#1
Well, I've been playing since april 2007( little over a year) and have had the dream of becoming a professional guitarist ever since. I play metal, mostly black/symphonic black / melodic death metal, you know, loud & with some melodies and some sick solo's
*Ill post a video of me playing soon, once I get some decent gear(Epiphone LP custom!) *
I can play Pantera, Lamb of God, Behemoth, Children of Bodom ( with Silent Night Bodom Night solo/lead!) and Kalmah songs.( Ofcourse, I can play anything 'easier' than that, but telling you I can play smoke on the water won't help, would it)
I practise 4 hours a day(most of the time) and play acoustic and electric( even some bass to get my fingers stronger) and write atleast one riff a day, sometimes even a whole song.

Ill post vid's soon, but you having this information already, could I become a good / professional guitarist?

A 14 years old guitar kid lol:")
#2
you sound like it will be very possible if you keep progressing at that rate. Of course most of the time talent has nothing to do with it, just pure luck.
#3
You can become anything you want if you put your mind and effort into it.

How bad do you want it?

Honestly though, hearing you prattle off song names from various groups is no way to guage a persons ability. Vids would help tremendously.

Is this all you play/practice? To become a really good guitarist you are going to have to expose yourself to a lot of different styles and genres to be well rounded enough to even start considering being great....
#4
Thank you and yes, it sounds pretty sweet!
Oh by the way, I'm also vocalist
Extreme vocals, no clean( grunts gutterals screams pig squeals frog twittles cradle of filth high-pitched screams)
Oh by the way, I REALLY REALLY want it, and my guitar teacher teaches me to play blues, funk, soul and reggae, so yeah, pretty diverse.
#5
Quote by LordPino
Thank you and yes, it sounds pretty sweet!
Oh by the way, I'm also vocalist
Extreme vocals, no clean( grunts gutterals screams pig squeals frog twittles cradle of filth high-pitched screams)
Oh by the way, I REALLY REALLY want it, and my guitar teacher teaches me to play blues, funk, soul and reggae, so yeah, pretty diverse.


Nice. Go for your dream with all your might and dont let anyone stop you.

Take it from a guy who's 34 and let a dream or two slip through his fingers....
#7
Thank you. One more question, how do you deal with school( VERY high education) and guitars? I spend about 4 hours a day in my room playing the guitar, but school needs about 2 a day ATLEAST, so can I just.. start playing a little less or will that make my skill drop really bad?
#8
You kids have to quit think that playing metal is the only thing.

Playing music and creating music are two different things. It has nothing do with "skills and practice" or pure luck.

If you keep a mind set like this you will be just another "guy" with skills. Print this stuff out put it away and read it in 3 years. I can almost guaranty you will be embarrassed.

Bille Jo Armstrong doesn't play metal, and I would definatley call him very successful.
#9
sounds like your putting your natural talent to good work, a recording/video would be nice though
i have about 0 natural talent but i practice all the time like you do and can play all kinds of metal/hardcore/rock (metalcore, melodic death, brutal death, mostly though)
but at this point you have just as much chance in the music industry as I or anyone else does
keep at it though
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#10
Don't rely on it. Get a stable career first then do guitar on the side and hope you get lucky. Although luck isn't the only thing, you also have to be very dedicated which gets harder and harder when you get older.
#11
There is no "good enough" or "bad enough" - it's impossible to judge or compare your progress against what other people have or haven't achieved. People learn guitar in different ways at different speeds and it's utterly pointles to try and measure yourself in some way - you're as good as you are and you'll get as good as you're going to be.

It's not a race because there's no end so don't treat it as such. Playing guitar is an ongoing journey, you never stop learning or progressing and how you learn, understand and ultimately use things is far more important than how much "stuff" you know.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
There is no "good enough" or "bad enough" - it's impossible to judge or compare your progress against what other people have or haven't achieved. People learn guitar in different ways at different speeds and it's utterly pointles to try and measure yourself in some way - you're as good as you are and you'll get as good as you're going to be.

It's not a race because there's no end so don't treat it as such. Playing guitar is an ongoing journey, you never stop learning or progressing and how you learn, understand and ultimately use things is far more important than how much "stuff" you know.



Damn, Seagull is a fricken genius.
#14
Wow that's pretty deep Seagull.

What gets me is everyone always picks a favorite guitarist that they try to be just like. They say I want to play just like dimebag or just like Slash. That's a good goal, and if that's really what you want to do go for it. Just keep in mind Dimebag Darell didn't come up with his style by copying someone else, neither did Slash, Van Halen, Daron Malakian, or anyone else for that matter.

