#1
right basically two questions:

1. can someone post the relationship (by this i mean what mood each of them create) between intervals. for example between 1 and 2, 1 and 3, 1 and 4, 1 and 5, 1 and 6, 1 and 7, 2 and 1, 2 and 3 etc and please dont miss any out cuz i need all of them

2. does the interval between 1 and 2 and the interval between 2 and 3 create the same mood?

just say if im not being clear
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#3
I just tried on my guitar playing intervals of the C major scale. With out context they dont do much for me. Just one interval to another is isnt really musical sounding. CDEFGAB.
C to B sounding like **** for some reason though.
Edit:
C to F and C to G sounded good. They are the 4th and 5th so that makes sense.
Last edited by /-\liceNChains at Aug 25, 2008,
#4
well each interval is supposed to make a different mood e.g. 1st note to 2nd might make it sound sad (i dont know if this is right)
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#6
well what about chords then?
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#7
Like i said the 4th and 5th sounds good. Those would be the 4 and 5 chords which makes sense that they sound good. Most common chords in songs are I IV V. Play C major scale play C then F then G or play C F and G chords that will sound pleasent and familiar. If you play C B D it will sound like ****. Try for yourself. Thats what I hear.

You might benefit from learning some theory lessons since you are curious. Why question in this way when you could have it laid out for you in better order so its less confusing. Get a theory book or go to musictheory.net and start reading form the begining. If your curious which you seem to be its doesnt make much sense to ask questions and piece the big picture together 1 question at a time when teachers and musicians have crafted lessons for ease of learning over hundreds of years.
#8
Intervals don't have moods. Their sound is determined entirely by context.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Thats what i was thinking but some definatly sound more agreeably to my ear with no other context than the 2 notes though.
#10
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Like i said the 4th and 5th sounds good. Those would be the 4 and 5 chords which makes sense that they sound good. Most common chords in songs are I IV V. Play C major scale play C then F then G or play C F and G chords that will sound pleasent and familiar. If you play C B D it will sound like ****. Try for yourself. Thats what I hear.

You might benefit from learning some theory lessons since you are curious. Why question in this way when you could have it laid out for you in better order so its less confusing. Get a theory book or go to musictheory.net and start reading form the begining. If your curious which you seem to be its doesnt make much sense to ask questions and piece the big picture together 1 question at a time when teachers and musicians have crafted lessons for ease of learning over hundreds of years.

i know about the three chord trick (I,IV,V) and im just wondering about the moods of other intervals
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#11
Quote by Conca
i know about the three chord trick (I,IV,V) and im just wondering about the moods of other intervals


Again, they don't have moods. Context is all that's important.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
also when i improvise, i always land on crappy notes that sound horrible even though theyre in the scale. any tips?

also it sounds like a scale how do i stop that?
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#15
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Three chord "trick"? How is it a trick?

i never said it
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#16
Quote by Conca
also when i improvise, i always land on crappy notes that sound horrible even though theyre in the scale. any tips?

also it sounds like a scale how do i stop that?


It sounds like a scale because it is a scale. As for your first question, focusing on chord tones is your best bet until you're familiar enough with the fretboard and the theory behind what your playing to anticipate what your playing is going to sound like before you play it.

i never said it


And I quote...

i know about the three chord trick (I,IV,V)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Proper note choice takes time and experimentation. Same with the other thing.

Some problems have a simple solution. Poor note choice...Are you following the chords? Even though a D# note is in the key of E major (well it's not a good note to rest on, anyways), it doesn't sound that amazing over an E Major chord. Look up Marty Friedman's Melodic Control video.
#18
1-Okay:

I-I Unison (Perfect consonant)
I-#1 Augmented Unison (Absolute dissonant)
I-bb2 Diminished second (Conditional dissonant)
I-b2 Minor Second (Absolute dissonant)
I-2 Mayor second (Conditional dissonant)
I-#2 Augmented second (Conditional dissonant)
I-bb3 Diminished third (Absolute dissonant)
I-b3 Minor third (Imperfect Consonant)
I-3 Major third (Imperfect Consonant)
I-#3 Augmented third (Conditional Dissonant)
I-bb4 Double diminished fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-b4 Diminished fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-4 Perfect fourth (Perfect Consonant)
I-#4 Augmented fourth (Semiconsonant)
I-X4 Double augmented fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-bb5 Double diminished fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-b5 Diminished fifth (Semiconsonant)
I-5 Perfect fifth (Perfect Consonant)
I-#5 Augmented fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-X5 Double augmented fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-bb6 Diminished sixth (Conditional dissonant)
I-b6 Minor sixth (Imperfect consonant)
I-6 Major sixth (Imperfect consonant)
I-#6 Augmented sixth (Absolute dissonant)
I-bb7 Diminished seventh (Conditional dissonant)
I-b7 Minor seventh (Absolute dissonant)
I-7 Major seventh (Absolute dissonant)
I-b8 Diminished octave (Absolute dissonant)
I-8 Octave (Perfect consonant)


I think I am not missing anything (I think you mean if it is consonant or dissonant by saying "mood")

2-Well, between 1-2 there is a major second, and between 2-3 there also is a major second, so the intervals are the same...
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 26, 2008,
#19
Quote by Conca
also when i improvise, i always land on crappy notes that sound horrible even though theyre in the scale. any tips?

also it sounds like a scale how do i stop that?


