#1
I had been playing by ear and through experimentation till now but I finally decided to learn scales to help me with my playing. I learnt A minor pentatonic scale across the fretboard but then I realized I just couldn't do it easily in all the keys. Learning a scale in another key is like learning a new scale altogether for me and it becomes really frustrating. Any advice pls?
#2
I was gonna ask the same thing, but I think the case with pentatonics (1st position at least) can be moved anywhere on the fretboard. I'm not so sure about the other positions of the scale
#3
It's EXACTLY the same pattern, it just transposes so to play in B you just shift all the A notes to B's - do you know all the notes on the fretboard?
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Earlier, I visited a site for scales, and i noticed that there were 5 different positions for the minor harmonic scale, one for each key, could you please explain this?
#5
Quote by Deemer
Earlier, I visited a site for scales, and i noticed that there were 5 different positions for the minor harmonic scale, one for each key, could you please explain this?

A typical scale contains 7 notes...that's all. That's what a scale is, a pattern of notes with set intervals over a single octave.

Those notes will appear in multiple places, the scale patterns are just all the places the notes of a particular scale occur on the fretboard...but there's only 7 actual distinct notes in there.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Is this true for the harmonic minor scale and others as well? Like if I know the pattern of the G harmonic minor scale, is it the same pattern for A, except I start on an A root note?
#7
Quote by drewfromutah
Is this true for the harmonic minor scale and others as well? Like if I know the pattern of the G harmonic minor scale, is it the same pattern for A, except I start on an A root note?


Yes, it is. What helps me is to visualise the patterns on the fretboard. Also learning to sing the scales help because that you'll be able to figure out the steps by ear.
#8
Learning the notes on the fretboard and the notes and intervals a scale contains is the most helpful thing you can do.

You learn very little from patterns alone.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Quote by steven seagull
A typical scale contains 7 notes...that's all. That's what a scale is, a pattern of notes with set intervals over a single octave.

Those notes will appear in multiple places, the scale patterns are just all the places the notes of a particular scale occur on the fretboard...but there's only 7 actual distinct notes in there.

+1 I stopped thinking of shapes and started thinking of notes. Ive been messing around with scales by putting a scale chart which includes every note of the scale on a fretboard infront of me and playing around with it over a little progression that would work with it. IF you change the key of E to Key of F the notes in hte given scale are changed all up one half step.

Use the site I linked below to show every note of your scale in the key of E and then the key of F and see what happens.

Your getting confused because your thinking of it as shapes or patterns instead notes that lie over the whole fretboard. When i started thinking about the whole fretboard instead of boxes or shapes it really opened me up and got me grabbing higher or lower that I wouldn't have previously and sliding and bending way better because i know more target notes in the key. I was thinking in terms of shapes only a few months ago and since i started looking at full scale charts that say the actual notes names instead of patterns in one place ive seen huge improvments in my improvising and feel much more expresive with my phrasings.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php This site has a thing that will make full scale charts for you and you can also do it in guitar pro.
Last edited by /-\liceNChains at Aug 23, 2008,