#1
Alright, I recently read through "The Crusade," and am now reading through "Music Theory for Dummies."

Through the crusade I came across many questions that I figured I'd better just ask for the sake of the knowledge. And I have some questions that I've gotten out of "Music Theory for Dummies," as well.

IF you could just copy the list of questions below adn then answer them like taking a survey sort of, I would appreciate it very much.

1. When dealing with intervals, do you add them from the root note or the previously added note?

2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords?

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. )

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better?

5. If you were to write a riff with the same intervals as say... the intro to "Stairway to Heaven," then would your riff sound like "Stairway" in a different key, or would it just have that sort of feel?

6. Say you play an open E string, then play on fret 13 of that same string? I know it's a compound interval, but what would I call it?

7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types?

8. If, say you use the C minor, then would you still do everything to same? Like harmonize it, or would you harmonize the C major scale?

9. Are the I, IV, and V always major chords in all scales, and the ii, iii, and VI, always minors, no matter what scale or type of scale? And if the seventh is always diminsihed, where does the augmented come in?

10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar?
#2
I would like to know the answer to #3 also.
Nine planets surround the sun
Only one does the sun embrace
Upon this watered one
So much we take for granted


So let us sleep outside tonight
Lay down in our mother's arms
For here we can rest safely
#3
1. When dealing with intervals, do you add them from the root note or the previously added note? Depends on the situation, usually from the root note though.

2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords? No, there other 3 note chords such as suspended, and then you have a bunch of rare variations, (#5, etc).

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. ) Open position chords are just any chord, played in the open position, usually doubling some of the notes, A Major is A - C# - E. Same thing with barre chords, a note may be doubled. Open position chords try to utilize all 6 strings, therefore doubling up notes is necessary for triads.

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better? Arpeggio shapes are more of a "solo" thing, they are simply the notes of a chord played seperately.
5. If you were to write a riff with the same intervals as say... the intro to "Stairway to Heaven," then would your riff sound like "Stairway" in a different key, or would it just have that sort of feel? Depends on your note choice and phrasing. It will most likely remind you of Stairway.

6. Say you play an open E string, then play on fret 13 of that same string? I know it's a compound interval, but what would I call it? Minor 9th.

7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types? As far as I know harmonizing a scale means taking a scale and then taking it's relative scale and playing the same degrees together (tonic with tonic, mediant with mediant, etc.) That way, all the intervals are major and minor 3rds.

8. If, say you use the C minor, then would you still do everything to same? Like harmonize it, or would you harmonize the C major scale? With C minor, you would use it's relative major scale to harmonize, which would be Eb Major.

9. Are the I, IV, and V always major chords in all scales, and the ii, iii, and VI, always minors, no matter what scale or type of scale? And if the seventh is always diminsihed, where does the augmented come in? Depends on the scale.

10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar? You can omit certain notes, like the 5th degree, sometimes the root, depends on the situation, really.
Last edited by one vision at Aug 22, 2008,
#4
2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords?
no, there are also sutained chords, i think

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. )

open chords and barre chords usual contain the same notes, some in different octaves though. as for their formulas:
major: 1 3 5
minor: 1 3b (flat) 5
maj7: 1 3 5 7
dom 7: 1 3 5 7b
min7: 1 3b 5 7b
thats all the basic ones

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better?

arpeggios only contain most (if not all) notes in their corresponding chords. The reason it's shaped differently is that some notes in the chord are a some times a different octave than the corresponding notes in the arpeggio.

7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types?

yes for power chords, other chord types, it depends if its in key with the scale

10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar?

play only the root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 13th

sorry i didn't answer all of your questions, i didn't know all of them.
Last edited by jmo74 at Aug 22, 2008,
#6
1. When dealing with intervals, do you add them from the root note or the previously added note?
Usually root.

2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords?
well, if we dont get into all the 6chords, 7chords, suspendedchords, slashchords, raised tone chords, then yes.
(sorry for the sarcasm)

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. )
same notes, just arranged differently.

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better?
Arpeggios normally include differnt tones, like 4ths, 9's 13s, **** like that, and there are many shapes.

5. If you were to write a riff with the same intervals as say... the intro to "Stairway to Heaven," then would your riff sound like "Stairway" in a different key, or would it just have that sort of feel?
if it was the same riff and arpeggiation as stairway, then yes. it would be stairway in a different k.

6. Say you play an open E string, then play on fret 13 of that same string? I know it's a compound interval, but what would I call it?

that would be a b9
7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types?

yes, cause power chords are neither major nor minor, but they only really work over those two, and they DO NOT work over dim chords or aug chords.

8. If, say you use the C minor, then would you still do everything to same? Like harmonize it, or would you harmonize the C major scale?
no, you would use C minor?
9. Are the I, IV, and V always major chords in all scales, and the ii, iii, and VI, always minors, no matter what scale or type of scale? And if the seventh is always diminsihed, where does the augmented come in?
in a major scale, yes. augs would come in with differnt scales
10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar?
an 11th chord doesnt need the 9, (or the root and 5, for that matter. this will confuse you, disregard FOR NOW) and so on.
#7
Quote by Gizmo Factory
Alright, I recently read through "The Crusade," and am now reading through "Music Theory for Dummies."

Through the crusade I came across many questions that I figured I'd better just ask for the sake of the knowledge. And I have some questions that I've gotten out of "Music Theory for Dummies," as well.

IF you could just copy the list of questions below adn then answer them like taking a survey sort of, I would appreciate it very much.

1. When dealing with intervals, do you add them from the root note or the previously added note?Depends on the context. For example, if you see something like "1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7", all of those intervals are shown in relation to the root of the scale. If you're building a chord, though, sometimes the easier approach is the previous note, enabling you to stack thirds easily.

2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords?Nope, there are (in addition to all the extensions) suspended, dominant, half-diminished seventh, Neapolitan and I'm sure a few others that I'm forgetting.

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. )Because the open position chords are able to utilize open strings, you have a lot of repeated notes, but as long as you have the three notes in the triad you're fine.

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better?I'm not sure what you mean TBH. An arpeggio is just a broken chord, so the shape would naturally be the same as the chord of the same name.

5. If you were to write a riff with the same intervals as say... the intro to "Stairway to Heaven," then would your riff sound like "Stairway" in a different key, or would it just have that sort of feel?It wouldn't necessarily go either way. There are a million variables such as dynamics, rhythm, accents, etc. that could make it sound any number of ways.

6. Say you play an open E string, then play on fret 13 of that same string? I know it's a compound interval, but what would I call it?A compound minor second, or a minor ninth.

7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types?Could you elaborate on this? I'm not quite sure what you want to know.

8. If, say you use the C minor, then would you still do everything to same? Like harmonize it, or would you harmonize the C major scale?Again, I'm not quite sure what you're asking, sorry.

9. Are the I, IV, and V always major chords in all scales, and the ii, iii, and VI, always minors, no matter what scale or type of scale? And if the seventh is always diminsihed, where does the augmented come in?Those are just the formulas for the major scale, other scales have different formulae.

10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar?You take the most important harmonic tones of a thirteenth chord and play them; the basic intervals you need for a thirteenth chord (which comes up frequently in jazz) are 1 3 7 13, adding whatever else you see fit.

Hope this helps somewhat.
#8
Quote by Gizmo Factory
1. When dealing with intervals, do you add them from the root note or the previously added note? Most often the root. A flat nine will always be called a flat nine because of it's 13 semitone distance from the root note. However you need to be aware of how the intervals between other notes within a chord will contribute to the final effect.


2. Are major, minor, augmented and diminished the only categories for chords?For triads yes. Most embellishments are extensions alterations or suspensions of one of these categories.

3. Why are the open poition chords so much different from triads, and other than their sound, how do we come up with their formulas? ( I.e. the A major is like... A E A C E or something like that. )Because of the way the guitar is tuned and because guitarists like to play loud we will find the lowest root note and then add as many notes from the triad as we can conveniently finger so that we use as many strings as possible getting the most volume. These are still triads but they are different voicings for the triads. By the way A major is A E A C# E. This example is an open voicing of the A major triad since the third C# is more than one octave above the bass A. The root and fifth are doubled. Different voicings will sound slightly different than each other. For example playing a G major as 320003 (GBDGBG) will sound slightly different than 320033 (GBDGDG) which is still G major. The difference is one voicing doubles the third (B) and the other doubles the fifth (D). The result is both G major but will sound slightly different. This different is very subtle but can be accentuated in arpeggiated forms, in fingerpicking, or through melodic reinforcement.

4. WHy are arpeggios shapes so different from triads and typical chord shapes? And how do I create arpreggio shapes better?How are they different I don't see that but if you explain further how you see them as different it might be easier to respond. As far as arpeggios go they are important tools for the guitarist and you should try to find some arpeggio exercises as soon as possible and start playing through them.

5. If you were to write a riff with the same intervals as say... the intro to "Stairway to Heaven," then would your riff sound like "Stairway" in a different key, or would it just have that sort of feel?Same song different key

6. Say you play an open E string, then play on fret 13 of that same string? I know it's a compound interval, but what would I call it?b9, or minor 9th

7. If you're harmonizing a scale, can you subsititue power chords or for triads? Or other chord types?Yes. So long as you stay in the diatonic scale. But of course it will have a different effect.

8. If, say you use the C minor, then would you still do everything to same? Like harmonize it, or would you harmonize the C major scale?You would harmonize it in the same way as you learnt how to harmonize C major. The harmonized chords will be different than the C major since they C minor contains different intervals and different notes.

9. Are the I, IV, and V always major chords in all scales, and the ii, iii, and VI, always minors, no matter what scale or type of scale? And if the seventh is always diminsihed, where does the augmented come in?No. I IV V are always major in the Major Scale in any key. However other scale types will use different intervals and different notes than the major scale so the I IV and V will be have different qualities depending on what the intervals are. For example in the A minor scale the tonic (i) is Am; the subdominant(iv) is Dm(iv); and the dominant is Em(v). The III VI and VII are all major in quality in a minor key and the ii is diminished.

10. If you a 7th chord has four notes, and a 9th has five and an 11th has 6, then how can you play a 13th chords on a six string guitar?As you add extensions you can start leaving other less important notes out. In a 13th for example you can leave out the 11 or the 9 but you would not leave out the 7.
hope that helps
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Aug 23, 2008,