Yeah def like Acheo said. To start with target landing on one of the tones present in the chord when you play.

To stop sounding like you're just playing up and down scales you need to stop just playing up and down through scales. Try developing some melodic ideas or motifs from the scales. They might range from just a few notes or a full bar or a few bars. Don't be afraid of repeating a single idea fifteen times in a row if you have to. Don't completely ignore a good scale run either it can sound really nice when applied with taste.

Here's what I have been doing lately that I found has really helped my soloing,
I improv over a 15 minute simple backing track three to four times a day. I always record and listen to how it sounded afterwards. The next day I do the same thing over a different backing track. I use the same three or four backing tracks for 4-6 weeks and try to vary the key, rhythm, chord progression, and tempo to challenge myself.

I still make heaps of mistakes but when I listen to the first attempt from the first day and compare it to my third attempt on the day a week later the difference is phenomenal and it's really encouraging. By the time a six weeks has rolled by I can really feel good about myself. Though I still rarely go the full fifteen minutes without some bum notes and some off timing.

The cool thing is that each time I do it I will use some ideas that I have come up with before but always try to use them in new ways or vary them some way and I always try to come up with fresh ideas each time too.
Si
#20
Quote by gonzaw
1-Okay:

I-I Unison (Perfect consonant)
I-#1 Augmented Unison (Absolute dissonant)
I-bb2 Diminished second (Conditional dissonant)
I-b2 Minor Second (Absolute dissonant)
I-2 Mayor second (Conditional dissonant)
I-#2 Augmented second (Conditional dissonant)
I-bb3 Diminished third (Absolute dissonant)
I-b3 Minor third (Imperfect Consonant)
I-3 Major third (Imperfect Consonant)
I-#3 Augmented third (Conditional Consonant)
I-bb4 Double diminished fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-b4 Diminished fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-4 Perfect fourth (Perfect Consonant)
I-#4 Augmented fourth (Semiconsonant)
I-X4 Double augmented fourth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-bb5 Double diminished fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-b5 Diminished fifth (Semiconsonant)
I-5 Perfect fifth (Perfect Consonant)
I-#5 Augmented fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-X5 Double augmented fifth (Conditional Dissonant)
I-bb6 Diminished sixth (Conditional dissonant)
I-b6 Minor sixth (Imperfect consonant)
I-6 Major sixth (Imperfect consonant)
I-#6 Augmented sixth (Absolute dissonant)
I-bb7 Diminished seventh (Conditional dissonant)
I-b7 Minor seventh (Absolute dissonant)
I-7 Major seventh (Absolute dissonant)
I-b8 Diminished octave (Absolute dissonant)
I-8 Octave (Perfect consonant)


I think I am not missing anything (I think you mean if it is consonant or dissonant by saying "mood")

2-Well, between 1-2 there is a major second, and between 2-3 there also is a major second, so the intervals are the same...
Listen to this man.

ALso, what the hell is an augmented unison? and a double diminished second? Thats in 12 tet right?

Also, some guys believe that an interval used over a special chord will give a special sound. Like Friedman thinks using minor sixths over minor chords has an exotic effect, I think its someone gibson thinks Major sixths over minor chords has a brightening effect (I read it in one of those guitar magazines). You really have to experiment with this and make up your own decisions.
#21
Well, try ti think about this: what are the notes and what are their intervals - that probably makes the mood.
#22
Quote by demonofthenight
Listen to this man.

ALso, what the hell is an augmented unison? and a double diminished second? Thats in 12 tet right?

Also, some guys believe that an interval used over a special chord will give a special sound. Like Friedman thinks using minor sixths over minor chords has an exotic effect, I think its someone gibson thinks Major sixths over minor chords has a brightening effect (I read it in one of those guitar magazines). You really have to experiment with this and make up your own decisions.



12 tet?
Do you mean temperament or fret?
I don't think there is a double diminished second, since seconds and sevenths allow only diminished/minor/major/augmented and nothing more (in oppose to 4ths and 5ths)..


It basicly reduces to that, knowing the dissonance of each interval, experiment with each till you get the sound you want (nobody stops you from playing a Cmajor scale over a Bdim7 chord)....
#23
Quote by Archeo Avis
It sounds like a scale because it is a scale. As for your first question, focusing on chord tones is your best bet until you're familiar enough with the fretboard and the theory behind what your playing to anticipate what your playing is going to sound like before you play it.


And I quote...

yh i did say that but i didnt make it up
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