If you want to be "successful" play what you want to play. Listen to tons of people and like everyone has already said, never, ever let somebody tell you to play this way or learn this way. Do some research on how some of the greats got their start and I bet you'll be pretty surprised.

Not to mention there are a lot of famous guiatrists that aren't extremely technically skilled. Tom Morello doesn't uses mainly single note and simple chords combined with effects. His technique is really pretty simple, yet most of his skill is in how he creates different sounds, not how fast he can play or how many chords he knows.

Just don't try to be like everyone else. Be yourself!
#15
The internet's a double edged sword - there's so much information out there now that you've got kids who've already planned their next four guitar purchases, effects chain and pickup swaps asking how to play Canon Rock before they've even touched a guitar, it's just plain daft.

It takes bloody ages to learn to play the guitar, and if you spend all your time worrying about the stuff you don't know you get absolutely nowhere. If I compare myself with what I read on UG I progressed pretty slowly when starting out, I don't think I attempted a solo for about 6 months and I didn't even find out what a pinch harmonic was for about 3 years. Thing is, because I wasn't really aware of all the stuff I didn't know I was happy to develop steadily and methodically at my own pace. That meant that everything I did learn I learned properly, I had some book I'd borrowed so when I started learning chords made a point of reading and understanding the bit about chord construction, when I learned barre chords I made sure I could find my root notes so I could actually use them. I still vividly remember sitting there for weeks just trying to hold down an A chord and get it to ring out clearly consistently. Changing chords was just a nightmare, took ages.

Everybody wants to learn everything at once - it's the video game mentality, turn something on and instant gratification. That's why crap like the Line 6 spider is so popular, it's got pretty lights on it and even has a "cheat code" to activate the hidden gain boost. That's probably the most retarded idea I've ever encountered, if I want cheat codes I'll go to Nintendo.

Rushing too far ahead and neglecting the basics in a misguided effort to get "better" in less time, or focussing on a single genre, or even worse a player (John Frusciante I'm looking at you!), is a recipe for failure. The stronger your foundation and the better your understanding of the instrument itself the more accomplished a guitarist you become. There's no point being able to mechanically sweep arpeggios or reproduce complex tabs like a robot if you struggle to pick out a simple melody or strum along to a basic rhythm. Guys like Vai, Satriani, Gilbert etc are amazing guitarits, but they got that good after learning everything else...I guarantee that every one of those virtuoso shredders out there could happily kick back and jam with the worst of us
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
Quote by steven seagull
The internet's a double edged sword - there's so much information out there now that you've got kids who've already planned their next four guitar purchases, effects chain and pickup swaps asking how to play Canon Rock before they've even touched a guitar, it's just plain daft.

It takes bloody ages to learn to play the guitar, and if you spend all your time worrying about the stuff you don't know you get absolutely nowhere. If I compare myself with what I read on UG I progressed pretty slowly when starting out, I don't think I attempted a solo for about 6 months and I didn't even find out what a pinch harmonic was for about 3 years. Thing is, because I wasn't really aware of all the stuff I didn't know I was happy to develop steadily and methodically at my own pace. That meant that everything I did learn I learned properly, I had some book I'd borrowed so when I started learning chords made a point of reading and understanding the bit about chord construction, when I learned barre chords I made sure I could find my root notes so I could actually use them. I still vividly remember sitting there for weeks just trying to hold down an A chord and get it to ring out clearly consistently. Changing chords was just a nightmare, took ages.

Everybody wants to learn everything at once - it's the video game mentality, turn something on and instant gratification. That's why crap like the Line 6 spider is so popular, it's got pretty lights on it and even has a "cheat code" to activate the hidden gain boost. That's probably the most retarded idea I've ever encountered, if I want cheat codes I'll go to Nintendo.

Rushing too far ahead and neglecting the basics in a misguided effort to get "better" in less time, or focussing on a single genre, or even worse a player (John Frusciante I'm looking at you!), is a recipe for failure. The stronger your foundation and the better your understanding of the instrument itself the more accomplished a guitarist you become. There's no point being able to mechanically sweep arpeggios or reproduce complex tabs like a robot if you struggle to pick out a simple melody or strum along to a basic rhythm. Guys like Vai, Satriani, Gilbert etc are amazing guitarits, but they got that good after learning everything else...I guarantee that every one of those virtuoso shredders out there could happily kick back and jam with the worst of us



Great explanation there, listen to the seagull, it has fared the seven seas and karate (wing?) chopped the techniques of guitar and fishing to dissect and analyse any possible aspect of it.