#1
Ive really been trying to learn the notes of the fretboard better in the last couple of days, and Ive done the whole fretboard master thing. The problem with it is, is that its on the computer. Its not going into your muscle memory, therefore, its not as easy to apply, rather then learning them through the guitar.

The method Ive sorta come up with (and I doubt someone hasnt come up with it here before, but just didnt see it) is to just practice the C Major scale in all modes. Ive been sorta sticking with one area until I know it very well. For example, at the moment Im working on the Ionion, or the basic major scale, starting at the lowest string on the eighth fret. Now, instead of going through it quickly, Im doing it nice and easy, and saying aloud every note that Im on. This is helping with scales and memory, and saying them outloud always seems to help cement it into the brain better. The reason I chose the C Major scale, is once you know all the non flat/sharp notes up and down the neck, they are only a half step away of the notes you already know.

Works a lot better than these computer programs in my opinion.
#2
i think this is well known as a decent idea, at least it seems common sense to me anyways.
Quote by Martyr's Prayer
I got crap to do, okay? Counter-Strike isn't going to play itself.
#4
Quote by beavers333
Ive really been trying to learn the notes of the fretboard better in the last couple of days, and Ive done the whole fretboard master thing. The problem with it is, is that its on the computer. Its not going into your muscle memory, therefore, its not as easy to apply, rather then learning them through the guitar.

The method Ive sorta come up with (and I doubt someone hasnt come up with it here before, but just didnt see it) is to just practice the C Major scale in all modes. Ive been sorta sticking with one area until I know it very well. For example, at the moment Im working on the Ionion, or the basic major scale, starting at the lowest string on the eighth fret. Now, instead of going through it quickly, Im doing it nice and easy, and saying aloud every note that Im on. This is helping with scales and memory, and saying them outloud always seems to help cement it into the brain better. The reason I chose the C Major scale, is once you know all the non flat/sharp notes up and down the neck, they are only a half step away of the notes you already know.

Works a lot better than these computer programs in my opinion.

There's little point bringing modes into things until you're in a position to use them properly, they just confuse matters...and there's no way you can understand them until you know the notes.

Best thing to do is learn the notes themselves first, not in the context of scales or patterns.

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
One way to do it is...

Say out loud the names of the notes you are playing, whilst you're playing ordinary licks. Obviously, start slow...This way it make learning it more fun, a you can still play cool licks!
Quote by PapaSchumpf
it has to be good. jonas brothers play the bigger version of it


Member of Les Paul Liberators...Click here if you have a Les Paul
Rate my songs... Here
#6
The seagull does it again... Personally, I don't learn every note on there, but reference points so I'm never more than a couple of frets from a note I know. And if y'all can't move up/down a chromatic scale quickish, you need to learn to do so.
#7
I updated a lesson series on my site that might be helpful.

Learning Note Names on the E String
Naming Chromatic Notes

Another great note-naming exercise is simply to choose a note, say G. Start on the 6th string, find it (3rd fret), then move to string 5, find it (10th fret) and so on. Patterns to be learned by doing that.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~ Storm Stenvold
~ http://www.guitarteacher.com
~ See It, Hear It, Play It!
~ Free Video Guitar Lessons, Jam Tracks + More!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#8
Quote by firstnamestorm
...Another great note-naming exercise is simply to choose a note, say G. Start on the 6th string, find it (3rd fret), then move to string 5, find it (10th fret) and so on. Patterns to be learned by doing that.


This is essentially the method I'm using to start learning the fret board.

I have started with C.

I have a Metronome on about 30 - 40 BPM and play the C note on each string (no opens) from low to high then back down again. Each time I go up and back down flawlessly 5 times I increase the BPM by 10 and go again. speeding up like that keeps it fun and challenging. (my current record is 100 BPM).

Once I've got C down perfectly and I can instantly go to the C note on any string I plan to move on to G, then D, then so on.