#1
Let's say I want to play something in the key of...oh...I don't know...C. Obviously I can play the notes C,D,E,F,G,A,B, and it would sound alright. But can I start a riff based on the C Major scale, use a few notes out side of that scale, and come back to the C Major scale? Would that riff still be considered in the key of C? Or am I only limited to those seven notes C,D,E,F,G,A, and B?
#2
you can use cromatic tones no problem but with out a progression it may sound different from Cmaj(and probably will be) because there may not be anything pushing the lick to Cmajor.

it will probably be heard as something more of a key change but i am not sure about that. EDIT and i mean i don't know what other notes you are putting in so i don't know how different the "chromatic tones" are going to be and what effect it will have
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Aug 24, 2008,
#3
I think thats called modulation, when you change key during a song, so yes I think you are limited to those 7 notes if you are playing in C.
#4
i think its in the key of C if the chords still are and you use those extra notes as passing tones.

correct me if im wrong
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#6
Quote by Against Him?
u can do w/e the **** you want if it sounds good



I'm going to guess you know nothing about theory.
Just a guess.


No worries, me neither
#7
I know my theory, and Against Him is completely right. Music theory just attempts to explain why music sounds the way it does, it does not tell you what to play. If you play something because it sounds good then you are effectively achieving the goal music theory was designed for without using music theory.
#8
I believe you can break out of the C Major Scale and play other tones, such as C# or Bb, its just a matter of whether it sounds good to you. A chord progression outside of the scale is rare, I think, but it all depends on whether it sounds good.
#9
Quote by aaciseric
I think thats called modulation, when you change key during a song, so yes I think you are limited to those 7 notes if you are playing in C.

This is not true. There are notes out of key in tons of sheet music ive played. You can have out of key notes you are not limited to C D E F G A B. The amount that you can get away with is not set in stone either and would differ depending on many factors.
#10
Quote by identityxcrysis
I'm going to guess you know nothing about theory.
Just a guess.


No worries, me neither


nah i know a lot of about theory, technically the only "right" notes are the ones in that key. if you awnt your song to sound like its in the key of c then you can only play those notes, if you start pulling notes out of the minor key it will change the feeling or even sound wrong over the chord progression, generally if you do that you'll have to use different chords out of the key, but you can play any note you want if it sounds right.

basically each key has like 7 modes right? and each mode has different notes in it so if you want to get really technical about it you can play any note you want and theory will just explain why your **** sounds right by describing the mode you're playing in at any particular moment. so rather then try to learn what are right and wrong notes in any certain instance just use your ear.
#11
^The modes in the key contain all the same notes though so your statement doesnt make much sense if your trying to say the because of the modes you can play any note.
CDEFGAB
DEFGABC
EFGABCD all the same notes....
#12
modes are implied by a progression if you play a scale like D dorian with out a progression it is just considered the enharmonic major scale unless you can keep the tonality by inmplying arps or something similiar
song stuck in my head today


#13
hmmm.... well i was under the impression that as long as you base your riff around what ever key you want to be in, in this case C, you can add a few "extra" notes not found in that scale and it should still sound as if it was in that key. i could be wrong, im still trying to brush up on my theory...i thought id see what you guys have to say about it, thanks for the input
#14
3mil, in very short answer: you are absolutely right.
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