#1
So we recorded some of our songs in a studio, but we were kind of rushed and didnt completely finish mixing the tracks. Our end product was between good and mediocre because of the uneven-ness of the tracks, especially the drums.

So now i wanna know how, if possible, i can turn up the drums in the recording. If you wanna help or hear it, just go to Revive the Lifeless

Thanks
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#2
Go back to the studio and have them remix it?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
well you can use volume boosters, or gain on compression or just compression to make maybe bass and snare more punchy. This is the dilemma ive been going through for years because home recording wasnt good enough but you had time, and studio was better but you didnt have the time and get nervous. Now with new VSTs esp drum ones you can do it all from home and take your time.
#5
thats the thing, i forgot to mention...the only reason we were in such a hurry is because the recorder guy had to leave in 2 weeks, so we only had about 1 to record everything/mix. we only have the wmv. so we dont have the actual track file
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#6
If you can't remix, then you can use an expander on the entire mix, with careful setting of the attack and release you'll be able to increase the volume of the drums whilst leaving less punchy stuff alone. Won't be as good as a remix but it'll certainly help.
You could also do the opposite with a compressor (reduce the volume of none punchy bits) but using an expander might be easier and give clearer results.
#7
Sounds strange to me actually...
Even if you guys were rushing and I was at the computer mixing the song I would still take the time to get the levels to around where they should be before mixing down and sending you guys off with the file...and after that I would save backups so I could work on them again.

Is this a mid range studio or just some home studio you guys are going to?

At this point, the only real way I can see this working is if you wait for the engineer to come back to work on the song some more with you.
Last edited by moody07747 at Aug 23, 2008,
#8
moody +1.

A couple of things are suspect here. I know it doesn't solve your problem, but is worth pointing out as a lesson to anyone going to a studio - esp. if it is an independent person in a home/basement/bedroom studio.

1. He sent you home with a .wmv file? C'mon. That's lame.
2. .... and nothing else? Lame again.

Here is what you *should* get coming out of a digital studio, no matter where you go. I do this for anyone who comes to me, and I'm just a basement studio kind of operation, and it is an easy standard to live by.

1. An audio disk. Play it in your car on the way home or on virtually any CD player on the planet.
2. A data disk. This includes your project file as created in ProTools, Cubase, Logic, or whatever, as well as all audio and wav images. If you choose to go to another studio later to work on the same song a little more or tweak the mix or whatever, you can take your project with you.
3. The studio should also keep a copy of the data disk. That way, if yours gets lost, or whatever, you still have a backup in the archives.
4. Both data disks should have an unmastered copy of the song (basic final mixdown) in no less than 24-bit/44.1khz resolution. They should also have a mastered version of the song in both 24/44.1 and in 16/44.1 wav files. (if that studio did the mastering - they don't always, and under ideal circumstances, *shouldn't* do the mastering also)

About portability between studios:

If I wanted to be a bastard to somebody, I'd just give them all of their audio files and that's it. No project file. Just every single little clip of audio they ever recorded - every take, every edit, every mistake, everything. Sure you have all the audio tracks, but nobody will ever be able to make anything of them as all time references will be gone. Sure, you'll know it is a guitar part, but where does it go? Hahahahahaha! (not really THAT funny, but you get the idea....)

A nice person will finally take each track you did and export them as individual wavs that all start and end at the same time. That way, even if the project file gets corrupted, or if the studio you recorded at used Logic and the next guy has Cubase or ProTools, you can still work with it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Ok yea lemee answer all your questions
This is a pretty low end recording studio. It's not too bad but definitely not professional. When we heard the tracks on his speakers it sounded fine because they were realllly expensive speakers. The reason we don't have the track file is because each of them were like 5 gigs. We paid around 10 dollars an hour.

The track files i think ARE still in the studio, however the recorder guy is on the other side of the country in college so no way we can get to him.
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#11
yea around that big
i forgot which of the 2 programs he used to mix ours but one of them was called pro tools.
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#12
Something isn't right.

To put it in perspective, ProTools or not (because PT uses the same file formats as anything else, basically), one minute of 24 bit audio at 44.1 is about 15 megs. So, a four minute song would be 60 megs.... per track, but you said each track.

Okay... so let's pump that up.... a 32-bit file would be 120 MB at 44.1. Let's say he recorded it at 192Khz. That would be 480 MB. Recording *anything* at 32-bit/192khz is for all practical purposes, merely a pissing contest you engage for no other reason than 'because you can.'

Maybe each project folder was 5GB. No prob. Get rid of all the takes you didn't keep and dump 'em onto a DVD. Of course, too late for that now, but ...

This is suspect too.... his speakers may have been expensive, but if the mixes don't translate well from his speakers to yours, there are two possibilities:
1. He doesn't know how to mix (less likely of the two)
2. They're simply stereo speakers, and not monitors made for mixing.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
yea he said he wasn't very familiar with this program and that he used it only for maybe 3 years. hes not professional i can tell you that. he dropped out of high school to get a GED and hes only like 21. I didnt expect much but for that price, what are you gonna do?

My plan now is i guess to see if i can get to the recording studio, get those track files and split up the instruments into separate tracks/music files starting at the same time so i can modify the levels in a simpler program (audacity). Ya think that sounds good?
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#14
If you can get the WAV files for each track you can work with them but you would need a ProTools hardware/software setup to work with the original data files. You could however take those PT data files to another studio and have them remix for you which would probably be best. It will cost some money though...

If you get the WAVs you can import them into any sequencer such as Audacity...Reaper would be better IMO.
#15
yea the thing is im hoping maybe theres a person still working there who can help me extract those wav files for each instrument FROM the files before working on it at home.

reaper i think is a littttle bit more than i need :P i just need to adjust the volume, nothing special.

anyways thanks for all the help guys
maybe once i get all this fixed up i can show you guys the end product and tell me how it sounds
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV