#1
my 9 year old brother wants to start learning guitar , but my parents cant afford lessons right now , for me or for him , so i am the only one able to teach him. I have been playing for 8 months , and i am mostly self taught. I would like to know what i should teach him . It would be very kind if someone wrote a short list for the order i should teach him stuff. I dont want to overwhelm him , but i dont want to bore him either. i want him to really have fun doing it, and i know if i fail now , it will really damage his motivation and love for the guitar.An example of the list , would be to show , some good riffs , chords,songs ,techniques and what order he should learn them . An example would be should i teach him legato techniques before chords etc.thank you for your help =]
#2
start by teaching him the basic chords, then teach him alternate picking and make him practice barrel chords and major and minor scales.. best way to start imho
#4
Teach him a few chords first, especially open chords. Then teach him a chord progression to a song he likes, then if the song calls for it teach him the riffs from that. Then teach him about power chords, hammer ons and pull offs, and slides.

Basically you just wanna get him from the very basic things to more complex things, but introduce him things in the form of things he recognizes, like songs he likes, etc.
#5
shouldnt i first teach himm some simple one string riffs first instead of chords, so he gets the hang how how to play notes invidually , and then he will have an easier time with chords?
#6
Ask him what kind of stuff he wants to play. There's no point putting theory on his back if he doesn't want to. You could see if theres anything special he likes to listen to, and you can take it from there.
You could teach him how to play a basic one-note-at-a-time melody, and if he ever wants to play songs or stuff with chords in it, teach him the basic ones and perhaps give him a list of a few further ones, so he can learn them if he wants to, or needs to.

You could of course also teach him to read tabs, so he can work in his own pace as well, learning what he wants to learn. Especially in that age, I think playing the guitar should be more about fun than theory etc (unless he finds that fun).
#7
Quote by sollesnes
Ask him what kind of stuff he wants to play. There's no point putting theory on his back if he doesn't want to. You could see if theres anything special he likes to listen to, and you can take it from there.
You could teach him how to play a basic one-note-at-a-time melody, and if he ever wants to play songs or stuff with chords in it, teach him the basic ones and perhaps give him a list of a few further ones, so he can learn them if he wants to, or needs to.

You could of course also teach him to read tabs, so he can work in his own pace as well, learning what he wants to learn. Especially in that age, I think playing the guitar should be more about fun than theory etc (unless he finds that fun).


+1. I think he'll enjoy playing songs he knows than learning about musical theory. I mean, he's 9. Music theory is still important, but I just think that at 9 he might quickly lose interest.
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.
#9
Quote by flyingE27
shouldnt i first teach himm some simple one string riffs first instead of chords, so he gets the hang how how to play notes invidually , and then he will have an easier time with chords?


I think you should teach him chords first. I mean open chords. And then advance to barre chords. And then start teaching him simple licks.
Theory can be a little inconvenient for a 9 year old.
#10
I disagree with telling him to start on chords. It sounds good in theory but its very difficult. I tried showing my 8 year old nephew chords. He loves to mess around on his acoustic but he hard to teach. Im not gonna push it and ruin his fun. Its hard enough getting him to play single notes and understand how to read a tab. I agree with what sollesness said. It has to be fun. Think about it at 8 or 9 years old your attention span is **** then you have video games and little buddys from school and ****. Just be glad he even has an interest in the guitar and try to nuture that interest. If he can do chords then try it but if hes really having a hard time show him some single note melodys that are familiar. If you push a little guy to hard he may just say **** this and play guitar hero. Just make it as enjoyable and as fun as possible and sneak in all the knowlage you can untill hes ready.
#12
Quote by estranged_g_n_r
+1. I think he'll enjoy playing songs he knows than learning about musical theory. I mean, he's 9. Music theory is still important, but I just think that at 9 he might quickly lose interest.

Exactly. After he progresses a little bit and gets older, you can introduce him to beginner's theory by showing him what's going on in the songs he likes and is already playing. He'll be progressing and playing and still retaining interest while learning theory.
#13
Really the best way is to get some of the music he likes get some tabs or whatever and have him learn the songs in a one string basis. The first thing you want him to get used to is fretting strings, help him get his fingers hardened, and it will help him get quicker. Also i know it sounds kinda lame, but get him to play guitar hero, i played guitar hero a while after i learned guitar, and then after i played guitar hero and got to the expert level i realized that my speed greatly improved on my guitar. And after he gets used to just fretting and moving his hands then you can start with chords and power chords. And don't introduce the idea of musical theory like all the complicated stuff too early, i know i tried that too early and it just confused the hell outta me. Good luck and just remember to be a strict but relaxed teacher.
#14
Imo, the best way for anyone with a short attention span to learn to play guitar is this.

Learn songs, and point out what chords are what in the songs.

when I started out my friend taught me how to play.

he taught me chords in open position, and power chords

then he taught me two songs from my favourite band (Nirvana)

he taught me Come As You Are, has simple picking, and then simple power chords, and a simple solo.

Make sure you teach your brother atleast 1 solo (a very easy one) learning your first solo even if it is ridiculously easy, it still feels REALLY ****ing awesome, and encouraging.

My friend then taught me Heart Shaped Box.

If by some chance your brother likes Nirvana, this is an AMAZING song to teach him, and any other beginner.

The song has broken chords, slides, picking notes, and you get to strum chords out too, and the solo is easy, but may be challenging for a beginner.

then whatever these songs leave out (such as palm muting, hammer ons / pull-offs) you can teach them to him.

Now if he doesn't like Nirvana, tell him to start, or try and find songs by other bands that he likes that go over a bunch of these techniques.

If I was you I wouldn't start him off with scales right now....teach him the basics, then when he's got that all down, you can teach him some basic theory.

hope this helped, feel free to PM me any quuestions
#16
but get him to play guitar hero,
Noooooo! Thats the worst thing you can do for a 9 year old. Instant rewards > Work in a 9 year olds world. You fail. Never incourage children to play video games they will do that plenty even with you trying your hardest to get them away from them.
#17
but get him to play guitar hero,

Noooooo! Thats the worst thing you can do for a 9 year old. Instant rewards > Work in a 9 year olds world. You fail. Never incourage children to play video games they will do that plenty even with you trying your hardest to get them away from them.


my first guitar, a super cheap 80 one with super tiny frets and neck, I played it for like one week and dropped it and never played it in a whole year, then i started playing guitar hero since I got it last christmas, after 5 starring expert songs (hopefully he doesn't get that deep into it), I finally thought damn, I might actually have a chance to play guitar, my fingers were way faster than I thought, then I started playing the guitar I haven't touched, eventually bought a new one, wayyy better (2 months ago) and practice everything, and my motivation was guitar hero.. oh well maybe that might not work for a 9 year old since I'm 17
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#18
Personally, I'd teach him this lot, in this order:

1) Tuning. Teach him what notes the open strings are in standard, and how to tune either with the 5th fret or harmonics (or both).
2) Teach him a simple song from a band he likes, and tell him what scales/chords/etc they're using for each part, and how to derive them, etc. Might want to teach him several songs.
3) Teach him how the strings work; hammer-ons, pull-offs, (natural, leave the pinches out for now)harmonics and why they're there ("cutting" the string in half, quarters, thirds, etc), and some tapping/legato stuff if he's in there. Try to incorporate as much of it as possible into a song/songs he likes so he's still interested in it at the end instead of it being a chore. Like teach him "Thunderstruck" to get him started on hammers and pulls, "One" if he's interested in tapping.
4) Keep going with more complex stuff (keep him interested though, no point in teaching him sweeps or something if he's not into speed metal).

And if he's losing interest, don't keep going- if people aren't interested, they don't enjoy it, so you're running the risk of killing his interest in guitar if you do.

Also, try to get him into a band with friends or something so he's forced to be motivated. Cheap tactic, I know, but it worked for me. Believe me, that scale you can't remember comes a lot more easily when you've got a band to keep up with.
#19
Quote by XxDre09xX
my first guitar, a super cheap 80 one with super tiny frets and neck, I played it for like one week and dropped it and never played it in a whole year, then i started playing guitar hero since I got it last christmas, after 5 starring expert songs (hopefully he doesn't get that deep into it), I finally thought damn, I might actually have a chance to play guitar, my fingers were way faster than I thought, then I started playing the guitar I haven't touched, eventually bought a new one, wayyy better (2 months ago) and practice everything, and my motivation was guitar hero.. oh well maybe that might not work for a 9 year old since I'm 17


So you didnt play your guitar and rather played guitar hero for a year and you say guitar hero helps with learning guitar because it made your fingers faster? Sounds to me like guitar hero wasted a year of your practice time. How good could you possibly be having not played for a year and picking it up for 2 months. Not good at all i would wager. In contrast if you had smashed you guitar hero controller and played real guitar for the same amount of time you would probably be on your way to being a real guitar hero.
#20
Quote by MopMaster
Personally, I'd teach him this lot, in this order:

1) Tuning. Teach him what notes the open strings are in standard, and how to tune either with the 5th fret or harmonics (or both).
2) Teach him a simple song from a band he likes, and tell him what scales/chords/etc they're using for each part, and how to derive them, etc. Might want to teach him several songs.
3) Teach him how the strings work; hammer-ons, pull-offs, (natural, leave the pinches out for now)harmonics and why they're there ("cutting" the string in half, quarters, thirds, etc), and some tapping/legato stuff if he's in there. Try to incorporate as much of it as possible into a song/songs he likes so he's still interested in it at the end instead of it being a chore. Like teach him "Thunderstruck" to get him started on hammers and pulls, "One" if he's interested in tapping.
4) Keep going with more complex stuff (keep him interested though, no point in teaching him sweeps or something if he's not into speed metal).

And if he's losing interest, don't keep going- if people aren't interested, they don't enjoy it, so you're running the risk of killing his interest in guitar if you do.

Also, try to get him into a band with friends or something so he's forced to be motivated. Cheap tactic, I know, but it worked for me. Believe me, that scale you can't remember comes a lot more easily when you've got a band to keep up with.

I agree with this.
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#21
You should just teach him wrong, u know, just as a joke.
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