#1
I'm trying to learn the guitar, and learn as much theory, notes, chords, scales, etc. that I possibly can. I'm trying to do it so I can do more than just read tabs.

Having said that, I have a Jackson SL1 soloist, with a Floyd Rose. I just got the thing today, and it's all out of tune. So I have to re-tune it, but I have to decide if I should go standard of do a half-step lower.

Many players (hendrix, SRV, van halen) dropped to this tuning, and many of the metal songs I like (some from megadeth, metallica, etc.) are all in E flat tuning as well.

But the idea here is to get good at guitar and Music theory, so would it be wise to use an un-standard tuning if I'm trying to hear what certain notes are supposed to sound like?

For example, learning on the standard E tuning will let me know where each and every note is on the guitar, so I can use my theory to improv. or whatever. If I drop tune, it will throw everything off and I'll have to learn each note one half-step lower.

Am I just going mad?
#2
I would go for E standard to start with. Just worry about learning first then go for different tunings if you want to. Find your own style first then jump to a Metallica style or whatever
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#4
well if you go about learning the notes on a guitar, once you ACTUALLY learn the notes, its easier to look at it and see what notes are where in relation to your tuning. really the tuning that you use is pretty irrelevent, i'd say maybe E flat since it makes it a little easier to press the strings down.
#5
It won't affect anything sonically. If you know the notes of the guitar, then it shouldn't even be that big of an issue (It isn't for me) in terms of reposition chords and the like. It may take a little getting used to, but it's not that difficult when you get it. Hang in there man, you'll get it.
#6
Quote by z4twenny
well if you go about learning the notes on a guitar, once you ACTUALLY learn the notes, its easier to look at it and see what notes are where in relation to your tuning. really the tuning that you use is pretty irrelevent, i'd say maybe E flat since it makes it a little easier to press the strings down.

this
#7
If you memorize all the scales and patterns, it doesn't matter what tuning you play in, unless its Drop D, C, etc. The notes will just be a half step lower. You can play songs that are originally E standard in Eb too. The only difference is if you try to play along.
You could always tune to Eb and put a capo on the first fret when you want to play a song in E standard.
#9
Here's the question though... when bands tune down a half step, do they still imagine playing the same notes, or do they shift their playing?

For example, if I'm used to standard E tuning and I'm going through jazz progressions, if I tune down to E flat it will really be all a half step lower. Is it right to think of it this way, that it's lowered a half step, or do I continue to tell myself that I'm still playing the same notes on the same frets as I would in E tuning? It would just sound different.

It's very difficult for me to explain this. I think I'm making too big of a deal.
#11
Quote by gardon
Here's the question though... when bands tune down a half step, do they still imagine playing the same notes, or do they shift their playing?

For example, if I'm used to standard E tuning and I'm going through jazz progressions, if I tune down to E flat it will really be all a half step lower. Is it right to think of it this way, that it's lowered a half step, or do I continue to tell myself that I'm still playing the same notes on the same frets as I would in E tuning? It would just sound different.

It's very difficult for me to explain this. I think I'm making too big of a deal.
If the song is in F and your guitar is tuned to Eb standard, you would imagine playing in Gb.
#12
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
It won't affect anything sonically.


Wrong. Different string tensions give different tones.