#1
Sorry for the NEWBIE question, but I was looking up the tab for Lucid Dreams by Franz Ferdinand and I can't seem to figure out some chords. Here is the tab: http://ultimate-guitar.com/print.php?what=tab&id=718251

First, what is C#m/A? Next, what is C#m/A#?

I know it has something to do with like the root notes of one of the chords, but I forgot. And also I can't seem to find them on a Chord Finder site. Thanks so much for your help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
#2
The slash chords indicate that the lowest note played is not the root note. For example, in a C#m/A, the lowest note is A and not C#. From bottom to top, the notes of a C#m/A would be A, C#, E and G#. The C#m/A# is the same idea, so I'm sure you can figure that one out.
#3
the slash isnt needed. basically, all it tells you is that that note is replacing the bass note of whatever chord it is, in this case C#m. in this case, you dont even need to play the chord when you play the A#, its just a bass note. play it seperately while switching to the F#.
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#4
Quote by TK1
the slash isnt needed. basically, all it tells you is that that note is replacing the bass note of whatever chord it is, in this case C#m. in this case, you dont even need to play the chord when you play the A#, its just a bass note. play it seperately while switching to the F#.

The slash is needed, otherwise it'd just be a C#m without an A or A# root and would sound different.
#5
Quote by TK1
the slash isnt needed. basically, all it tells you is that that note is replacing the bass note of whatever chord it is, in this case C#m. in this case, you dont even need to play the chord when you play the A#, its just a bass note. play it seperately while switching to the F#.



it's needed it is notating an inversion of the chord
#6
Quote by lbc_sublime
it's needed it is notating an inversion of the chord

Not necessarily an inversion, just a bass note that doesn't happen to be the root. A lot of the time, though, you're right; many slash chords are inversions.
#7
So, would it look like this:

----------4-----------
----------4-----------
----------6-----------
----------6-----------
----------4-----------
----------5-----------
#8
Almost, it would be (for C#m/A):


e-4-
B-5-
G-6-
D-6-
A-4-
E-5-


The chord you notated would be C#sus2/A.

Also, keep in mind that this is just one voicing; there are many ways to play these chords.
Last edited by :-D at Aug 23, 2008,
#10
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#11
Everyone posting above is right, in a way. its not entirely needed though, IMO. For instance, if you saw that chord in a jazz chart, the bass player would almost always catch that note, but in a rock setting, the bass player might stil catch it, but i would put it in, while in a jazz chart i would put it in the bass part, and not the guitar part.
#12
Quote by KiErAn123
Everyone posting above is right, in a way. its not entirely needed though, IMO. For instance, if you saw that chord in a jazz chart, the bass player would almost always catch that note, but in a rock setting, the bass player might stil catch it, but i would put it in, while in a jazz chart i would put it in the bass part, and not the guitar part.

Agreed. Jazz comping + minimalism = excellence.