#1
Are amps that are class a/b eg engl screamer, actually both classes, or is it possible to select the class on the amp?!?
#2
No, ab is it's own class. Most guitar amps are class ab. I know some amps you can select if they're class a or class ab but I don't know about that one.
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#4
I'm not sure exactly, but I know class A is for softer music, and AB is for uberly hardcore music.
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#5
Just the way the way the tubes in the poweramps are run. Generally class A is less efficient and not as tight sounding though it tends to produce more harmonics and sound bluesier. Class AB is the most common since you can get more power out of the same tubes. One class isn't better than the other, just different.

Quote by HLrocker
I'm not sure exactly, but I know class A is for softer music, and AB is for uberly hardcore music.


Not necessarily, the circuitry of the amp has a lot more to say about that.
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#6
^ +1
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#7
Bottom line: It doesn't matter. The other circuitry has a much bigger impact than the class.
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#8
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Bottom line: It doesn't matter. The other circuitry has a much bigger impact than the class.

+1
#9
I'll try to make this as simple as possible:

If you look at a series of sound waves, half of everything is above the center line and half of everything is below it. Class A amps use all the power tubes for both halves all the time, because of this you can have a class A amp with only one power tube if you want.

Class A/B amps have to have pairs of tubes, this is because the amp alternates back and forth between them, one tube for the top half and one for the bottom half of each sound wave. You can't cut the inactive tube all the way off though, if you did it would sound choppy as there's no way to ensure that the timing between the crossover is absolutely perfect, this is called crossover distortion (this distortion does NOT sound good). To prevent crossover distortion, class A/B amps are "biased" to adjust the amount of work the inactive tube is doing.

Because you don't have the crossover, a class A amp is generally fuller sounding and more harmonically complex, but since that crossover isn't there to deaden the fullness and the harmonics they can get very muddy very quickly.
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