#1
I need help using modes. I want to start using modes in my band, which is a trio. If there is no one playing chords behind what i'm playing, how will i be able to make C Ionian sound different from E Phrygian? Basically, I'm asking how to make modes with the same notes sound different without using chords.
#2
It's extremely complicated, depending on the mode. Dorian, in my opinion, is the easiest mode to play without a backing harmony. Just create chords based on the modes. For major modes, an I - V vamp is common. My favorite one for phrygian is im7 - iiMaj7.
#3
Quote by ledzeppelin535
I need help using modes. I want to start using modes in my band, which is a trio. If there is no one playing chords behind what i'm playing, how will i be able to make C Ionian sound different from E Phrygian? Basically, I'm asking how to make modes with the same notes sound different without using chords.


Emphasize the notes that define the mode. Its pretty easy, just practice.

So for phrygian you would emphasize the resolution of the b2 to the 1, and the b6 to the 5. You also could make it phrygian dominant which would be really easy.
#4
Quote by ouchies
Emphasize the notes that define the mode. Its pretty easy, just practice.

So for phrygian you would emphasize the resolution of the b2 to the 1, and the b6 to the 5. You also could make it phrygian dominant which would be really easy.



Lets say i'm using the mixolydian mode. Would i just use the b7 in important parts of riffs/solos?
#5
Play E minor with a flat 2nd and you will most likely be playing in E Phrygian. What will determine your mode is your phrasing and the development of melodic ideas. If you use your melody to outline chord progressions it will begin to imply a specific mode.

The most important thing is to establish the E as the final (the final is the tonic in modal speak).

It will be the note that resolves the melody in specific places throughout.
Si
#6
resolve to the root note of the mode, say if you are playing C Ionian, play your melodies and make your last note an E (E Phrygian). thats the simple way to do it.
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along with fire escape routes...

#7
Quote by aradine
resolve to the root note of the mode, say if you are playing C Ionian, play your melodies and make your last note an E (E Phrygian). thats the simple way to do it.


No. The order of the notes is irrelevant. The harmony determines the mode.
If you are playing the notes CDEFGAB over a C major progression, you are playing C major. If you want to play E phrygian, you need an E minor progression with a flattened second. Since modal harmony is non-functional, this is best done with a one or two chord vamp.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
No. The order of the notes is irrelevant. The harmony determines the mode.
If you are playing the notes CDEFGAB over a C major progression, you are playing C major. If you want to play E phrygian, you need an E minor progression with a flattened second. Since modal harmony is non-functional, this is best done with a one or two chord vamp.
They're a trio. There'll be no chord-like harmony. As a guess, the T/Ss band is one percussionist, one bassist and one melody instrument (guitar most likely, but could be sax or trumpet or violin or whatever).

Anyway, your best bet is to keep your note choice simple. Resolving to a specific note isnt necessary, as you wouldnt wan every single one of your phrases resolving.

The best advice I can give you is to play pentatonics and just add the modal note to your riffs every so often. Keep it simple. So if your playing in dorian, play pentatonics and just add that M6 in to add some spice.

Keep your bassist playing something simpler. As in chord tones, as if he/she is outlining a chord.

And keep to a beat. It will all fall apart if you dont keep to a beat.
#9
Quote by ledzeppelin535
I need help using modes. I want to start using modes in my band, which is a trio. If there is no one playing chords behind what i'm playing, how will i be able to make C Ionian sound different from E Phrygian? Basically, I'm asking how to make modes with the same notes sound different without using chords.



rather than "using modes" for the sake of "using modes". Why not take the time to learn what they are, what they sound like, and how to apply them. (you wont learn that in 1 post on an internet forum).

Modes, like any scale offer colors that we as artists may want to use to achieve our goals. Too often people get into modes for superficial reasons. "check me out dude I know modes.... you know those scales with really big impressive names...... that means I know my stuff dude, check me out". In other words its a status thing: " I know modes therefore I've achieved a certain level of musicianship".

If your getting into modes for that reason...... Don't. Use them because you know what they are and because they give you the sound you want/need/hear. If you're not there yet, do some studying and come back to it later on. Not so you can say you use modes..... but because they are the right choice sonically for your music.

In the meantime, there is alot you could do with the standard Major/minor and pentatonic scales if you put your ears/brains & fingers to it. Spend some time there and build yourself a foundation with which to understand modes and other musical concepts.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 23, 2008,
#10
assuming you have a bassist use you bass as the static harmony and then modes

the bass can be used to define the key i was watchingthis good jazz lessons where this guy vic juris does it and there is only a bass and a guitar.

i assume tyhere is a guitar bass and drummer
#11
Quote by aradine
resolve to the root note of the mode, say if you are playing C Ionian, play your melodies and make your last note an E (E Phrygian). thats the simple way to do it.

This doesn't really work. It has to actually resolve. If you're playing in C Ionian, it would take a drastic (for lack of a better word) change in harmony to imply a modal change to E Phrygian. Think of it as a key change, even though it isn't. But if you don't understand modes completely, then read up some more on them. Modes are more than just scales starting on a different note. I hope that didn't sound too cocky.
#13
Can someone give me a guitarist that uses modes effectively without having a harmony/chords behind what he plays?
#15
Quote by ledzeppelin535
Can someone give me a guitarist that uses modes effectively without having a harmony/chords behind what he plays?



what is your band a singer guitarist and drummer? is there a bass?
#16
Quote by lbc_sublime
what is your band a singer guitarist and drummer? is there a bass?



It's a bassist, guitarist, and a drummer. I'm also the singer at the moment.
#17
Quote by ledzeppelin535
Can someone give me a guitarist that uses modes effectively without having a harmony/chords behind what he plays?



Steve Vai