#1
I was wondering if there is any specific technique to jamming to chords and soloing to them instead of scales. Dont get me wrong, Im a great rhythm guitarist, but Im looking to do something more with my chords.

Take the Intro to Hendrix' Little Wing for example, the entire thing is pretty much based on chords. What is the thought behind this? Scales are nice and all, but Im looking for a little something different. Not looking to do something exactly like it, just looking for the general idea.

Dont know if Ive explained it well, but any help or links to lessons would be greatly appreciated.
#2
Well, firstly this is a theory question, so it's covered by musician talk. I'll move the thread there in a second. If you look at little wing (edg actually made a great post on it), what he's often doing is simply adding little trills based on suspensions of the current chord (the 2nd and 4th above the root) and double stops from different voices, interspersed with little touches of the blues scale.
#3
Well he's still playing scales in that song, but he's playing scale notes that are close to the chord grip. Music is all about scales, you just need to apply them so they sound like music and not just scalar patterns.
#4
So, basically, hes keeping within the notes of the key and changing the voicings? Then the double stops would have the 7ths notes or whatever else to change the voicings, while inbetween chords the blues scale is used for the little mini fills? Would that be about right? I think this is something called Melodic Control would that be correct? Which of your lessons would cover this?

Thanks for the help I appreciate it.
#5
^ you've got the right kind of idea, but not exactly. I suggest you play about with it for about an hour and then you'll have it.

Melodic Control is title of an excellent instructional vid, and it has sections applying directly to this style of playing.

None of my lessons really cover this directly, if you can play chords.
#6
Quote by beavers333
I was wondering if there is any specific technique to jamming to chords and soloing to them instead of scales. Dont get me wrong, Im a great rhythm guitarist, but Im looking to do something more with my chords.

Take the Intro to Hendrix' Little Wing for example, the entire thing is pretty much based on chords. What is the thought behind this? Scales are nice and all, but Im looking for a little something different. Not looking to do something exactly like it, just looking for the general idea.

Dont know if Ive explained it well, but any help or links to lessons would be greatly appreciated.

When it all boils down to it chords and scales are the same thing, just arranged differently....kind of like Mexican food.

It's all about intervals and how notes work with each other, whether you play them sequentially or simultaneously is purely a matter of choice.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Thanks Freepower and Steven Seagull.

Freepower - Is the video youre talking about by Marty Friedman or Scott Henderson? I have both but have yet to give either a good go, which I will end up doing soon.

Steven Seagull - When you talk about sequentially vs simultaneously are you talking about like an arpeggio vs a strum?
#8
Quote by beavers333
Thanks Freepower and Steven Seagull.

Freepower - Is the video youre talking about by Marty Friedman or Scott Henderson? I have both but have yet to give either a good go, which I will end up doing soon.

Steven Seagull - When you talk about sequentially vs simultaneously are you talking about like an arpeggio vs a strum?

Not even going into that level of detail to be honest, I'm purely talking about the sounds you're using...if you take a bunch of notes and play them one after the other it's a scale, play them together it's a chord, that's the only difference. Arpeggiating vs strumming is just technique, you need to separate technique from theory in your mind.
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#9
Understood, thank you. And I guess choosing which notes to use and when is where the actual theory comes into play.
#10
Pretty much, ideally it should always be "what sound do I want here", followed by "what do I need to do to get that sound"
Actually called Mark!

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#11
Quote by Freepower
Well, firstly this is a theory question, so it's covered by musician talk. I'll move the thread there in a second. If you look at little wing (edg actually made a great post on it),


I did? I don't remember

Yeah, the intro to little wing is basically just chord fragments. There's "filler" notes
and passing tones from the scale. What scale? Well, it's in Em. Pretty much
everything he uses is from Em. The intro relies heavily on the chords and
secondarily on the scale. The solo is somewhat reversed. He mostly uses Em
pentatonic. But he still heavily emphasized the chord tones particularly in the last
few chords of the verse (G - F - C - D).
#13
Get The Hendrix Signature Licks book by Alendort. It's got Little Wing and many
others. Learn by imitating. Work out the rhythm exactly as notated to a
metronome. That's the best part about those books. The rhythm is noted by
someone with a good ear and it really can be the hardest part to work out, but
it's well worth the effort.
#14
Thanks edg, learning by imitation is always good. Any other tips still appreciated.