#1
How does it work. I think I understand that it involves replacing the 5 chord with an m2 chord?

I dont know, but keep the answers as quick and to the point as you can. I already know all the stuff like how intervals work etc etc. So basically if it takes more then 2 paragraphs to explain its to long.
#2
The short answer is that if you have dominant-tonic movement (V-I), you can substitute chords a tritone away from the original dominant chord. If you had a progression such as Em7-A7-Dmaj7, you could play Em7-Eb7-Dmaj7.

Did you want anything more involved than that?
#3
Quote by :-D
The short answer is that if you have dominant-tonic movement (V-I), you can substitute chords a tritone away from the original dominant chord. If you had a progression such as Em7-A7-Dmaj7, you could play Em7-Eb7-Dmaj7.

Did you want anything more involved than that?


Nope, that was perfect.

Sorry if I was blunt, but I hate asking these questions and then people give me a wall of text and i spend 20 minutes searching for a real answer in their post.
#4
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Nope, that was perfect.

Sorry if I was blunt, but I hate asking these questions and then people give me a wall of text and i spend 20 minutes searching for a real answer in their post.

Fully understood; if you want any more information on the tritone subs just let me know.
#5
Quote by :-D
Fully understood; if you want any more information on the tritone subs just let me know.


Now that I think about it, whats a simple way to put them in walking lines. Just play the notes in the tritone sub over the 5 chord? Will it sound like **** if everyones playing the 5?
#6
Simple point is is that the interval that defines the 7 chords is the 3 to the 7, in a dom seven that would be the b5, which gives it its sound.

So, in the key of C, to use your example, we have G7

G B D F

and Bdim7

B D F A

The two notes that are the ssame are the B-F realtionship (b5).

But this doesnt stop at tritones, my friend.

Lets look at Cmaj7

C E G B

and Am7

A C E G

see it yet?

so the point is this:

You can take any 7th chord, take the 3rd and the 7th, and many other chords with those two notes become possibilities as voicings.

Hope it helped.
#7
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Now that I think about it, whats a simple way to put them in walking lines. Just play the notes in the tritone sub over the 5 chord? Will it sound like **** if everyones playing the 5?

Well, naturally it's going to sound a little wonky if you do something like that. What I forgot to mention is that for the tritone sub to work as a tritone sub and not an entire reharmonization, the bass should still play the original root note of the chord. In my example with the A7, you'd effectively be playing an Eb7/A, which serves to create an altered chord (A7b5b9). Because of this, the tritone sub is used for harmonic purposes, so you wouldn't really be able to pull out a single note tritone substitution if you're playing over a harmonic backing that won't support it.

Did that make any sense?

A lot of the "allure", if you will, of tritone subs is the chromatic bass movement and the smooth upper voice leading, so using it melodically as opposed to harmonically will not work as well.
Last edited by :-D at Aug 23, 2008,
#8
Quote by :-D
Well, naturally it's going to sound a little wonky if you do something like that. What I forgot to mention is that for the tritone sub to work as a tritone sub and not an entire reharmonization, the bass should still play the original root note of the chord. In my example with the A7, you'd effectively be playing an Eb7/A, which serves to create an altered chord (A7b5b9). Because of this, the tritone sub is used for harmonic purposes, so you wouldn't really be able to pull out a single note tritone substitution if you're playing over a harmonic backing that won't support it.

Did that make any sense?


Yea, I got it. So unless the rest of the band is doing the tritone sub, I should stay away?

And if I can do it without to much trouble, should I sub one note on the 5 chord, or should I play all my notes on the 5 chord as notes from the tritone chord.
#9
No, just pick and choose places that sound "safe" to you to start with, and you will start to see shapes openiong up over time, making more sense to you, which leads to more complicated stuff.
#10
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Yea, I got it. So unless the rest of the band is doing the tritone sub, I should stay away?

And if I can do it without to much trouble, should I sub one note on the 5 chord, or should I play all my notes on the 5 chord as notes from the tritone chord.

In general, yes, it's a good idea to use the tritone sub idea in harmonic practice moreso than in single note lines with harmony that may not provide the right context.

It would be a good idea to just approach it as an entirely new chord as opposed to subbing one note; it'll usually create smoother voice leading.
#11
Quote by :-D
In general, yes, it's a good idea to use the tritone sub idea in harmonic practice moreso than in single note lines with harmony that may not provide the right context.

It would be a good idea to just approach it as an entirely new chord as opposed to subbing one note; it'll usually create smoother voice leading.


Excellent.

If I try it I know my band director will be like ZOMG, cause hes a theory monster.