#1
Aight, a buddy of mine just mentioned he knows a lot of dudes that would like to jam. I've been playing for a couple years, and I want to know some ideas for improvising rhythm blues. Nowadays I've been wanking off in leads but I never really worked on rhythm. Any ideas?

Also, I know a thing or two on theory, but I still have no idea what the f*ck a I-IV etc progression is. Help?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#2
Blues I-IV-V prog is easy

A - D - E

play a 12 bar rhythm like

e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|-------------------2-2-4-2-2--------------------------------------------|
D|-----2-2-4-2-2--0-0-0-0-0-2-2-4-2-2-------------------------------|
A|-----0-0-0-0-0---------------0-0-0-0-0-2-2-4-2-2------------------|
E|---------------------------------------------0-0-0-0-0------------------|

Status Quo Style and you can mmove this about the fret board.

Hope this helps
Gear

Guitars - Fender Deluxe Player Strat, Squier Affinity Strat, Ibanez TCM - 50

Amps - Fender Blues Deluxe

Effects - Boss ME-50

Other - Banjo


Jazz Is not music, Its a way of life
#3
the i-iv-v thing is really easy

the key of C would be
C
F
G
key of A would be
A
D
E
depending on whether or not you want to use flats/ sharps etc

theres a good chance thats wrong though...im not actually all that sure =P
#4
A standard blues progression is the I-IV-V, which means the song is made of those chords. There are many variations you can do on this. I-IV-V just mean you play the I, or 1, chord first, the number of times the form of the progression you are doing requires (8-bar, 12-bar, etc). For 12 bar, you would play the I for 4 measures, the the IV for 2 measures, then back to the I for 2 measures. Then you would go to the V for 1 measure, then the IV for 1 measure, then back the the I for 2 measures making a total of 12 measures, hence 12 bar blues. You then repeat. For a simple variation you can do a "quick-change" replacing the 2nd measure of , in the begining with the IV for that 1 measure. Thats pretty basic, but i think that its right.

edit: as to I, IV, and V in themselves, I is the first chord in the key you would be playing in. IV would be the fourth, and V the fifth and so on. I, IV, and V are major, but you can mess around with all that to there are minor blues's and such, and of course it sounds cool to throw in 7th's as well, w/e you want.
Last edited by Faux at Aug 25, 2008,
#5
Ok, but what exactly do the Roman numerals mean?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#6
Roman Numerals are a way of denoting which chords to use without applying to any specific key.
I is the root IV is the fourth and V is the fifth.

So in E your major scale is
E F# G# A B C# D#

The I chord is E
the IV chord is A
the V chord is B

in blues it is common to use dominant sevenths for all the chords

E7 E7 A7 E7
B7 E7 A7 B7

Is an eight bar progression you might try, though 12 bar progressions are more common.

Also blues often uses a shuffle rhythm

This is the best I can do to illustrate the rhythm with tab.
|------------------------|
|------------------------|      
|2---2-4---4-2---2-4---4-|
|0---0-0---0-0---0-0---0-|
Si
#7
Ohh ok. Makes so much sense now. Thanks! I understand the numerals now.

What do you think about using these chords?? It's a C7 and just moving it around and such.



While chromatically moving it around that is, after a certain number of measures

|------------------------------------------------------------------|
|---1---------5---------------------------------------------------------|
|---3---------7---------------------------------------------------------|
|---2---------6---------------------------------------------------------|
|---3---------7----------------------------------------------------------|
|------------------------------------------------------------------CODE]
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#8
Sliding that shape around will work just fine. Those two shapes though are a major third apart though you want to go up one more fret for the second shape to get the IV chord Then up two more from there to get the V chord. I've put the right positions below.

Here's a variant of 12 bar blues that works.
|C7 /  /  /  |C7 /  /  /  |C7 /  /  /  |C7 /  /  /  |

|F7 /  /  /  |F7 /  /  /  |C7 /  /  /  |C7 /  /  /  |

|G7 /  /  /  |F7 /  /  /  |C7 /  F7 /  |C7 G7 /  /  |

Repeat as many times as you want.
You if you have a good chunky gain on it will sound good.

You might alternate the Major Triad and use the Dominant 7 more sparingly 
to create a bit more interest.
C   C7    F   F7    G   G7
x    x    x    x    x    x
3    3    8    8   10   10
2    2    7    7    9    9
0    3    x    8    x   10
1    1    6    6    8    8
0    0    x    x    x    x

Edit: Spaced out 12 bar blues for easier reading.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Aug 26, 2008,
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
Sliding that shape around will work just fine. Those two shapes though are a major third apart though you want to go up one more fret for the second shape to get the IV chord Then up two more from there to get the V chord. I've put the right positions below.

