the entire natural minor scale. Learning it as paired notes helps you get used to the intervals between strings and also steers you away from getting stuck in boxes. Also, make sure you learn the chord progression of the scale too. As an exercise get a piece of paper and draw a fretboard on it, up to the 14th fret will do. Then draw out the chords of the Em chord progression as full barre chords, from the open strings to the 12th fret...

Em F#dim G Am Bm C D Em

Just play each chord on your guitar, then do a little circle on every note you fret, and don't worry if any are doubled up. When you've finished you'll have a load of overlapping chord shapes, and if you compare it to a diagram of the full E minor scale across the whole fretboard you'll see that simply by learning the chord progression derived from the scale you've actually learned 90% of the notes in the scale pattern.

Exposing yourself (oo-er!) to the scale in as many ways as possible is the best way I've found to help you learn them. Don't just learn the notes, don't just learn the patterns, approach it from every possible angle to help you better understand it. Also, bear in mind that when you use E minor pentatonic then technically you're already using the E minor scale, it just so happens that you didn't use a couple of notes.


Great post. That'll really help me. I can see I have been approaching it the wrong way.

I'll definitely try this.

Thankyou.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."