Here's a variant of 12 bar blues that works.
|C7 / / / |C7 / / / |C7 / / / |C7 / / / |
|F7 / / / |F7 / / / |C7 / / / |C7 / / / |
|G7 / / / |F7 / / / |C7 / F7 / |C7 G7 / / |

Repeat as many times as you want.
You if you have a good chunky gain on it will sound good.

You might alternate the Major Triad and use the Dominant 7 more sparingly 
to create a bit more interest.
C C7 F F7 G G7
x x x x x x
3 3 8 8 10 10
2 2 7 7 9 9
0 3 x 8 x 10
1 1 6 6 8 8
0 0 x x x x

Err, why, for the bars, are the chords stacked? I'm lost.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#10
he is just denoting measures and beats (in 4/4 time) So the "|" separates measures
Standard Fender Telecaster
Fender Blues Jr
Ibz10
#11
Yeah^

There's 12 bars. I'll put a space in to help it appear more clear.

If you haven't seen bars written this way before...

This |C7 / / / | Represents one bar. In this bar you would play C7 for four beats.

This |C7 G7 / / | Represents one bar. in this bar you would play C7 for one beat and G7 for the second third and fourth beats.

This |C7 / F7 / | Represents one bar. In this bar you would play C7 for beat one and two and F7 for beats three and four.

Still confused?
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Aug 26, 2008,
#12
Consider throwing a few 9 chords in there, for flavor.
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
Yeah^

There's 12 bars. I'll put a space in to help it appear more clear.

If you haven't seen bars written this way before...

This |C7 / / / | Represents one bar. In this bar you would play C7 for four beats.

This |C7 G7 / / | Represents one bar. in this bar you would play C7 for one beat and G7 for the second third and fourth beats.

This |C7 / F7 / | Represents one bar. In this bar you would play C7 for beat one and two and F7 for beats three and four.

Still confused?

Ohhh. Of course. Sorry, I have ways to catch up.
I get it though, thanks much.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#15
Quote by sbikram
dont forget the shuffle rhythm...

For a truely bluesy sound shuffle rhythm is essential. I love a good shuffle blues It's like sex in six strings.

However you can get away with playing the bars in any kind of rhythm you want.
Si
#16
Regarding the Roman numerals...

Every key works the same way. The capital numerals designate Major, the lower case are minor.

I ii iii IV V vi vii(b5)

The chords in the key of C are -- C, Dmin, Emin, F, G, Amin, Bmin(b5)

Key of E -- E, F#min, G#min, A, B, C#min, D#m(b5)

All of these indicate the triads...the 3-note version of the chord. The last triad is diminished. But, I am referring to it as minor-flat 5. The reason is this...

If I want to make all the chords have 4 notes instead of 3, I add the 7th tone in realtionship to each new root.

So, the first chord is CMaj7 = C, E, G, B = 1, 3, 5, 7

When I call D my new root ( making a D chord ) I get a Dmin7 = D, F, A, C = 1, b3, 5, b7

Why is that? In the C chord, C is 1 and E is 3. The E note is 2 whole steps ( 4 frets ) higher.
That means it is major.

When I call D note #1 the note F becomes 3. But, the F is only 3 frets higher than the D. That makes it minor. This same logic applied to the remaining notes gives me a sequence of chords that we all see - I ii iii IV V vi vii(b5).

The roster of 4-note chords is CMaj7, Dmin7, Emin7, FMaj7, G7, Amin7, Bmin7b5.

The formula for the last chord is 1, b3, b5, b7. = B, D, F, A. This chord is also referred to as "half-diminished." Bmin7b5 and B half-diminished are the same thing. When written it will often have the little circle, like a diminished chord symbol, but there will be a slash through the circle.

A "fully diminished" chord ( Cdim7 ) has a formula of 1, b3, b5, bb7. Yes, double-flatted 7. Sure, it's the same note as the 6 in the scale, but "theoretically" I took the b7 from a half-diminsihed chord, and flatted it again. So, I have to use the same letter that is associated with scale degree #7.

Here's a good example: In the key of Db - chord #7 is Cmin7b5. The formula is 1, b3, b5, b7 = C, Eb, Gb, Bb. A "fully" diminished C chord ( Cdim7 ) = 1, b3, b5, bb7 = C, Eb, Gb, Bbb. Yep, Bbb. "B double-flat." It's the same note as "A," but if you call it A your classical theory buds will whisper things behind your back.

It's like playing in the key of E and saying, "play an Ab." There is no Ab in the key of E. There's a G#... same note...different name...

I am planning an instructional website soon. If anyone cares, I'll let ya know when it's online....

And, if someone asks, I'll tell ya why "G7 and GMaj7 are both major chords that have a 7, so why say Major in only one of them?"

rev
#17
Sorry I got off topic from the original. Just saw the question about the numbers and went nuts. It won't happen again...

rev